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History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 05.07.2016

The Five Californians

(Andy and his buddies on R & R in Naples. The Five Californians L to R Tom Georgalos, Salinas, CA. Perry Phillips, Oakland, CA-- Nick H. Cominos, Salinas, CA--James Kaporis*, Chicago, IL, Andy Mousalimas and Alex Phillips, Oakland, CA.
* 1942 James Kaporis was stationed at Fort Ord, near Salinas, where he met the five Californians before they were drafted in the Army. In Naples James was a general's chauffeur, Andy)

Martin Snapp, The Montclarion Newspaper, July 3, 2009

Go Tell the Spartans

One of the most historic places in Oakland is the King's X, the first sports bar in the Bay Area. It was the birthplace of not one but two cultural icons: fantasy football, which started at the King's X in the early 60s, and trivia contests, which started at the King's X in 1970.
That's where I came in. I had graduated from law school and was getting ready to take the Bar exam when I heard that the news director of KCBS was looking for a ringer for the station's trivia team because he was tired of losing to the guys from the King's X every year.
To put me on the team, he had to give me a job. And that was the end of my legal career.
But even more historically significant than the King's X was the man who owned it from 1968 to 1991, Andy Mousalimas.
He made every customer feel welcome. But you had to shout when talking to him because he was hard of hearing.
In 1991 Perry Phillips, the Oakland Tribune's entertainment columnist, died; and I decided to write an obit.
I had heard a rumor that during World War II, Perry belonged to a hush-hush Greek-American commando unit for the OSS (the forerunner of the CIA) who parachuted behind enemy lines into occupied Greece to sabotage the Nazis.
So I called the CIA to check it out. And the CIA guy I talked to said, "It's true. But if you want to know more, there's an OSS veteran in your neck of the woods named Andy Mousalimas who can give you all the details. He's a real hero."
I was floored. Andy had never mentioned a thing. But, then again, bragging was never his style.
I started hanging out with Andy and his fellow former commandos, and the stories they told - both of their wartime experiences and of the discrimination they suffered as Greek-Americans before the war - made the hair stand up on the back of my head.
Every one of them had a price on his head in Greece. Anyone who turned him in would receive his weight in gold - no small temptation for a population that was systematically being starved by the Germans.
"But not one single person ever turned us in," Andy said proudly. "Never."
His commando unit destroyed bridges, locomotives, trucks, power plants railroad track, pillboxes, armored cars, culverts, boxcars, telegraph poles and mine shafts. They killed thousands of enemy soldiers and pinned down tens of thousands more.
They got under Hitler's skin so much, he issued the infamous Fuhrer Order No. 003830: “From now on, all enemies on so-called commando missions are to be slaughtered to the last man." And many were.
Andy's hearing is almost completely gone now, the result of his eardrums being shattered by German bombs. But he's still going strong at 84.
This spring, the U.S. Army flew him and his wife, Mary, to Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, where his unit was honored by the Special Forces.
I called him last week and told him I was going to write this column. He said OK, but he had one condition:
"Make sure you don't glamorize it," he said. "There's nothing glamorous about war."
Happy July 4th, Andy. Efharisto. (That's Greek for "Thank you.")

Posted by Martin Snapp
http://martinsnapp.blogspot.com/

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 20.06.2009

Pete Clentzos - lighting the olympic torch in Los Angelos, CA 2004

Watch the YouTube Video: The Promise of Tomorrow

Pictured on the right with the white headband is Pete Clentzos.

Please help complete this documentary: "The Promise of Tomorrow." The Greek Heritage Society of Southern California (GHS), a nonprofit organization established in 1985, needs your help. "The Promise of Tomorrow" documents and highlights many stories of the first generation Greek Americans in their struggle and triumph to contribute to the American fabric, yet maintain their culture. GHS preserves the rich culture, heritage and traditions of Greek immigrants in Southern California and educates Greek American and non Greek American populations with our unique history. If we don't preserve these stories and pass them on, who will? Will you make a contribution? Thank you!

Visit their website and make your contribution! www.greekheritagesociety.org

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION OR QUESTIONS, PLEASE CONTACT:

greekheritage@hotmail.com

History > Photography

submitted by KCA Admin on 05.06.2009

Erifili Giannakopoulou in the role of Carmen

The first-ever grand opera production to be held on Kythera will take place in the evening of Saturday, 8 August, in the open-air amphitheatre of Zeidoros Cultural Centre in Kapsali. A street version of Georges Bizet’s famous opera Carmen produced by Opera Lab Athens will be staged by a talented group of young Greek professional singers.

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 31.05.2009

Irene Kacandes, author of Daddy's War: Greek American Stories

About the Book
When she was very young, Irene Kacandes knew things about her father that had no plot, no narrator, and no audience. To her childhood self these things resembled beings who resided with her family, like the ancestresses who’d thrown themselves off cliffs rather than be taken by the Turks, or the forefathers who’d fought the Trojans. For decades she thought of these cohabitants as Daddy’s War Experiences and tried to stay away from them. When tragedy touched the adult life she had constructed for herself, however, she realized she had to confront her family’s wartime past.

Kacandes begins with what she did know: that her immigrant grandmother returned to Greece with four young children—and without her husband—only to get trapped there by the Nazi occupation. Though still a child himself, her father, John, helped feed his younger siblings by taking up any task possible, including smuggling arms to the Resistance. Kacandes painstakingly uncovers a complex truth her father chose not to tell, a truth inextricably entwined with the Holocaust, discovering, too, a common but little-told story about how the telling of such memories is negotiated between survivors and their children. Daddy’s War brings new understanding to how trauma, like the revenge of Greek gods, can visit each generation and offers a model for breaking the cycle.

Authors/Editors
Irene Kacandes is a professor of German and comparative literature at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, and the author of several books, including Talk Fiction: Literature and the Talk Explosion (Nebraska 2001).

Praise
"I've read many stories of war—everything from medieval to Vietnam, and found this story to be unique—unique in the way that it was compiled, data analyzed, and written."—Leland K. Meitzler, www.genealogyblog.com


Awards
Publication of this volume was assisted by The Virginia Faulkner Fund, established in memory of Virginia Faulkner, editor in chief of the University of Nebraska Press.

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 31.05.2009

Daddy's War: Greek American Stories

When she was very young, Irene Kacandes knew things about her father that had no plot, no narrator, and no audience. To her childhood self these things resembled beings who resided with her family, like the ancestresses who’d thrown themselves off cliffs rather than be taken by the Turks, or the forefathers who’d fought the Trojans. For decades she thought of these cohabitants as Daddy’s War Experiences and tried to stay away from them. When tragedy touched the adult life she had constructed for herself, however, she realized she had to confront her family’s wartime past.

Kacandes begins with what she did know: that her immigrant grandmother returned to Greece with four young children—and without her husband—only to get trapped there by the Nazi occupation. Though still a child himself, her father, John, helped feed his younger siblings by taking up any task possible, including smuggling arms to the Resistance. Kacandes painstakingly uncovers a complex truth her father chose not to tell, a truth inextricably entwined with the Holocaust, discovering, too, a common but little-told story about how the telling of such memories is negotiated between survivors and their children. Daddy’s War brings new understanding to how trauma, like the revenge of Greek gods, can visit each generation and offers a model for breaking the cycle.


Irene Kacandes is a professor of German and comparative literature at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, and the author of several books, including Talk Fiction: Literature and the Talk Explosion (Nebraska 2001).


"I've read many stories of war—everything from medieval to Vietnam, and found this story to be unique—unique in the way that it was compiled, data analyzed, and written."—Leland K. Meitzler, www.genealogyblog.com

Publication of this volume was assisted by The Virginia Faulkner Fund, established in memory of Virginia Faulkner, editor in chief of the University of Nebraska Press.

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 25.05.2009

Kythera Bookshelves Project 2009

In September 2008, Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, a member of the Kytherian Society of California, visited Kythera for the first time. After meeting Australian Kytherian, George Poulos on his visit to Southern California in the summer of 2007, Cynthia had the opportunity to re-connect with him on this visit. George graciously introduced Cynthia to Kythera’s Mayor, Theodore Koukoulis. During their conversation, the mayor mentioned that there is a need on the island for bookshelves to help furnish the island’s first “public lending” library.

Cynthia works for the city of Alhambra in California, which has just recently opened a new library and concurrently has vacated its former library site. In doing so, only the books were moved to the new library, leaving all of the furniture and the bookshelves behind at the former site. With this in mind Cynthia approached the city of Alhambra administration and arranged to recycle the no longer needed shelves for Kythera. Concurrently, Cynthia also contacted Mayor Koukoulis’ office at the municipality on Kythera to be certain that they could use and would like to have the bookshelves for the island. Cynthia was contacted by John Stathatos, director of the Kytherian Cultural Association and KIPA - The Kytherian Foundation for Culture & Development (Mayor Koukoulis’s designee for the project) who responded with an enthusiastic “yes!”

Click here to see letters from Kythera

Cynthia is also a member of the Soroptimist International of Alhambra, San Gabriel, San Marino. This philanthropic organization has been instrumental in supporting and facilitating the project since its inception and began accepting donations for the project in October 2008. Upon hearing of the effort, the Kytherian Society of California and the Kytherian Association of Australia joined the effort and also established special tax deductible accounts to accept donations for the Kythera Bookshelves Project.

The budget is finalized and donations are being secured to make this project come to fruition. Hopefully you will recognize how invaluable this project is to the island and how much it will improve island life. Please open your hearts and your treasury to assist with funding the transport of the shelves. Cost for truck transport from Alhambra to the Port of Long Beach, shipping to Athens, Customs and Port charges in Athens and final transport from Athens to Kythera are anticipated to be approximately $10,750. Although this may seem high at first glance, it is important to note that the cost of purchasing commercial bookshelves of this quality on the open market would exceed these special discounted “charity goods” shipping charges alone. Additionally, shipping charges and duty charges for new shelves would be exorbitantly high, making the bookshelves unobtainable.

To date sizable donations have been secured from organizations including the Kytherian Society of California, the Kytherian Association of New York, AHEPA Chapter #349, Staten Island, New York, Rotary Club of Alhambra, CA, the Jarvis Family, the city of Alhambra, individual members of the Soroptimist International of Alhambra, San Gabriel, and San Marino, CA, and numerous private individuals but we still have a long way to go.

As a potential donor, we urge you to give this project serious consideration.
No donation is too large or too small,
All donations are 100% tax deductible & gratefully accepted.

Donations may be made payable to:

Kytherian Society of California
1478 Calais
Livermore, CA 94550
USA

For those in Australia checks may be made payable to:

Kytherian World Heritage Fund
and mailed to:

Treasurer
Kytherian Association of Australia
P.O. Box A203
Sydney South, NSW 1235
Australia

For additional information, please contact:
Cynthia Cavalenes- Jarvis, Bookshelves Project Manager
via email Cynthia Cavalenes or by cell phone at 626-625-8301

She will be very happy to answer any questions you may have and is eager to hear any suggestions or comments as well.

Visit the Kytherian Society of California Website where you can donate via Paypal
Kytherian Society of California – Kythera Bookshelves Project

History > Photography

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 21.05.2009

House to Rent

House for rent for a min. period of 3 weeks in the months of June, July, August and September. The house is in the village of Trifyllianika only 5 minutes from P otamos (commerical village of the island) and 10 minutes from Agia Pelagia (beaches and restaurants). The house has 2 bedrooms and can house up to 5 people, has nice little kitchen, large shower, tv, and the grey house next door has a washing machine. The house is in a quiet, peaceful part of kythera. A dvd is avaiable of the house. For information contact Stephen Trifyllis, Brisbane, Australia: 0061 412 729927 or 0061 7 33978454. In Australia phone 0412 729927, or 33978454.

History > Photography

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 21.05.2009

House to Rent this summer

House for rent for a min. period of 3 weeks in the months of June, July, August and September. The house is in the village of Trifyllianika only 5 minutes from P otamos (commerical village of the island) and 10 minutes from Agia Pelagia (beaches and restaurants). The house has 2 bebrooms and can house up to 5 people, has nice little kitchen, large shower, tv, and the grey house next door has a washing machine. The house is in a quiet, peaceful part of kythera. A dvd is avaiable of the house. For information contact Stephen Trifyllis, Brisbane, Australia: 0061 412 729927 or 0061 7 33978454. In Australia phone 0412 729927, or 33978454.

History > Photography

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 13.05.2009

house for rent summer 2009

house for rent for a min. period of 3 weeks in the months of june , july ,august and september,the house is in the village of trifyllianika only 5 minutes from potamos[commerical village of the island] and 10 minutes from agia pelagia[beaches and restaurants]the house has 2 bebrooms and can house up to 5 people, has nice little kitchen , large shower, tv, and the grey house next door has a washing machine, the house is in a quiet, peaceful part of kythera.a dvd is avaiable of the house. for information contact stephen trifyllis brisbane ,australia 0061 412 729927 or 0061 7 33978454. in australia phone 0412 729927, or 33978454.

History > Photography

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 13.05.2009

ggggg

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History > Photography

submitted by Anna Cominos on 20.03.2009

The troubled waters tug waits on stand-by

please add a caption here

History > Photography

submitted by Anna Cominos on 20.03.2009

The troubled waters tug

please add a caption here

History > Photography

submitted by Rose Rasmussen-Tzortzopoulou on 14.04.2009

The construction of the Platia Ammos road

Eleftherios Tzortzopoulos is 2nd from the left with the view of Platia Ammo behind him.

In 1958,Eleftherios Nikolaou Tzortzopoulos,our grandfather,was the local mayor who was responsible for the top Platia Ammos road.The first 300 metres or so were literally done by hand and the rest was completed with the first ever bulldozer brought to the island,specifically for this reason.The construction was by no means an easy task as Leftheris faced a lot of opposition from many locals who expressed the opinion that he was only making a road to lead to his house.In reality though Eleftherios Tzortzopoulos had a greater vision and that was the progress of the Island and of the port-village of Platia Ammos.

History > Photography

submitted by Albert Blok on 11.02.2009

The bedroom

The bedroom

History > Photography

submitted by Albert Blok on 11.02.2009

Window of the bedroom

Window of the bedroom

History > Photography

submitted by Albert Blok on 11.02.2009

Livingroom seen from the kitchen

Livingroom seen from the kitchen

History > Photography

submitted by Albert Blok on 11.02.2009

View to Frilingianika and the houses

View to Frilingianika and the houses

History > Photography

submitted by Albert Blok on 11.02.2009

View to the kitchen from the livingroom

View to the kitchen from the livingroom

History > Photography

submitted by Albert Blok on 11.02.2009

View to the bedroom

View to the bedroom

History > Photography

submitted by ΕΛΕΝΗ ΣΟΥΡΗ on 16.01.2009