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Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

A new generation of of "cafe kids"

Saturday 4th July.

Four of Vio and Ayesha Nedianu's children. Vio, a native of Timisoara in Romania, came to Bingara when he saw the search was on for someone to take over the Roxy, saw what had been done to the cafe, and fell in love with the concept all over again. Ayesha was originally from Jordan.

Vio and Ayesha and five of their eight children - Amira, Zacharia, Ramona, Latifa and Hercules - have left Brisbane and their family Italian ristorante behind to make a new home in the town known as the ‘Gem of the New England’.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

Many meals were served through the Roxy Cafe's opening week

Saturday 4th July.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

A large crowd gathered on the inside of the Roxy Cafe

On the first few days of the Roxy Cafe opening. Saturday 4th July.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

More customers lining the entry of the Roxy Cafe to get in.

On the first few days of the Roxy Cafe opening. Saturday 4th July.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

First few days of the Roxy Cafe opening. Saturday 4th July

Customers lined the entry of the Cafe to get in.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by North West Magazine on 05.07.2012

Welcome to new-look Bingara Roxy Cafe

North West Magazine, June 25th 2012, page 3

Photograph: Vio Nedianu, left, and his assistant, Davinder Bobby Singh, are looking forward to the opening of the Roxy Cafe this week.

Almost half a century since it last served a milk shake or a mixed grill, Bingara's Roxy Cafe is again open for business.

The iconic establishment once a part of the magnificent Roxy Theatre complex in Bingara's main street, will re-open its doors on Wednesdy to coincide with the town's annual Orange Festival and with Bingara Central School's 150 year celebration reunion.

The theatre, restored to its former glory and now regarded as one of the State's premier tourism facilities, has been hosting world-class artists and stage and screen productions for several years.
It was only natural that the cafe, closed for close to 46 years, would also be 'brought back to life'.

Restoration was complete last year in time for the 75th Anniversary Gala Ball which celebrated the town's Greek connection with an unforgettable evening of feasting and festivity under the stars.

The only hurdle was finding someone to keep the cafe's doors open. Enter Vio and Ayesha Nedianu. Vio, a native of Timisoara in Romania, came to Bingara when he saw the search was on for someone to take over the Roxy, saw what had been done to the cafe, and fell in love all over again.
Vio and Ayesha and five of their eight children - Amira, Zacharia, Ramona, Latifa and Hercules - have left Brisbane and their family Italian ristorante behind to make a new home in the town known as the ‘Gem of the New England’.

Together with Davinder (Bobby) Singh, Vio and Ayesha have been "burning the midnight oil" to ensure everything is in readiness for the weekend's big opening. "This is a great opportunity for our family to establish something important in this wonderful town," said Vio.

"We have been made feel incredibly welcome by the people of this wonderful town and the council and the people who are behind making the Roxy complex one of the true treasures of the region," said Vio.

''We fell in love with Bingara and the cafe and we plan to make it once again a place for people to gather and enjoy fine food.''

The new menu at the Roxy Cafe will feature lunch fare and a special evening presentation, specialising in Italian, Indian and Australian cuisine.
''Lunch will be light and practical, with wraps, sandwiches, calamari, bolognaise and functional meals.
''For our evening menu, there will be exquisite entrees and great desserts: and we are going to feature a lot of fresh seafood, with for example a risotto with crab, prawn, bug meat, chilli, white wine, garlic and fresh tomato sauce," Vio added.

"We will be providing fine Italian cured meats, select olives and cheeses and our coffee is the super boutique roasted Rouge provided especially for us from our good friends in Brisbane," Vi o added.

Fully licensed, patrons will be able to enjoy a selection of local and imported wines and beers.

The set-up or the refurbished Roxy Cafe lends itself perfectly to functions such as weddings, birthdays and parties and Vio and Ayesha plan to cater to that market.

They encourage and welcome tour buses and visitors to the nearby Roxy Theatre who also want to enjoy a fine meal in an ambiance reminiscent of an era that was a once-thriving Greek cafe culture.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 09.07.2012

The Roxy Cafe. An Australian and Greek-Australian icon establishes permanency.

Photograph: Vio and Ayesha Nedianu working feverishly on Saturday the 30th July, the third day of operation of the Roxy Cafe. Between the annual Orange Festival, and the 150th Anniversary of the opening of Bingara Public School, Bingara was 'buzzing'.

The Roxy Cafe, Bingara, known as the Peters and Co Cafe, gains a very long term operator.

This means that now, within the Roxy 'complex' there exists 4 fully operational and fully established components - the Roxy THEATRE, the Roxy CAFE, the Roxy INFORMATION CENTRE, and the TAFE Hospitality Traing Centre.

The final jewel in the crown will be the Roxy Museum.

It it worth recounting the history of how all these very important aspects of the Roxy Complex came into existence.

Restoration and Development of Greek & Kytherian Sacred sites.
Preservation of Australian and Art Deco Heritage sites
.

Bingara is a small north-west NSW town, that lies within Gwydir Shire. The population of Bingara is 1300. The map shows the location of the town in relationship to the North West of NSW, the NSW coastline, and the Queensland border. Bingara is a 7 hour drive from both Sydney and Brisbane, and about 3½ hours drive to the larger coastal towns. In 1936, three Kytherians, Peter John Feros, Katsehamos, (Mitata), George Ernest (Proto)Psaltis, Katsavias, (Frilingianika), and Emanuel Theodoropoulos Aronis, known as Emanuel Aroney, (Aroniadika), inspired by a “megalo ithea”, built a magnificent art deco Cinema, the the Roxy Theatre. Adjoining it they also built a well furnished café, the Roxy Café. This traded under the name Peters and Co. Peters and Co signs are still displayed on the shop fronts of numerous former Kytherian cafes throughout NSW. Behind both buildings, the partners also built a large guesthouse.

The story of how the Roxy came to be built is well told by the grandson of Peter Feros, Peter Prineas, in his superbly written book, Katsehamos and the Great Idea. In 2010, the Roxy was the subject of an article in the June issue of the Magazine of the Royal Historical Society, and featured prominently in the first of the Fox Bio Channel programmes ‘As Australian As’, during May. The programme was written and narrated by Australian actor John Woods.

Those who have read Katsehamos and the Great Idea will know that, gross over-capitalisation, and a determined opponent, Victor Peacocke, who operated the Regent Theatre, and a subsequent discount price war, that broke out between the two groups, bankrupted the Kytherians. The Roxy was sold off, and operated as a cinema until 1958 when it closed down. Apart from the occasional films screening, the odd boxing match or roller disco, it would spend the next forty years virtually lying dormant. Members of a new generation were growing up in the town having never stepped foot inside it. They may well have walked past the facade every day of their lives, with little clue as to the grandeur that lay within. Whilst the Roxy Theatre became a “sleeping beauty”, the Regent was well patronized through the 1950s.

In 1999, The (then) Bingara Council purchased the Roxy Theatre. Meanwhile, the Roxy Café was operated by various Greek and Kytherian owners until the mid 1960’s, when it was turned into a memorabilia shop. It morphed into a Chinese restaurant for twenty years, until it too was purchased by the Gwydir Shire Council in 2008.

The Roxy Theatre successfully obtained funding from the three tiers of Government extant in Australia, and it was transformed into a veritable “palace of dreams” – in Kevin Cork’s phraseology – a ‘parthenon down under”. Triumphantly opened in 2004, it is one of the most beautiful Art Deco theatres in Australia.

In November 2009 the Gwydir Council was the recipient of a grant of $750,000 through the Department of Heritage, Environment, Water and Arts, under the Australian Commonwealth Government Jobs Fund. This funding ensured that the Roxy Cafe, was also restored to its original splendour. Additionally, a medium scale conference facility was renovate upstairs above the café, as well as a museum designed to celebrate the story of immigration and acknowledges the significance of the Greek café. The Tourist Information Centre was also relocated into the Roxy ‘complex’, and re-furbished in the art deco style, to ensure the building had an integrated design.

Coincidently, the Infromation Centre was housed in the very location where another Kytherian, Dr Archie Kalokerinos, Greek-Australian of the century, maintained a doctor’s surgery for more than a decade.

In 2011, the Roxy ‘complex’ received further funding of $750,000 from Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations to add a trade training centre to the rear of the Roxy Cafe. This training centre will offer Certificate III Level Hospitality Training and will be run in conjunction with the Gwydir Learning Region, the Department of Education and Training, and TAFE NSW. The building of this will be completed as of July 2012.

Architectural firm, Magoffin and Deakin from Armidale, NSW, who were the architects for the Roxy Theatre (2003), and are also the architects for the Roxy Café and Roxy Museum (2010), were again commissioned to complete this work. This extension of the training facility has again been superbly integrated by Magoffin and Deakin.

Greek & Kytherian Sacred Sites, & pilgrimage destinations

Australian and Art Deco Heritage and pilgrimage site
.

Most Greek-Australians are not aware that a Hellenic Museum exists in Australia. It is housed in the opulent Mint Building in William Street, in the CBD of Melbourne, Victoria. It has been operating for 3 years. The money to fund the Museum was donated by one Greek Australian benefactor, Spiros Stamoulis.

The word Roxy in its Greek and Persian origins means bright, dawn, star. But the Roxy is greater than a bright star. Governments have paid Greek and Kytherian Australians the ultimate tribute, by spending more than $3 million over 7 years on creating what can best be described as Greek and Kytherian Heritage and Sacred Sites and pilgrimage destinations.

When Greeks and Kytherians visit these sacred sites they are stunned by the monetary investment expended on the Roxy Theatre, by the beauty of the building, by the "reverence" that many residents of the town have for the Roxy ‘complex’. Many are moved to tears at the ‘Roxy” memorial to their grandparents, parents, relatives, and their own lives in cafes, cinemas and other retail establishments in Australia.

The Roxy Cafe. The Peters & Co Cafe.

Much of the original equipment in the café was located during the restoration process. Some was generously donated by local residents, and north western Greeks and Kytherians. Sandy McNaughton has also tracked down and purchased many tables, chairs, booths, refrigeration units, and café artefacts, to install in the café, and display in the Museum. Most came from Greek and Kytherian café’s in the region. This allowed the cafe to be restored to a authentic and very high standard.

The next challenge was: could a restaurateur of very high standard be enticed to Bingara to lease the cafe? Since being ‘stirred from sleep’, the Roxy complex has been blessed by good fortune. The complex has been the recipient of a number of grants that have allowed enhanced the standard of the building and its amenity. Would this good fortune flow over to finding the perfect operator for the Roxy Cafe?

Yet again, the answer appears to be – yes it would, and yes it did. In May 2012, Vio Nedianu, a Rumanian migrant, with his Jordanian wife, Ayesha, and 6 children made the monumental decision to make a “tree change” to Bingara, and sign an extended lease on the Roxy Cafe.

Vio Nedianu

Until his decision to re-locate he had been a partner in a successful restaurant called Vio’s Ristorante in the Brisbane suburb of Paddington. Paddington is one of the most competitive and densely serviced cafe and restaurant “strips” in Australia.

See the website http://www.viosristorante.com.au

The Greek’s and Kytherian’s, from as early as the 1880’s in Australia found it comparatively easy to establish themselves as cafe and cinema proprietors in Australia. A significant number of their compatriots were established in the industry and could lend them assistance, both monetary and experiential to become established. The Rumanian presence in Australia is not as numerous, nor as concentrated in hospitality as that of Greeks’ and Kytherians. All the same, Vio established himself in the industry, owning and managing various coffee shops, fish and chip’s shops, and restaurants’ in Tasmania, Potts Point, Bondi Junction and Brisbane.

As well as leasing the Roxy, Vio will be able to tender for catering opportunities in the Roxy Theatre, such as parties, weddings, conventions and other larger scale functions and events. He will also gain accreditation to be able to ‘teach’ the hospitality courses in the TAFE training centre that adjoins the rear of the cafe. Vio will bring a different culinary experience for the enjoyment of not only residents of Bingara. It is anticipated that residents from neighbouring towns such as Delungara, Inverell, Moree, Warialda, Glenn Innes, Barraba, Manilla, and even Tamworth will be enticed to sample the culinary delights of the Roxy Cafe. It is also anticipated that travellers, tourists, and Greek and Kytherian ‘pilgrims’ will also travel even longer distances to come and sample the food at the Roxy Cafe.

As you can see from the photograph that heads this entry, the food began being served in the last 3 days of June, 2012.

The Roxy currently attracts over 12,000 patrons and visitors annually to numerous events and activities held there. The Roxy projects will guarantee the delivery of further economic benefits to the town through an increase in tourism, as well as the training and employment opportunities on offer.

The Roxy Museum, The final challenge.

How can Kytherians help make these sacred sites even better?

The original neon sign has been found. Already, one Kytherian family, grandchildren of Emanuel Aroney, an original Roxy owner, have agreed to pay to restore this unique sign.

Do you have any café artefacts that will eventually be lost? Do you have Greek costumes, or other “realia”? Consider placing them on loan, or donating them to the Roxy.

Are you qualified in Museum and Gallery management? Do you have other expertise? Consider donating some time?

Are you at school or university and need to do a project on this subject. Venture to Bingara, and fulfil your requirements there?

The Government funding has not included to date electronic and computer equipment to fit out the Museum. Can you donate equipment? Are you part of a Hellenic organisation that can?

This is a chance to make a real difference.

Contact Sandy McNaughton by email.

Contact Peter McCarthy by email.

Kytherians Peter Prineas, Peter McCarthy,(aka, Makarthis, Delungra, married to Deanna Psaros), & George C Poulos are also on the Roxy Museum Committee. John Wearne, former Councillor & Mayor, and Peter A Jones, President of the Bingara District Historical Society, are the local representatives.

Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea


Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by North West Magazine on 05.07.2012

Welcome to new-look Bingara Roxy Cafe

North West Magazine, June 25th 2012, page 3

Photograph: Vio Nedianu, left, and his assistant, Davinder Bobby Singh, are looking forward to the opening of the Roxy Cafe this week.

Almost half a century since it last served a milk shake or a mixed grill, Bingara's Roxy Cafe is again open for business.
The iconic establishment once a part of the magnificent Roxy Theatre complex in Bingara's main street, will re-open its doors on Wednesdy to coincide with the town's annual Orange Festival and with Bingara Central School's 150 year celebration reunion.
The theatre, restored to its former glory and now regarded as one of the State's premier tourism facilities, has been hosting world-class artists and stage and screen productions for several years.
It was only natural that the cafe, closed for close to 46 years, would also be 'brought back to life'.
Restoration was complete last year in time for the 75th Anniversary Gala Ball which celebrated the town's Greek connection with an unforgettable evening of feasting and festivity under the stars.
The only hurdle was finding someone to keep the cafe's doors open. Enter Vio and Ayesha Nedianu. Vio, a native of Timisoara in Romania, came to Bingara when he saw the search was on for someone to take over the Roxy, saw what had been done to the cafe, and fell in love all over again.
Vio and Ayesha and five of their eight children - Amira, Zacharia, Ramona, Latifa and Hercules - have left Brisbane and their family Italian ristorante behind to make a new home in the town known as the ‘Gem of the New England’.

Together with Davinder (Bobby) Singh, Vio and Ayesha have been "burning the midnight oil" to ensure everything is in readiness for the weekend's big opening. "This is a great opportunity for our family to establish something important in this wonderful town," said Vio.
"We have been made feel incredibly welcome by the people of this wonderful town and the council and the people who are behind making the Roxy complex one of the true treasures of the region," said Vio.
''We fell in love with Bingara and the cafe and we plan to make it once again a place for people to gather and enjoy fine food.''
The new menu at the Roxy Cafe will feature lunch fare and a special evening presentation, specialising in Italian, Indian and Australian cuisine.
''Lunch will be light and practical, with wraps, sandwiches, calamari, bolognaise and functional meals.
''For our evening menu, there will be exquisite entrees and great desserts: and we are going to feature a lot of fresh seafood, with for example a risotto with crab, prawn, bug meat, chilli, white wine, garlic and fresh tomato sauce," Vio added.
"We will be providing fine Italian cured meats, select olives and cheeses and our coffee is the super boutique roasted Rouge provided especially for us from our good friends in Brisbane," Vi o added.

Fully licensed, patrons will be able to enjoy a selection of local and imported wines and beers.

The set-up or the refurbished Roxy Cafe lends itself perfectly to functions such as weddings, birthdays and parties and Vio and Ayesha plan to cater to that market.

They encourage and welcome tour buses and visitors to the nearby Roxy Theatre who also want to enjoy a fine meal in an ambiance reminiscent of an era that was a once-thriving Greek cafe culture.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 09.07.2012

Two Peters at Roxy Bingara

Peter Makarthis (Mc Carthy) Principal Researcher, and Peter Giannes of Inverell, at the Roxy Bingara NSW with promotion for the Roxy Museum Committee on Orange Day 30 June 2012.

Contact Peter McCarthy by email.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 21.06.2012

Cosmopolitan Oyster Parlour in Pitt St, owned by the Comino brothers - my grandmothers uncles

It is the building immediately next to the Hotel in the right hand side corner.

The Life story of George and Agapi Lianos

The Lianos Comino Odyssey


My Grandparents were Agapi and George Lianos from Kythera,Greece. Papou was born on the 9th June1873 in the village of Liananika to Emmanuel and Relia, farm owners. He was the only son and had four sisters, Irene, Kerani, Marigo and Stavroula. Agapi's birth date was in 1867.

He worked on the farm with his parents and at the age of twenty four married Agapi the seventeen year old daughter of Anthony and Theodora Comino on the 15th February 1897.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos c. 1900

His parents gave them some land with a two room house on it and it was there that their first child Stavroula was born on the 31st July 1898. But conditions were very hard in Kythera so they decided that Papou should go to Australia to try his luck. Also his wife's brothers, Dimitrios, Menas and Nicholas,and her Uncles Zacharias and Ioanis Comino, were already settled in Sydney, which would be a great help to him, he hoped.

He arrived in Pireaus on 16th September 1898 where he arranged his papers and passport and arranged for his passage to Sydney. On the 20th September 1898 he left on an Egyptian Steam boat for Port Said where he stayed for several days. Then on the 28th September 1898 he boarded a new German steamer called the Barbarossa, and set sail for his new life in Australia.

After a lovely and uneventful trip he arrived at Circular Quay Sydney on the 30th of October 1898 and was met by his brothers-in-law and taken to lodgings and instructed in what was to be his life for some time to come. A bad joke was played on him by his brothers-in-law, who had put him in a bug infested room on his first night in Australia, but then gave him a room in one of their homes.

And it was hard. From the 3rd November 1898 he had to get up at 3.a.m. to go to the markets to collect oysters and fish and bring the produce back to the cellar and clean the fish and open the oysters. He then had to go upstairs to scrub the floor, clean the tables and wash the cutlery in preparation for the evening work in the restaurant. Then he had to go back to the cellar to open more oysters. Then it was back to the pantry to wash up the cutlery and dishes from the restaurant after it closed. He went to bed at midnight, and then the routine started again. He had Sundays off but had to clean his room and wash his clothes. Then he dressed up in the best clothes he had and went for a walk in the Domain but he had to be home by 5p.m. to prepare himself for the next day. And so it went on.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos, early in their married life, with Emmanuel and Stavroula

During the next four years he had a series of good and bad experiences in business and family dealings, but he was finally doing well enough to bring his wife and child to join him. In November 1900 they were a united family again. They worked very hard in the latest business they had purchased which was very successful. Their first child to be born in Australia was Emmanuel born on 3rd January 1903. Their next child was Theodora born on 29th January 1905, and on 20th March 1907 another daughter Aspacia was born. He then made the decision to return to Greece and on the16th April 1907 left on the Orient Liner Ormes.

However Theodora became very ill and they had to disembark at Colombo, a decision which saved her life. They stayed there for fifteen days and continued on their journey on the Ortona, and arrived in Pireaus on the 7th June 1907, where they stayed for fifteen days and then travelled to their intended destination Agia Pelagia where they were greeted with great joy by his father and sisters. From there they travelled to their village Liananika and were greeted with great enthusiam by the villagers.

They spent the next few years (3yrs and 10mths to be exact) having a happy time. During this time another son Anthony was born on the 28th January 1908 and Papou built a beautiful home and furnished it with the best furniture which he bought from a shop in Pireaus owned by an in.law J.Venathis. The house was started on the 15th May and completed on the 28th November 1908.

Lianos family home on Kythera, built by my grandfather, George Lianos

Unfortunately he was persuaded by some in-laws to lend them money for their business ventures and then refused to repay him. As he was not receiving the monies due to him from his investments in Australia from his in-laws whom he trusted, he was forced to return to Australia to investigate things. His intention was to return to Greece in a couple of years. So in October 1910, they left Cerigo (as it was called then) and arrived back in Australia on the 7th February 1911, and took over his shop from his brother-in-law Menas Comino and was shocked to see how little money there was for him. However he worked very hard and built the business up and started doing well again . During this time another son Menas, was born on the 1th April 1911 and business was really booming. But he was too trusting of his in-laws and was tricked by them once again and he had many business problems as a result of their actions. About this time another daughter Coralia was born on the 24th April 1913.

At the end of 1912, he intended to sell up everything and return to Greec but once again he was persuaded by his in-laws to do otherwise and made bad decisions which cost him dearly. He opened a lolly shop and milk bar in Elizabeth St. Sydney but again he had bad partners and lost a lot of money. Another son Theodore was born on the 13th December 1914.

Then war had started in Europe in 1914, and business plunged dramatically because the soldiers behaved like larrikins and refused to pay for food and drinks and threatened to smash the windows (which they did once) if he complained. It was a bad time for all shopkeepers. He then went into business at 661 George St,and it was from there that his first daughter Stella married John Aroney in the 1st August 1917, and the wedding reception was held at the George St business and the 100 guests sang and danced till 2.a.m. It was the first genuine Cerigotis wedding held in Australia.

A photograph of the Cosmopolitan Oyster Parlour in Pitt St, owned by the Comino brothers - my grandmothers uncles, c. 1900, heads this entry.

Business was improving and his landlord then offered to sell him the shop and the one next door but the price was too high and he refused. It was then sold to a Theo Marks and when the current lease expired, his terms for a new lease were excessive and not worth while considering. But he had bills to pay, the wine licence and fittings being a few things to pay. His brother-in-law Menas told him that if he walked away from everything, because the bills were so small no one would chase him for it. But it was bad advice. With his wife and family and new son Socrates born on the 20th January 1918 they left Sydney for Murwillimbah where his daughter Stella and her husband John were in business and John offered him a small shop next door to theirs to open a business. But Theo Marks in Sydney did not walk away from monies owing to him and sent a summons to Murwillumbah. The severe flu epidemic had hit Australia and Papou was ill and unable to go to Sydney to defend the summons so he was declared bankrupt.

But things were no better in Murwillumbah as John Aroney had sold the small shop to help his brother return to Greece, and would not give Papou a larger share of his shop as compensation for the money he had put in renovating the smaller shop. They returned to Sydney and settled in Palmer St. Papou was out of work for five months and only Emanuel was working. He worked in Uncle Mena's and Uncle Nicholas' shop making five to ten gallons of ice cream every morning and serving in the restaurant at night. This helped to pay off the bankruptcy so that his father would not dip into the little money he had left.

Papou then opened a shop in Oxford St and fitted it out but it was not a success and he had to close it. And that was the last of his money. Another daughter Diamantoula was born on the 4th August 1920. Then in October 1921, they decided to go to Gunnedah and bought a broken down shop which he renovated completely as a milk bar. He put in a soda fountain and the business started to build up. It was there that great plans were made for the future and Papou thought he was on his way again at last.

But as the saying goes "Man proposes and God disposes" and so it was with my Grandfather.

Another son Constantine was born on the 4th October 1922. There were eleven children born to Agapi and George Lianos.

My mother with her 10 brothers and sisters

Back row: Aspacia, Menas, Theodora and Stavroula. Seated: Theodore, Diamantoula, Emanuel, Anthony, Socrates, Coralia and Constantine sitting on stool.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos later in life – in 1942

My grandmother died soon after this photograph was taken, at age 62, in July 1942.

My grandfather in 1960, surrounded by his eleven children

8 remaining children of George and Agapi Lianos, 1987, in Uncle Tony's home, in Killarney Heights

Gravesite of the Lianos family, Botany Cemetery, Sydney

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 30.04.2012

The Crescent Theatre at Fairfield owned by Bretos Margetis

Bretos owned this theatre from approximately 1924 to 1929. He also owned the Butterfly Theatre in Fairfield. He and my Mother Theodora ran both both the theatres and, a shop at 617 George Street, Sydney, at the same time, during these years.

I have written the Life Story of my father, which features in the Notable Kytherians section. My father was a Founding Member of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 1922. He was also on the organising Committtee of Ayia Triatha church in Surry Hills.

Bretos Margetis

24th November, 1889 - 12th November, 1961.

My father Bretos Margetis was named after his grandfather, who is pictured here with his daughters,and was probably born about 1850. His son George married Vasilia Galanis and they had three boys, Bretos, Dimitri and Minas, and three girls Maria, Panayiotitsa and Evangelia.

Dad was born on the 24th November 1889 in Aroniathika and went to the village school with his brothers and sisters and was a keen student. (Of interest is the origin of the name. It appears to come from the baptismal name of the mother (Margeta or Marieta),but was used as a nickname in the beginning but appears for the first time in the parish register of Saint Mina in Logothetianika in 1801, but was still regarded as a nickname. Also it appears that three members Margetis, came from Koropi (on the coast going to Sounion) two of whom settled in Araniathika where they added the name Aroney in order to register their origin. A century later it made an appearance in Chora. It appears that the present day family name, Margetis was originally a nickname of one branch of the large family Aroney of Aroniathika, but it was decided by the Prefects of Argolidos and Corinthias, that the family name Aroney be replaced by Margetis.

Apart from Kythera the family name is mentioned in Crete, and in an earlier period 1536 it is mentioned in a catalogue of conscripts from Chania, and in 1678 there is reference in Kefallinia to a painter of icons Christodoulos Margetis. These cases show that the family name Margetis has connections outside the region and are linked directly with Kythera.)

But to continue:
Judging by the photograph the men appear to be wearing their "Sunday Best", but life on the land was very hard, so their father decided that the boys had to seek a better life elsewhere, and chose Australia as they had relatives there already who would be able to help them.

George Margetis with his sons, from left to right, Minas, Bretos and Jim, taken in Greece, about 1902

Bretos was the first to go and arrived in Sydney on the 3rd of December 1903 on the ship Orizaba.He stayed with an Uncle (name unknown) and went to school, and learnt English quickly by reading the local newspapers and having a dictionary beside him to look up words he didn't understand. He was a good student and did well,even with language difficulties. When he left school he helped his Uncle in his business and managed to save money to send home to his family in Kythera. He continued saving as much as he could and by the time he was nineteen he had his first restaurant.

In 1915 he had to register with the government,and received a Certificate of Registration of Alien, under The War Precautions (Aliens Registration)Regulations 1916 and was finaly registered at a Police Station in Sydney. He then became active in the Kytherian Association, and was one of the founding members of the commitee,and was the Secretary 1924-1826.
Two of his sisters, Panayiotitsa (Bonney) and Evangalia, and his two brothers, Dimitri ( Uncle Jim) and Minas came to Australia, but Mina later returned to Greece to his parents and sister Maria.The girls married, Bonney to Vasili Georgopoulos who had been a chef at the royal court in Athens, and later opened the Athenian Restaurant in Castlreagh St., and Evangalia to Spiro Coroneo (Uncle Sam) who opened a business in Greenthorpe, south west, N.S.W. Uncle Jim never married because he was short and worried that he would have short children.

Bretos opened a restaurant at 617 George St Sydney with white tablecloths on the tables and red velvet covered chairs. It was an "up market" restaurant and served three course meals for two and sixpence,which was expensive for those times. It is interesting to note that the shop next door was a Chemist Shop which may have given Dad the idea for his future children to become Pharmacists (which they did).

He developed a love for music, especially Opera,and took singing lessons with a Mrs Cresswell who taught him many songs from operas, but his favourite was La Donna Mobile wich he sang with great gusto at friends parties. Through this interest he met Theodora Lianos who was also a music lover,and had learnt to play the piano quite well,and soon there were wedding bells in the air and they married at the Agia Triatha in Surry Hills.

Dad had also bought two Picture Shows in Fairfield The Crescent and The Butterfly,and while he took care of the business in town,Mum travelled to Fairfield to manage the businesses out there.It was in Fairfield that Dad obtained his life long passion for cricket and in 1925 was asked by the Fairfield Cricket Club to be their Vice-President, which he accepted with pleasure.

But the Depression was still here and things were not going well in Australia and the rest of the world,and Dad had to close the restaurant at first,and later the Picture Shows, and so lost everything. But he was the eternal optimist,and always believed that when one door closed another one opened. He took jobs wherever he could find them and went to Parkes at one time, and back to Bondi, and was a cook in his brother-in-laws restaurant. He even opened a cake shop in Double Bay, the Niagara Cake Shop, but the economy was still bad, so he had to close it too. Then Dad was offered a job in Canberra with Harry Notaras and went there to try his luck.

At that time Mum, George and I lived in a flat in Double Bay and went to the Double Bay Public School (which is still there). Mum took a part-time job in a sweet factory, folding the little cardboard boxes that the sweets went in. Mum always made sure that she was home before we walked home from school and greeted us dressed as if she was going out.

Mum also arranged for George and I to have music lessons with Mrs Cresswell and paid for them by sewing dresses for her .When Mrs Cresswell came to give us our piano lessons she often heard me singing, and even though I was about eight years old, apart from teaching me the piano she taught me a few little songs, a couple of which I still remember.

I went on to the Wollahra Opportunity School and George went to Randwick Boys High School. Then Dad was offered the opportunity to buy one of the Notaras shops in Kingston which he accepted and at last at the age of Fifty-three he was on his way to start a new life at Victor's Rotary Cafe in Kingston Canberra,and he sent for his family to join him at last.

Once in Canberra Mum and Dad joined the Greek Community and became very active in promoting Greece by broadcasting and arranging programmes on special Greek Days, the 25th of March and the 28th 0f October on the radio station 2CA .George read speeches about these days,and I sang Greek Songs, and records of Greek music were also played. These were fairly well received by the general community there, but there was still a certain amount of xenophobia, even though Greece was fighting with the Allies.

Dad met many young men who were customers, who came to say goodbye to him when they leaving for the war in Europe and some kept in touch by letters. Some cadets from the nearby Duntroon Military College,would ring to say they were coming in the evening for a meal. Even though it was after hours in Canberra,Dad served them in the large kitchen at the shop,and the boys sat around the table and laughed and talked to Dad while he cooked them steak and eggs on the fuel stove there. This was about 1942-43.

Mum was also instrumental in encouraging the Musical Society of Canberra to write to the A.B.C. in Sydney asking them to bring the Sydney Symphony Orchestra to Canberra which they did, and other cultural performances followed, including the concert given by the world famous Greek Soprano, Elena Nicholaides.

George and I went to Canberra High School where we joined the choir and took up sport, hockey for me and athletics for George. I took the part of the leading soprano in the Opera Dido and Aeneas and George sang in the choir,and as a result of this performance was invited to perform in the same role at the Armidale University. Mum came with me and sat proudly in the audience, thinking of the interest and love of music that she and Dad had fostered in us. Mum and Dad then sent me to board at Frensham at Mittagong,where I became the head of the choir and represented the school at Singing School Festivals in Sydney. Mum or Dad always came to Mittagong if I was in any concert at the school.

George and I went to Sydney University to study pharmacy (George had given up studying Dentistry in Melbourne as he realized that it wasn't for him) so we were together. We had found our apprenticeships,George with our Uncle Theo Lianos who was managing Christians Pharmacy in Kings Cross, and I spent the first year of my apprenticeship with Fred Rolfe in Queanbeyan and the balance at Paul Kelly's Pharmacy at Brookvale which was a long way from Coogee especially by public transport,and I travelled three hours a day - (very few students had cars in those days).

We had joined the Olympic Club when we came back to Sydney to study, and met many members whose parents knew our parents previously so we felt quite at home.We took part in many of the club's activities,the parties and competitions and talent quests .Joan Varvaressos and I were keen but friendly adversaries. Some I remembered were Big Con and Little Con Mottee, Nick Marcels, Stan Georgiadis, Con Papalexion, Toti Stanley, Nina Aikon and Bill Psaltis, to name of few. They also staged a Greek Comedy "Sproxenia which "brought the house down" when it was performed.

We boarded with a family in Coogee, Mrs Parsonage (a great cook)and her husband, who were very good to us. They allowed us to have a party when they went on holidays, (they were very trusting)so we invited friends that we had made at the club and some from the university. Mum drove down with the local fruiterer Kyriacos Calligeros, (who was going to the markets) and brought some food for the party (and to join in the fun of course). A good time was had by all and we sang and danced and talked till late. I remember Con Mottee and Areanthe Simos and many more who were there that great night.

At Uni, George and I joined the S.U.P.A. (Sydney University Pharmacy Association), and helped organise the Pharmacy Ball one year, which was a great success mainly due to George's boundless enthusiam. I was also elected the Pharmacy representative on the S.R.C (the Student's Representative Council), and captained the Pharmacy Hockey Team (we never won a match).

Also about this time a group of Greek descent undergraduates were brought together by Manuel Aroney to form the Sigma Epsilon Phi Chapter and we met fairly regularly and arranged a dinner in honour of His Emminence,Archbishop Iezekiel. It was another great success. Manuel, who was head of the steering committee acted as M.C. and three toasts were proposed by Andrew Coroneo (to the University), fourth year Medical student George Papadopoulos (to Sigma Epsilon Phi), and final year Law student Helen Gleeson (to Hellenism), and Pharmacist George Margetis moved the vote of appreciation to His Emminence, in Greek.

At about this time George and I had moved from Coogee to Kings Cross to a boarding house, The Oriana, (which later became the Rex Hotel and is now units). The other residents in the house were mostly elderly ladies,who liked us very much, and fussed over us and said prayers and lit candles at St Canice's Church when we having our exams.( Ilike to think that their prayers helped).

In the meantime Mum and Dad were working very hard In Canberra,as there were very few scholarships to the Uni, so all fees and books had to be paid for, as well as our board,and as pharmacy apprentices we were not allowed travel passes either even though our wage was a mere pittance. Dad constantly urged us to work hard to get along and at one stage, after we had written letters about our social activities and nothng else, he sent a very stern letter, saying that he was pleased we were having a good time !!!!!!,but what about our studies???????, and not to forget that he and Mum were working very hard for us. I still have that letter.

But Mum and Dad were still active in the Canberra Greek Community,with Dad helping many new migrants in Canberra to translate any documents they had,and in 1951 the Very Rev. Archbishop Theophylactos was aproached by the organisers of the forthcoming Women's Jubilee Convention to be held in Canberra in October of that year, to send two delegates from the Ladies Welfare Committee of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australasia. Mum was approached to be one of two delegates, the other being Mrs.K.Hood (Melides) from Sydney, and Mum was greatly honoured and accepted. Her paper referred to the trials that Greek migrant women suffered on coming to Australia, and ways and means that could be done to overcome them, and for Australian women to do their part in helping them to learn the Australian way of life, and eventually to integrate into the general community. The papers of both delegates were well received.

After KIngs Cross we moved to a house in South Coogee,where we studied for our Finals and where a group of students met two or three times for coaching by a pharmacy lecturer. George and I supplied supper,(sandwiches) and served tea from a very large crockery teapot that George had found somewhere that held seventeen cups of tea( which was just enough). George and I found some permanent work in Pharmacy,George at Kings Cross again and I worked for a time at Stevens Pharmacy at Surry Hills which was near the Agia Triatha in Bourke St. I then went home to Canberra to do relieving work in the country, and George did likewise. We were never lonely on these jobs, as all we had to do was to enter any Greek Milk Bar and tell the owners we were young Greek pharmacists away from home, and they opened their arms to us.

After we had finished our various jobs in the country, we both returned to Sydney and lived in MacMahons Point, and we found permanent work, George at the Cross again,and I at Bradford's Pharmacy in Wynyard Station.

Then in 1956 Dad received from Coles an offer to buy the shop. We were all thrilled and looked forward once more to be a family together. Mum and Dad packed up and moved in with us at MacMahons Point until we found a lovely unit to move into at Neutral Bay.

In the meantime Dad financed George and I to purchase two pharmacies,one in Waverley, and the other in Redfern which had a large Greek population. We then opened a pharmacy in Caltex House in Kent Sydney, which at that time,1958 was the tallest building at that end of town. Mum went there to work with an employed pharmacist. Dad went to help George at Redfern because of so many Greek customers, and I employed a cousin, Elaine Theodore to help me.

They were small businesses compared to those of to-day, but they did well although the shop at Waverley starting from scratch was slower but Dad was in his element. He had his family with him, and we went to concerts and parties together, and many of our friends included them in our invitations as well.

But he wasn't going to be satisfied until he had bought a house for us, which he did when he found one in Victory St. Rose Bay. We moved in July 1961 and each morning Dad got up early to go down and buy the daily paper, and go back home to read it in the front family room, which looked out to the beautiful Harbour, and he would say "I wouldn't call the King my Uncle."

But it wasn't to last and in November he went into hospital for an operation,and his pancreas burst and he passed away on the 12th November 1961. It was a dreadful shock to us and everyone. Mum, George and I were devastated too that Dad, having succeded at last in everything that he could wish for, was not allowed to enjoy it more. But at least he made it,and he was a great Dad, and we loved him very much and George and I were very grateful that we had those few happy years together as a family and I remember a comment made by one of Dad's cousins Jim Galanis, at the funeral, that he had never seen a man who was so happy with his family and proud of them too. For that remark we were thankful. And we put on his headstone:

TO LIVE IN THE HEARTS WE LEAVE BEHIND ,IS NOT TO DIE.

And that's where Dad will
always be.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 30.04.2012

Restaurant at 617 George St Sydney, owned by Bretos Margetis in the 1920s

I have written the Life Story of my father, which features in the Notable Kytherians section. My father was a Founding Member of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 1922. He was also on the organising Committtee of Ayia Triatha church in Surry Hills.

Bretos Margetis

24th November, 1889 - 12th November, 1961.

My father Bretos Margetis was named after his grandfather, who is pictured here with his daughters,and was probably born about 1850. His son George married Vasilia Galanis and they had three boys, Bretos, Dimitri and Minas, and three girls Maria,Panayiotitsa and Evangelia.

Dad was born on the 24th November 1889 in Aroniathika and went to the village school with his brothers and sisters and was a keen student. (Of interest is the origin of the name. It appears to come from the baptismal name of the mother (Margeta or Marieta),but was used as a nickname in the beginning but appears for the first time in the parish register of Saint Mina in Logothetianika in 1801, but was still regarded as a nickname. Also it appears that three members Margetis, came from Koropi (on the coast going to Sounion) two of whom settled in Araniathika where they added the name Aroney in order to register their origin. A century later it made an appearance in Chora. It appears that the present day family name, Margetis was originally a nickname of one branch of the large family Aroney of Aroniathika, but it was decided by the Prefects of Argolidos and Corinthias, that the family name Aroney be replaced by Margetis.
Apart from Kythera the family name is mentioned in Crete, and in an earlier period 1536 it is mentioned in a catalogue of conscripts from Chania, and in 1678 there is reference in Kefallinia to a painter of icons Christodoulos Margetis. These cases show that the family name Margetis has connections outside the region and are linked directly with Kythera.)

But to continue:
Judging by the photograph the men appear to be wearing their "Sunday Best", but life on the land was very hard,so their father decided that the boys had to seek a better life elsewhere, and chose Australia as they had relatives there already who would be able to help them.

[[picture:"00001B.jpg" ID:20323]]

George Margetis with his sons, from left to right, Minas, Bretos and Jim, taken in Greece, about 1902

Bretos was the first to go and arrived in Sydney on the 3rd of December 1903 on the ship Orizaba.He stayed with an Uncle (name unknown) and went to school, and learnt English quickly by reading the local newspapers and having a dictionary beside him to look up words he didn't understand. He was a good student and did well,even with language difficulties. When he left school he helped his Uncle in his business and managed to save money to send home to his family in Kythera. He continued saving as much as he could and by the time he was nineteen he had his first restaurant.

In 1915 he had to register with the government,and received a Certificate of Registration of Alien, under The War Precautions (Aliens Registration)Regulations 1916 and was finaly registered at a Police Station in Sydney. He then became active in the Kytherian Association, and was one of the founding members of the commitee,and was the Secretary 1924-1926.
Two of his sisters, Panayiotitsa (Bonney) and Evangalia, and his two brothers, Dimitri ( Uncle Jim) and Minas came to Australia, but Mina later returned to Greece to his parents and sister Maria.The girls married, Bonney to Vasili Georgopoulos who had been a chef at the royal court in Athens, and later opened the Athenian Restaurant in Castlreagh St., and Evangalia to Spiro Coroneo (Uncle Sam) who opened a business in Greenthorpe, south west, N.S.W. Uncle Jim never married because he was short and worried that he would have short children.

[[picture:"00001C.jpg" ID:20324]]

Bretos Margetis with one of his good friends in 1904 and 1922

Bretos opened a restaurant at 617 George St Sydney with white tablecloths on the tables and red velvet covered chairs. It was an "up market" restaurant and served three course meals for two and sixpence,which was expensive for those times. It is interesting to note that the shop next door was a Chemist Shop which may have given Dad the idea for his future children to become Pharmacists (which they did).

He developed a love for music, especially Opera,and took singing lessons with a Mrs Cresswell who taught him many songs from operas, but his favourite was La Donna Mobile wich he sang with great gusto at friends parties. Through this interest he met Theodora Lianos who was also a music lover,and had learnt to play the piano quite well,and soon there were wedding bells in the air and they married at the Agia Triatha in Surry Hills.

Dad had also bought two Picture Shows in Fairfield The Crescent and The Butterfly,and while he took care of the business in town,Mum travelled to Fairfield to manage the businesses out there.It was in Fairfield that Dad obtained his life long passion for cricket and in 1925 was asked by the Fairfield Cricket Club to be their Vice-President, which he accepted with pleasure.
But the Depression was still here and things were not going well in Australia and the rest of the world,and Dad had to close the restaurant at first,and later the Picture Shows, and so lost everything. But he was the eternal optimist,and always believed that when one door closed another one opened. He took jobs wherever he could find them and went to Parkes at one time, and back to Bondi, and was a cook in his brother-in-laws restaurant. He even opened a cake shop in Double Bay, the Niagara Cake Shop, but the economy was still bad, so he had to close it too. Then Dad was offered a job in Canberra with Harry Notaras and went there to try his luck.
At that time Mum,George and I lived in a flat in Double Bay and went to the Double Bay Public School (which is still there). Mum took a part-time job in a sweet factory, folding the little cardboard boxes that the sweets went in. Mum always made sure that she was home before we walked home from school and greeted us dressed as if she was going out.

Mum also arranged for George and I to have music lessons with Mrs Cresswell and paid for them by sewing dresses for her .When Mrs Cresswell came to give us our piano lessons she often heard me singing, and even though I was about eight years old, apart from teaching me the piano she taught me a few little songs, a couple of which I still remember.

I went on to the Wollahra Opportunity School and George went to Randwick Boys High School. Then Dad was offered the opportunity to buy one of the Notaras shops in Kingston which he accepted and at last at the age of Fifty-three he was on his way to start a new life at Victor's Rotary Cafe in Kingston Canberra,and he sent for his family to join him at last.

Once in Canberra Mum and Dad joined the Greek Community and became very active in promoting Greece by broadcasting and arranging programmes on special Greek Days, the 25th of March and the 28th 0f October on the radio station 2CA .George read speeches about these days,and I sang Greek Songs, and records of Greek music were also played. These were fairly well received by the general community there, but there was still a certain amount of xenophobia, even though Greece was fighting with the Allies.

Dad met many young men who were customers, who came to say goodbye to him when they leaving for the war in Europe and some kept in touch by letters. Some cadets from the nearby Duntroon Military College,would ring to say they were coming in the evening for a meal. Even though it was after hours in Canberra,Dad served them in the large kitchen at the shop,and the boys sat around the table and laughed and talked to Dad while he cooked them steak and eggs on the fuel stove there. This was about 1942-43.

Mum was also instrumental in encouraging the Musical Society of Canberra to write to the A.B.C. in Sydney asking them to bring the Sydney Symphony Orchestra to Canberra which they did, and other cultural performances followed, including the concert given by the world famous Greek Soprano, Elena Nicholaides.

George and I went to Canberra High School where we joined the choir and took up sport, hockey for me and athletics for George. I took the part of the leading soprano in the Opera Dido and Aeneas and George sang in the choir,and as a result of this performance was invited to perform in the same role at the Armidale University. Mum came with me and sat proudly in the audience, thinking of the interest and love of music that she and Dad had fostered in us. Mum and Dad then sent me to board at Frensham at Mittagong,where I became the head of the choir and represented the school at Singing School Festivals in Sydney. Mum or Dad always came to Mittagong if I was in any concert at the school.

George and I went to Sydney University to study pharmacy (George had given up studying Dentistry in Melbourne as he realized that it wasn't for him) so we were together. We had found our apprenticeships,George with our Uncle Theo Lianos who was managing Christians Pharmacy in Kings Cross,and I spent the first year of my apprenticeship with Fred Rolfe in Queanbeyan and the balance at Paul Kelly's Pharmacy at Brookvale which was a long way from Coogee especially by public transport,and I travelled three hours a day - (very few students had cars in those days).

We had joined the Olympic Club when we came back to Sydney to study, and met many members whose parents knew our parents previously so we felt quite at home.We took part in many of the club's activities,the parties and competitions and talent quests .Joan Varvaressos and I were keen but friendly adversaries. Some I remembered were Big Con and Little Con Mottee, Nick Marcels, Stan Georgiadis, Con Papalexion, Toti Stanley, Nina Aikonand Bill Psaltis, to name of few. They also staged a Greek Comedy "Sproxenia which "brought the house down" when it was performed.

We boarded with a family in Coogee, Mrs Parsonage (a great cook)and her husband, who were very good to us. They allowed us to have a party when they went on holidays, (they were very trusting)so we invited friends that we had made at the club and some from the university. Mum drove down with the local fruiterer Kyriacos Calligeros,
(who was going to the markets) and brought some food for the party (and to join in the fun of course). A good time was had by all and we sang and danced and talked till late. I remember Con Mottee and Areanthe Simos and many more who were there that great night.

At Uni, George and I joined the S.U.P.A.
(Sydney University Pharmacy Association), and helped organise the Pharmacy Ball one year, which was a great success mainly due to George's boundless enthusiam. I was also elected the Pharmacy representative on the S.R.C (the Student's Representative Council), and captained the Pharmacy Hockey Team (we never won a match).

Also about this time a group of Greek descent undergraduates were brought together by Manuel Aroney to form the Sigma Epsilon Phi Chapter and we met fairly regularly and arranged a dinner in honour of His Emminence,Archbishop Iezekiel. It was another great success. Manuel,who was head of the steering committee acted as M.C. and three toasts were proposed by Andrew Coroneo (to the University), fourth year Medical student George Papadopoulos(to Sigma Epsilon Phi), and final year Law student Helen Gleeson (to Hellenism), and Pharmacist George Margetis moved the vote of appreciation to His Emminence, in Greek.

At about this time George and I had moved from Coogee to Kings Cross to a boarding house, The Oriana, (which later became the Rex Hotel and is now units). The other residents in the house were mostly elderly ladies,who liked us very much, and fussed over us and said prayers and lit candles at St Canice's Church when we having our exams.( Ilike to think that their prayers helped).
In the meantime Mum and Dad were working very hard In Canberra,as there were very few scholarships to the Uni,so all fees and books had to be paid for,as well as our board,and as pharmacy apprentices we were not allowed travel passes either even though our wage was a mere pittance.Dad constantly urged us to work hard to get along and at one stage,after we had written letters about our social activities and nothng else,he sent a very stern letter ,saying that he was pleased we were having a good time !!!!!!,but what about our studies???????,and not to forget that he and Mum were working very hard for us .I still have that letter.
But Mum and Dad were still active in the Canberra Greek Community,with Dad helping many new migrants in Canberra to translate any documents they had,and in 1951 the Very Rev.Archbishop Theophylactos was aproached by the organisers of the forthcoming Women's Jubilee Convention to be held in Canberra in October of that year, to send two delegates from the Ladies Welfare Committee of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australasia. Mum was approached to be one of two delegates,the other being Mrs.K.Hood (Melides)from Sydney,and Mum was greatly honoured and accepted. Her paper referred to the trials that Greek migrant women suffered on coming to Australia,and ways and means that could be done to overcome them,and for Australian women to do their part in helping them to learn the Australian way of life,and eventually to integrate into the general community.The papers of both delegates were well rceived.
After KIngs Cross we moved to a house in South Coogee,where we studied for our Finals and where a group of students met two or three times for coaching by a pharmacy lecturer. George and I supplied supper,(sandwiches) and served tea from a very large crockery teapot that George had found somewhere that held seventeen cups of tea( which was just enough). George and I found some permanent work in Pharmacy,George at Kings Cross again and I worked for a time at Stevens Pharmacy at Surry Hills which was near the Agia Triatha in Bourke St. I then went home to Canberra to do relieving work in the country, and George did likewise. We were never lonely on these jobs, as all we had to do was to enter any Greek Milk Bar and tell the owners we were young Greek pharmacists away from home, and they opened their arms to us.

After we had finished our various jobs in the country, we both returned to Sydney and lived in MacMahons Point, and we found permanent work, George at the Cross again,and I at Bradford's Pharmacy in Wynyard Station.

Then in 1956 Dad received from Coles an offer to buy the shop. We were all thrilled and looked forward once more to be a family together. Mum and Dad packed up and moved in with us at MacMahons Point until we found a lovely unit to move into at Neutral Bay.

In the meantime Dad financed George and I to purchase two pharmacies,one in Waverley, and the other in Redfern which had a large Greek population. We then opened a pharmacy in Caltex House in Kent Sydney, which at that time,1958 was the tallest building at that end of town. Mum went there to work with an employed pharmacist. Dad went to help George at Redfern because of so many Greek customers, and I employed a cousin, Elaine Theodore to help me.

They were small businesses compared to those of to-day, but they did well although the shop at Waverley starting from scratch was slower but Dad was in his element. He had his family with him, and we went to concerts and parties together, and many of our friends included them in our invitations as well.

But he wasn't going to be satisfied until he had bought a house for us, which he did when he found one in Victory St. Rose Bay. We moved in July 1961 and each morning Dad got up early to go down and buy the daily paper, and go back home to read it in the front family room,which looked out to the beautiful Harbour,and he would say "I wouldn't call the King my Uncle."
But it wasn't to last and in November he went into hospital for an operation,and his pancreas burst and he passed away on the 12th November 1961. It was a dreadful shock to us and everyone. Mum, George and I were devastated too that Dad, having succeded at last in everything that he could wish for,was not allowed to enjoy it more. But at least he made it,and he was a great Dad, and we loved him very much and George and I were very grateful that we had those few happy years together as a family and I remember a comment made by one of Dad's cousins Jim Galanis,at the funeral, that he had never seen a man who was so happy with his family and proud of them too. For that remark we were thankful.And we put on his headstone:

TO LIVE IN THE HEARTS WE LEAVE BEHIND ,IS NOT TO DIE.

And that's where Dad will
always be.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 22.04.2012

Theo Crithary (Theodoros Kritharis)

The entry for the Kritharis and Tzorztopoulos brothers on Page 147, Life in Australia, (1916), which includes Theo Crithary reads:

Kritharis & Tzortzopoulos brothers

1) Theodoros Kritharis, (Theo Crithary) 2) Theodoros Tzortzopoulos, (theo Poulos) 3) Minas Tzortzopoulos, (Mick Poulos) 4) Panagiotis Kritharis (Peter Crithary)

View / download a copy of page 147 here:

LIA English 147.pdf

Two splendid and extremely profitable shops, located in the city of Glenn Innes, in New South Wales, do worthy honour to the Greek name. The shops, both of which stand on the central streets of the city, are run by the young and ambitious brothers Messrs. Theodoros and Panayiotis Kritharis, sons of Evangelos Kritharis, and their cousins, Messrs. Minas and Theodoros Tzortzopoulos (Poulos), all of whom hail from the island of Kythera.

All of them belong to the small group of Greeks who, within a short period since their arrival in Australia, have achieved sudden and remarkable progress. Moreover, these distinguished members of the Greek race are shareholders in the motor transport company operating between Inverell and Glen Innes. Working, as they do, in an extraordinary spirit of harmony and love, they have managed, within a short time, to gain a place among the most well-established Greeks in Australia. Mr Theodoros Kritharis also happens to have made donations to the hospitals of Glenn Innes.

The Crithary and Tzortzopoulos brothers ran the two shops in Glen Innes in partnership.

Theo Crithary standing outside his shop in Glen Innes

Later Theo established a food supply business called Embros ("Forward"). He claimed to be the first importer of ouzo into Australia, sellling it in several hotels; he also sold Greek olives to Woolworths.

Theo Crithary was a literary and philosophical man. In 1923 he tried, without success, to bring together, the disunited Greeks of Sydney.

Mr Theo Crithary solved the puzzle

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 08.10.2012

Farewell party for Bishop Nikodimos, 1938

The function was held in the upstairs area of the Sydney Cafe, 735 George Street, which was then owned by Emmanuel Mavromatis, who is depicted in the photograph.

I have numbered the attendees to this function in another photograph. The numbers in this entry refer to the numbers used there.

The function was held in the upstairs area of the Sydney Cafe, 735 George Street, which was then owned by Emmanuel Mavromatis, who is depicted in the photograph.

Now that we have named all of the attendees, can you tell us more about their lives? By some chance, are you a descendant of one or more of the persons in this photograph?

1 Coralie Lianos (Daughter of George, (no 10))

2 Mary Simos, (nee, Panaretos), Paragon Cafe, Katoomba (wife of Zacharias, no 16)

3 Irene Castrissios

4 Ninette Mavromatis (Wife of George, no 21)

5 Theodora Margetis (Wife of Bretos (no 7), and daughter of George, (no 10))

6 Aspasia Sophios (Wife of Nicholas (no 8), and daughter of George, (no 10))

7 Bretos Margetis, founding member, Kytherian Association of Australia. Husband of Theodora (no 5)

8 Nicholas Sophios (Husband od Aspasia, (no 6))

9 Bishop Nikodimos An archimandrite* priest. Upon returning to Greece he was shot and killed by the 'ardutes' during the Second World War.

10 George Lianos (father of Coralie (no1), Theodora (no 5), and Aspasia (no 6)

11 George Cominos, Vice-President of the Kytherian Association of Australia, 1926-1928, and long standing Committee person during the 1930's

12 Peter Aroney (Husband of Mrs Aroney (no 22)

13 Mr Melitas (husband of Mrs Melitas (no 18))

14 Mr Xenedes (husband to Mrs Xenedes (no 20))

15 Arthur Catrissios, Bega (later retired to Manly, Sydney)

16 Zacharios Simos, Paragon Cafe, Katoomba Husband of Mary, (no 2)

17 Elias Bezannes, owner of the Bhema newspaper at the time.

18 Mrs Melitas (wife of Mr Melitas (no 4))

19 Tassia Trefili

20 Mrs Xenedes (Wife to Mr Xenedes (no 14))

21 George Mavromatis, (husband of Ninette (no 4))

22 Mrs Aroney (wife of Peter Aroney (no 12))

23 Chrysanthi Mavromatis (nee, Aroney, wife of Emmanuel)

24 Emmanuel Mavromatis** - owner of the Sydney Cafe, and long standing Treasurer of the Kytherian Association of Australia in the 1920's and 1930's.

* An archimandrite (literally, "chief of a sheepfold") is a celibate priest who has been elevated to an honorific rank, one level lower than bishop.

**Emmanuel Mavromatis (the family name was changed to Mathers), served as the Treasurer of the Kytherain Association for ten years from 1928-1938 - the critical ten years in view of the impact of the impact of the Depression on Australia. He remained on the Committee in 1939-1940, and undertook the role of Treasurer again from 1940-1944. This was a prolonged period of active service on behalf of the Kytherian Brotherhood / Association.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Theo Notaras on 20.04.2012

Paragon Cafe Tenterfield 1938-40 (Frank & Matina Notaras Photo Collection)

Left to right.

Theo Tzortopoulos, Irene Tzortzopoulos,Nicholas Tzortopoulos, Matina Tzortzopulos later Notaras.

The rest unknown

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Theo Notaras on 20.04.2012

Liberty Cafe Canberra post WW2( Frank & Matina Notaras Photo collection )

John ? standing on the left.

Frank Notaras on the right.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Theo Notaras on 20.04.2012

Liberty Cafe pre WW2 (Frank & Matina Notaras Photo Collection.)

Spero Gavrilly standing on the left.

Frank Notaras Standing on the right.

Katina Gavrilly ( Notaras ) in the background.

Circa 1939-40 pre WW2

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 20.04.2012

The entry for the Kritharis and Tzorztopoulos brothers on Page 147, Life in Australia, (1916), which includes Theo Crithary reads:

1) Theodoros Kritharis, (Theo Crithary) 2) Theodoros Tzortzopoulos, (theo Poulos) 3) Minas Tzortzopoulos, (Mick Poulos) 4) Panagiotis Kritharis (Peter Crithary)

View / download a copy of page 147 here:

LIA English 147.pdf

Two splendid and extremely profitable shops, located in the city of Glenn Innes, in New South Wales, do worthy honour to the Greek name. The shops, both of which stand on the central streets of the city, are run by the young and ambitious brothers Messrs. Theodoros and Panayiotis Kritharis, sons of Evangelos Kritharis, and their cousins, Messrs. Minas and Theodoros Tzortzopoulos (Poulos), all of whom hail from the island of Kythera.

All of them belong to the small group of Greeks who, within a short period since their arrival in Australia, have achieved sudden and remarkable progress. Moreover, these distinguished members of the Greek race are shareholders in the motor transport company operating between Inverell and Glen Innes. Working, as they do, in an extraordinary spirit of harmony and love, they have managed, within a short time, to gain a place among the most well-established Greeks in Australia. Mr Theodoros Kritharis also happens to have made donations to the hospitals of Glenn Innes.

Theo Crithary standing outside his shop in Glen Innes

Theo Crithary was a literary and philosophical man. In 1923 he tried, without success, to bring together, the disunited Greeks of Sydney.

Mr Theo Crithary solved the puzzle

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George S Venardos on 20.04.2012

Peters & Co, shop, Grey Street Glen Innes, NSW

Designated as a Fish & Oyster Saloon Confectioner & Fruiterers.

Owned by Theo and Peter Crithary. (Theo is almost certainly the prominent figure in the centre of this photograph).

To be confirmed are the other 3 adults and two young boys in the photograph.

They may include - Leonidas Gengos, Nicholas P Aroney, Spiro Coroneos, Theo George Poulos, Michael (Tzortzo)Poulos,Theo (Tzortzo)Poulos.

See also page 147 of Life in Australia for the Kritharis and Tzortzopoulos brothers entry.

Page 147, Life in Australia, (1916).

1) Theodoros Kritharis, (Theo Crithary) 2) Theodoros Tzortzopoulos, (theo Poulos) 3) Minas Tzortzopoulos, (Mick Poulos) 4) Panagiotis Kritharis (Peter Crithary)

View / download a copy of page 147 here:

LIA English 147.pdf

Two splendid and extremely profitable shops, located in the city of Glenn Innes, in New South Wales, do worthy honour to the Greek name. The shops, both of which stand on the central streets of the city, are run by the young and ambitious brothers Messrs. Theodoros and Panayiotis Kritharis, sons of Evangelos Kritharis, and their cousins, Messrs. Minas and Theodoros Tzortzopoulos (Poulos), all of whom hail from the island of Kythera.

All of them belong to the small group of Greeks who, within a short period since their arrival in Australia, have achieved sudden and remarkable progress. Moreover, these distinguished members of the Greek race are shareholders in the motor transport company operating between Inverell and Glen Innes. Working, as they do, in an extraordinary spirit of harmony and love, they have managed, within a short time, to gain a place among the most well-established Greeks in Australia. Mr Theodoros Kritharis also happens to have made donations to the hospitals of Glenn Innes.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by NSW Heritage on 27.03.2012

Looking after the Shop

Ways to document, care for and interpret our shopping heritage

The changing nature and needs of small businesses mean that many of our older shops and their contents face an uncertain future. There are different ways of caring for our shopping heritage, depending on the circumstances of the particular business and owner, and the local opportunities available to those wanting to look after it.

Perhaps it is your own shop. Perhaps it is a much loved or historically significant local shop that is to be sold, and the precious shelves and counters, equipment and furniture are likely to be removed and sold off too. The shop owner might be intending to ‘clean up’, modernise or refurbish, or perhaps the owner is elderly and the future of the shop is uncertain.

How can we bring this rich and colourful history with us into the twenty-first century? The following sections explain how to go about determining what is significant about a shop, and what actions will help to look after it.

• Staying open for business

• Recording the contents

• Understanding significance

• Keeping collections in place

• Making a plan

• Making changes

• Caring for collections

• Putting shops on show

Download and read the rest of this document as a .pdf:

A_Lot_In_Store_ch5.pdf