kythera family kythera family
  

Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

Showing 261 - 280 from 1116 entries
Show: sorted by:

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Sunday Telegraph on 05.11.2012

History gets a real shake as it is 80 years today since a first milk bar opened

• by: MELISSA MATHESON
• From: The Sunday Telegraph
• November 04, 2012

Photograph: Emma Kavanagh makes a milkshake. Picture Toby Zerna Source The Daily Telegraph


It marked the start of the "milkshake revolution" - the opening of Sydney's first milk bar triggered a lasting love affair with the mouth-watering drink.
Now, 80 years on, the "old-fashioned" corner store is still a one-stop shop for many, with the milkshake holding its own against a variety of beverages.

In the golden days, the milkshake was promoted as "health food", with its combination of milk, chocolate, dried fruit and essence.

Macquarie University historian Leonard Janiszewski said the Black and White Milk Bar opened in Martin Place in November, 1932, and soon there were 4000 milk bars in Australia.

"The most popular was the bootlegger punch milkshake and it basically had a dash of rum essence in it.

"This was the Depression, and the majority of working people in the cities and towns were men, not women. The majority of them would go to the pub, but it was much cheaper to go to the milk bar."

It all started with Joachim Tavlaridis, a Greek migrant better known as Mick Adams, who opened a chain of Black and White Milk Bars across the country after adopting the US model of "pomp and ceremony" for store openings.

Mr Janiszewski credits him with introducing a new form of quick economics to food production, which saw the milk bar craze spread to New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

"He had a magical cow with calf in the front window and you could pump milk from it, which was really white-coloured oil," he said.
"He had to extend the milk bar within two weeks of opening and every two hours they had to deliver milk."

While the Black and White store no longer exists, many of Sydney's historic milk bars are still serving customers after more than half a century.

Tim Downs and Doug Battye bought Parry's Milk Bar in Caringbah in 2004. It had previously been run for almost 40 years by Peter and Bill Cassimatis.

"I had one of my first dates here when I was 15 or 16," Mr Downs said.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Sunday Telegraph on 05.11.2012

History gets a real shake as it is 80 years today since a first milk bar opened

• by: MELISSA MATHESON
• From: The Sunday Telegraph
• November 04, 2012

Photograph: The Black & White Milk Bar in Martin Place. Source: The Daily Telegraph


It marked the start of the "milkshake revolution" - the opening of Sydney's first milk bar triggered a lasting love affair with the mouth-watering drink.
Now, 80 years on, the "old-fashioned" corner store is still a one-stop shop for many, with the milkshake holding its own against a variety of beverages.

In the golden days, the milkshake was promoted as "health food", with its combination of milk, chocolate, dried fruit and essence.

Macquarie University historian Leonard Janiszewski said the Black and White Milk Bar opened in Martin Place in November, 1932, and soon there were 4000 milk bars in Australia.

"The most popular was the bootlegger punch milkshake and it basically had a dash of rum essence in it.

"This was the Depression, and the majority of working people in the cities and towns were men, not women. The majority of them would go to the pub, but it was much cheaper to go to the milk bar."

It all started with Joachim Tavlaridis, a Greek migrant better known as Mick Adams, who opened a chain of Black and White Milk Bars across the country after adopting the US model of "pomp and ceremony" for store openings.

Mr Janiszewski credits him with introducing a new form of quick economics to food production, which saw the milk bar craze spread to New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

"He had a magical cow with calf in the front window and you could pump milk from it, which was really white-coloured oil," he said.
"He had to extend the milk bar within two weeks of opening and every two hours they had to deliver milk."

While the Black and White store no longer exists, many of Sydney's historic milk bars are still serving customers after more than half a century.

Tim Downs and Doug Battye bought Parry's Milk Bar in Caringbah in 2004. It had previously been run for almost 40 years by Peter and Bill Cassimatis.

"I had one of my first dates here when I was 15 or 16," Mr Downs said.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 04.11.2012

Art Deco fret work on the walls of the Roxy theatre, Bingara, NSW

Big screen, big dreams for a night at the Roxy

Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday, November 3, 2012

Megan Johnston

Photo: Rachel Meszaros


In 1936, three men from a Greek island took a gamble in country NSW and decided the little town of Bingara - population 1500 - needed a cinema complex.

Yet despite the new big screen, it was their revamped cafe that proved to be the drawcard.

In an era when pubs were a man's dominion and fast-food outlets were yet to line the state's roads, families would turn up at the new Roxy cafe after the hot, bumpy drive from Tamworth, looking for relief.

''You can only imagine [what it was like] when you arrived in town in a very uncomfortable non-air-conditioned car in the middle of summer and you were parched,'' said Sandy McNaughton, who manages the Roxy.

The original complex didn't generate the fortunes its owners had hoped for. The early entrepreneurs from the island of Kythera went bust five months after the project was finished.

In the 1960s, the premises were turned into a memorabilia shop and, later, into a Chinese restaurant. But now the cafe, restored to its art deco glory, is back in business.

''Old people walk in and they touch the booths - you can see their hair standing up,'' said the cafe's new Romanian-born manager, Vio Nedianu, who has run the venue with his wife, Ayesha, since it reopened in June. ''It looks exactly what it used to look like.''

Greek cafes swept across rural Australia in the middle of the last century, serving up mixed grills and American sundaes and sodas. ''The Greeks really transformed Australia's culinary and cultural landscape,'' Ms McNaughton said.

''Prior to the Greek cafes there really wasn't anywhere families could go. You could only get meals at certain hours served in the pubs and inns. If you arrived in town and it was before or after the opening or closing times of the kitchens, you literally couldn't get anything to eat.''

Even during the Depression, locals would make an effort to visit the cafe.''Coming into town was quite an occasion,'' Ms McNaughton said. ''[One man told] me that when he was growing up in the '30s they had nothing to eat and once a month his father would ride the horse 30 kilometres to the neighbouring property to borrow the neighbour's car to take the family into town.''

The theatre next door was restored and reopened its doors to patrons eight years ago and when the Gwydir Shire Council bought the Roxy cafe in 2008, it did so with similar plans to return the site to its art deco glory.

With funding from government and private donors, Ms McNaughton and her team have restored the original wood panelling and booths, and salvaged a neon sign from a nearby property. The geometric terrazzo floors were also uncovered.

Missing pieces - a counter, soda fountain and display cabinets - were sourced from a similar cafe in Inverell and the etched glass facade was reproduced from the originals.

But customers craving a taste of the Aegean might be disappointed by one detail of authenticity. In keeping with the original owners, Mr Nedianu never serves Greek food.

''People say, 'But this is a Greek cafe', and I say, 'I know, [but] this is Australia'.''

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 04.11.2012

Vio Nedianu and his wife, Ayesha with five of their children. The couple run the Roxy caf

Big screen, big dreams for a night at the Roxy

Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday, November 3, 2012

Megan Johnston

Photo: Rachel Meszaros


In 1936, three men from a Greek island took a gamble in country NSW and decided the little town of Bingara - population 1500 - needed a cinema complex.

Yet despite the new big screen, it was their revamped cafe that proved to be the drawcard.

In an era when pubs were a man's dominion and fast-food outlets were yet to line the state's roads, families would turn up at the new Roxy cafe after the hot, bumpy drive from Tamworth, looking for relief.

''You can only imagine [what it was like] when you arrived in town in a very uncomfortable non-air-conditioned car in the middle of summer and you were parched,'' said Sandy McNaughton, who manages the Roxy.

The original complex didn't generate the fortunes its owners had hoped for. The early entrepreneurs from the island of Kythera went bust five months after the project was finished.

In the 1960s, the premises were turned into a memorabilia shop and, later, into a Chinese restaurant. But now the cafe, restored to its art deco glory, is back in business.

''Old people walk in and they touch the booths - you can see their hair standing up,'' said the cafe's new Romanian-born manager, Vio Nedianu, who has run the venue with his wife, Ayesha, since it reopened in June. ''It looks exactly what it used to look like.''

Greek cafes swept across rural Australia in the middle of the last century, serving up mixed grills and American sundaes and sodas. ''The Greeks really transformed Australia's culinary and cultural landscape,'' Ms McNaughton said.

''Prior to the Greek cafes there really wasn't anywhere families could go. You could only get meals at certain hours served in the pubs and inns. If you arrived in town and it was before or after the opening or closing times of the kitchens, you literally couldn't get anything to eat.''

Even during the Depression, locals would make an effort to visit the cafe.''Coming into town was quite an occasion,'' Ms McNaughton said. ''[One man told] me that when he was growing up in the '30s they had nothing to eat and once a month his father would ride the horse 30 kilometres to the neighbouring property to borrow the neighbour's car to take the family into town.''

The theatre next door was restored and reopened its doors to patrons eight years ago and when the Gwydir Shire Council bought the Roxy cafe in 2008, it did so with similar plans to return the site to its art deco glory.

With funding from government and private donors, Ms McNaughton and her team have restored the original wood panelling and booths, and salvaged a neon sign from a nearby property. The geometric terrazzo floors were also uncovered.

Missing pieces - a counter, soda fountain and display cabinets - were sourced from a similar cafe in Inverell and the etched glass facade was reproduced from the originals.

But customers craving a taste of the Aegean might be disappointed by one detail of authenticity. In keeping with the original owners, Mr Nedianu never serves Greek food.

''People say, 'But this is a Greek cafe', and I say, 'I know, [but] this is Australia'.''

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 04.11.2012

Big screen, big dreams for a night at the Roxy

Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday, November 3, 2012

Megan Johnston

Photograph: The cafe refurbishment includes the original wood panelling, booths and neon sign salvaged from a nearby property and geometric terrazzo floors, which were discovered beneath carpet. Missing pieces such as a counter, soda fountain and display cabinets were sourced from a similar cafe in Inverell and window reproductions were copied from the damaged originals. Photo: Rachel Meszaros


In 1936, three men from a Greek island took a gamble in country NSW and decided the little town of Bingara - population 1500 - needed a cinema complex.

Yet despite the new big screen, it was their revamped cafe that proved to be the drawcard.

In an era when pubs were a man's dominion and fast-food outlets were yet to line the state's roads, families would turn up at the new Roxy cafe after the hot, bumpy drive from Tamworth, looking for relief.

''You can only imagine [what it was like] when you arrived in town in a very uncomfortable non-air-conditioned car in the middle of summer and you were parched,'' said Sandy McNaughton, who manages the Roxy.

The original complex didn't generate the fortunes its owners had hoped for. The early entrepreneurs from the island of Kythera went bust five months after the project was finished.

In the 1960s, the premises were turned into a memorabilia shop and, later, into a Chinese restaurant. But now the cafe, restored to its art deco glory, is back in business.

''Old people walk in and they touch the booths - you can see their hair standing up,'' said the cafe's new Romanian-born manager, Vio Nedianu, who has run the venue with his wife, Ayesha, since it reopened in June. ''It looks exactly what it used to look like.''

Greek cafes swept across rural Australia in the middle of the last century, serving up mixed grills and American sundaes and sodas. ''The Greeks really transformed Australia's culinary and cultural landscape,'' Ms McNaughton said.

''Prior to the Greek cafes there really wasn't anywhere families could go. You could only get meals at certain hours served in the pubs and inns. If you arrived in town and it was before or after the opening or closing times of the kitchens, you literally couldn't get anything to eat.''

Even during the Depression, locals would make an effort to visit the cafe.''Coming into town was quite an occasion,'' Ms McNaughton said. ''[One man told] me that when he was growing up in the '30s they had nothing to eat and once a month his father would ride the horse 30 kilometres to the neighbouring property to borrow the neighbour's car to take the family into town.''

The theatre next door was restored and reopened its doors to patrons eight years ago and when the Gwydir Shire Council bought the Roxy cafe in 2008, it did so with similar plans to return the site to its art deco glory.

With funding from government and private donors, Ms McNaughton and her team have restored the original wood panelling and booths, and salvaged a neon sign from a nearby property. The geometric terrazzo floors were also uncovered.

Missing pieces - a counter, soda fountain and display cabinets - were sourced from a similar cafe in Inverell and the etched glass facade was reproduced from the originals.

But customers craving a taste of the Aegean might be disappointed by one detail of authenticity. In keeping with the original owners, Mr Nedianu never serves Greek food.

''People say, 'But this is a Greek cafe', and I say, 'I know, [but] this is Australia'.''

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by The Roxy Complex on 20.10.2012

Article on the Tenterfield area, with reference to the Roxy complex, Bingara

Virgin Australia voyeur

Magazine, October 2012, Issue 135

pp. 62-66

AN ODE TO AUSTRALIA


In the towns, in the rustling of the trees and across the valley of northern NSW, you hear them - tales of man and country, as told through the verses of some of Australia's greatest poets.

Words: Catherine Marshall

The hills in northern New South Wales are stitched together with stories and populated by ghosts. They hum with the poetry of Banjo Patterson, who wooed a girl from Tenterfield, and stood alongside other Australian literary greats, William Ogilvie and Henry Lawson; they whisper the legend of Captain Thunderbolt, who stalked the gold diggers of Walcha stealing from the unwary and enticing the ladies with his charms; they reverberate with the tales or pioneers who travelled from Sydney and fanned out across this elevated hinterland, planting crops, opening cafes, digging up gold and putting down roots.

POETRY IN MOTION

"You've gotta like granite to live here," says Kevin Santin as we rattle along the road that winds through Bald Rock National Park just outside Tenterfield. Granite boulders litter this place and presiding over them all is Australia's largest granite chunk, Bald Rock, a weather-streaked monolith that stares out towards the brooding hills almost marking the border between New South Wales and Queensland.

Santin grew up nearby, but moved back only recently after half a lifetime away. Together with his wife Jenny, he's transformed the 100 year old Tenterfield Holiday Luxury Cottage - 121 Rouse St - www.tenterfieldcottage.com.au - into a bed and breakfast and settled back down Into the folds of a landscape he knows so well. I love it here; the climate, the beauty and the granite," he says.

Gazing across this rocky landscape, one can easily envisage the swagman from Paterson's Walzing Matilda setting up camp beneath a coolibah tree, putting his billy on to boil and eyeing out a fat woolly sheep as it picks its way through the rocks. This place may well have inspired Australia's most famous bush ballad, for its author spent much time here wooing his bride, Alice Walker of Tenterfield Station. The couple met when Patterson gave a talk in the local town hall; they married in the little wooden St Stephen's Presbyterian Church on Logan Street, which still stands today.

“He was a great horseman of course, so they'd pick out the best for him and they would go down to Boonoo Boonoo (pronounced bunna bannoo) and hunt," says John Sommerlad, who was born and raised in Tenterfield. One of his prized possessions is a copy of The Ballad of Boonoo Boonoo, which Paterson wrote after one such jaunt. “They'd come back and have lunch or afternoon tea, and he'd scribble out a poem for them. He'd just give us a gift.”

MIGRANT TALES

Paterson 's gift is revived each autumn when modern day bush poets gather in Tenterfield to take part in the Oracles of the Bush Festival (www.oraclesofthebush.com), evoking in their own words the idiosyncrasies that bring this place to life. It’s a region infused with tales like that of Santin's grandfather who left behind a wife and five children when he moved here from Italy in the 1920s. “He came to the land of milk and honey, and it took him 10 years to save up enough money to bring the family out.” Santin says, “My father was two when his father left Italy in 1928, and he didn't see him again until 1938.”

Most Italian immigrants stayed away from Tenterfield, with its supposedly good-for-nothlng soil, moving across the border to Stanthorpe instead, where their market gardens could flourish. But the Greek immigrants saw potential everywhere and set up cafes in little towns all over northern New South Wales. In Tenterfield Greek cafes very quickly outnumbered those run by Australians.

Today all traces of them has disappeared bar the shell of the old Paragon Cafe and the photos that tell a story all their own: the young employees, circa 1922, wearing white jackets an starched collars.”

There are some architectural gems that have managed to evade the ravages of time, such as the Eclipse Theatre, a faded art deco monument that stands proud and resolute in the tiny parish of Deepwater, and The Roxy Theatre & Greek Cafe (74 Maitland St, Bingara; www.roxybingara.com.au), a classic neon-fronted establishment built by Greek migrants back In 1936. lt closed in 1958 and lay dormant for 40 years.

Sandy McNaughton, the current manager of the Roxy, is overseeing the installation of a museum here that will document the contributions of the Greek community to rural Australian life. “This place epitomises the story of Greek immigration to New South Wales and southern Queensland. It made such an impact on Australia's culinary and cultural landscape,” she says.

LAND OF PLENTY

Tenterfield's landscape is also shaped by bushrangers runaway convicts and career criminals who survived by living off the land and stealing from t he local communities, and whose daring and recklessness often earnt them a grudging respect. Plus there were the many miners and drovers who dared to take on this untamed countryside. In the gullies around the area you can sometimes find empty opium bottles discarded by the Chinese miners who travelled to this part of Australia to seek their fortune.

“They’re empty of course!” chuckles Lynton Rhodes, a lifelong resident of this region. “The story goes that a lot of the gold was [smuggled] back to China in the bodies of dead miners.” Rhodes relates this :anecdote on the deck of his cellar door and restaurant at Kurrajong Downs Wines (Casino Rd. Tenterfield; +61 2 6736 4590; www.kurrajongdownswines.com), north of Tenterfield proper. From here, sample a local drop or two as you gaze past the beautiful old angophora tree and all the way down a valley that was once peppered with mines. The mines all gone now, but Rhodes, who also farms cattle, continues to extract the land's minerals.
“Blue granite is the best country out here for growing cattle - there's more body in the grass. You get tons of it around Tenterfield,” he explains. “And if there's a good profile of moisture there, the vines don't need much irrigation.”

This area produces cool-climate wines. The product of a slow maturation process. Their names, similarly, tell the story of a people and the land which wrought them: the Louisa Mary Semillon commemorates Rhodes's great aunt who died at the age of three and was carried from Sandy Hills to the mining town of Timbarra to be buried in its cemetery; while the All Nations, a pinot noir, takes its name from the pub at which the locals would gather each night. “People came from all over the world to try and get a strike. If they failed here they'd go to the next strike. It would have been a very interesting place to have been in those times,” says Rhodes.

All that's left of Timbarra now is a pile of foundation stones and Tenterfield Station lies desolate and overgrown. But the people who once lived here have left behind their stories: they flow off the tongues of local and bush poets; they warp the shelves of the Book Market in Glen Innes (245 Grey St; www.thebookmarket.com.au): Paterson’s High Country, Keith Garvey's Night of the Dingo, and Other Stories, and Wilbur Howcroft's, Omnibus, all stuffed full of bush stories and poems and songs. And they whistle softly through the vines, the angophora leaves and the tumbledown farmhouses in the dead of night, when nobody is awake to heart them.

GETTING THERE

To book your holiday to Tenterfield, visit www.virginaustralia.com or simply call 13 67 89 (in Australia).


Banjo Paterson, The Ballad of Boonoo Boonoo

Yes this is the ballad of Boonoo Boonoo,
Where the hills are green and the skies are blue;
And if you're fond of timber tall,
Or would like to see a waterfall,
That's a thousand feet from top to toe,
And hear the waters as down they go.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Roxy Theatre, Bingara, NSW on 28.09.2012

New video about the Roxy, Bingara, on youtube

See the new video about the 75th anniversary celebrations of the Roxy theatre in Bingara, NSW and the reopening of Peters Cafe next door.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr7vZ1m7naY&feature=youtu.be

Greg Punch filmed the material in April 2011. He has now edited it. It is an excellent brief overview.

Many thanks to Greg, and Newtown Flicks for creating this video.

View other videos about the Roxy at this space.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 12.07.2012

6° of separation. The Gwydir-Willoughby Council sister city relationship

Gwydir Council, and Willoughby Council in Sydney have a sister-city relationship.

Mandy Stevens has served on Willoughby Council for a number of terms, and a number of years.

Mandy is a SOPHIOS, from Kythera, with LIANOS family connections, by heritage. But before she tripped up to Bingara for the July 4th, 2012, celebrations, as a part of her duties with Willoughby she was oblivious of the significant 'Kytherian' history in the town of Bingara, and in the Roxy 'complex' and Roxy cafe.

Nor was she aware that it was George C Poulos who was helping her cousin Vasi Uhrweiss (nee, Margetis / Lianos), re-construct the Lianos family history.

Mandy and George thus had a great deal to talk about at the celebration.

Here they are photographed outside the Council Chambers in Bingara.

This occasion coincided with the annual Orange Festival, the 150th Anniversary of the opening of the Bingara Public School, and the 're-opening' of the Roxy Cafe - after 46 years.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

The event also attracts many vintage bikes

Here, Inverell-resident, Roxyphile, Greek-Australian, long term cafe proprietor, and 'easy rider', Peter Giannes sits astride his classical Harley Davidson.

Peter restores Harley's and Vesper's as a hobby.

He also loves to 'ride'.

Photo taken on Saturday 4th July.

On the weekend of the re-opening of the Roxy Cafe, Bingara.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Also the weekend of the annual Orange Festival, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

The Rouge Coffee 'hut' - outside the Roxy Cafe Bingara

Saturday 4th July.

A lot of Rouge coffee was sold in the weekend and the week of the opening of the Roxy cafe.

Vio and Ayesha and five of their eight children - Amira, Zacharia, Ramona, Latifa and Hercules - have left Brisbane and their family Italian ristorante behind to make a new home in the town known as the ‘Gem of the New England’.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

Numerous stalls adorned the full length of Binagara's main street

on the day of the Orange Festival.

The Orange Festival is an annual institution in Bingara.

This year it coincided with the 're-opening' of the Roxy Cafe - after 46 years.

This stall adjoined the street to the right of the Roxy Cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

The Orange Festival Parade rounds the corner at the Roxy 'complex' intersection

The Orange Festival is an annual institution in Bingara.

This year it coincided with the 're-opening' of the Roxy Cafe - after 46 years.

This photograph was taken from the balcony of the Roxy Museum, which is on the first floor, above the Roxy Cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

North-facing front door, the TAFE Hospitality Training kitchen, Roxy 'complex' Bingara

The renovated TAFE which adjoins the rear of the Roxy Cafe, and the interior of the Roxy Theatre, has now been completed.

It will serve a really important function - particularly for residents and youth of Bingara and district.

This has been renovated and furnished to a very high standard.

Note how well integrated the the frontage is with the art deco style of the rest of the Roxy 'complex'.

It creates yet another 'jewel' in the Roxy 'complex' crown.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

The interior of the TAFE hospitality training college which adjoins the Roxy Cafe

This will serve a really important function - particularly for residents of Bingara and district, when it is opening shortly.

This has been renovated and furnished to a very high standard.

It creates yet another 'jewel' in the Roxy 'complex' crown.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

The Roxy 'complex" and the Roxy Cafe look beautiful at night time

The Roxy Cafe looks infinitely more beautiful at night when it is turned into a fully operational cafe.

The weekend of the 4th July, 2012, was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

The beautiful Roxy 'complex' attracts vintage car tourers on a regular basis

The opening weekend of the Roxy Cafe was no exception. 40 touring car drivers, families and guests, were treated with a dinner on the day - Saturday 4th July.

This was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

The new menu for the Roxy Cafe, on formica table top

During the very busy opening few days of the Roxy Cafe.

This photograph was taken on Saturday 4th July.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

Local barista Ben Hutton found time to serve Information Office staff member Jenny Mead

Saturday 4th July.

All staff at the Roxy cafe worked frantically during this very busy period.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

Vio and his staff worked frantically through this very busy period

Saturday 4th July.

Vio and Ayesha and five of their eight children - Amira, Zacharia, Ramona, Latifa and Hercules - have left Brisbane and their family Italian ristorante behind to make a new home in the town known as the ‘Gem of the New England’.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 11.07.2012

Zak and Ramona Nedianu. A new generation of "cafe kids"

Saturday 4th July.

Two of Vio and Ayesha Nedianu's children. Vio, a native of Timisoara in Romania, came to Bingara when he saw the search was on for someone to take over the Roxy, saw what had been done to the cafe, and fell in love with the concept all over again. Ayesha was originally from Jordan.

Vio and Ayesha and five of their eight children - Amira, Zacharia, Ramona, Latifa and Hercules - have left Brisbane and their family Italian ristorante behind to make a new home in the town known as the ‘Gem of the New England’.

It was a momentous occasion - the first time in 46 years that the cafe had been re-opened as a Greek-Australian style cafe.

Download pages from the North West Magzine pertaining to the opening of the Roxy Cafe, the Orange Festival, Bingara, the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School, and places of historical interest in the region:

North_West_Magazine_Composite_A.pdf

The "re-opening" of the Roxy coincided with the Orange Festival, Bingara, and the 150th anniversary of the Bingara Public School.


Central Web-links:

Gwydir Shire Roxy website

kythera-family central web-pages:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea