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History > Photography

submitted by Kyrranne Thomas on 25.03.2010

Effie Zaunders - 8/5/1916 - 27/1/2010

By, daughters, Rene & Aphrodite

Our mother, Effie Zantiotis, was born on 8/5/1916 in Pireaus to Aphroditie and Panagioti Coroneos, (Faganas) - who originally came from Karavas, in Kythera. Mum was the 5th born in a family of 8 children – 4 boys and 4 girls.

At the age of 19 she was betrothed by proxy to our father, George Zantiotis (Zaunders) last son of Emmanuel and Eirene Zantiotis (Yerandis )from Vouno, Kythera.

Effie arrived in Sydney on the maiden voyage of the P & O Liner ‘Orion’ which during the war became a troop transport ship (the ‘Orion’ was returned to normal service after the war). In 1954 our parents had their first trip to Greece and traveled back to Australia on the ‘Orion’.

Our parents were married on 29/12/1935 (as it was considered bad luck to be married in a Leap Year which would have been 1936 – the following year). Mum and Dad then moved to the ‘Elite Café’ in Taree to be in partnership with Dad’s elder brother, Jack. The ‘Elite Café’ is well known in the district.

They were blessed with a daughter, Rene, born in Taree, and after 4 years they moved to Forster and opened ‘The California Café’ in December 1940. A second daughter, Aphroditie, was born a few months later.

These were very tough years for our mother as she had to adjust to a strange land, no English, very far from her family and any other Greek families. Our mother successfully raised her 2 daughters in the Greek tradition.

In September, 1949, a big move to the city was decided and our parents opened a Milk Bar/Restaurant named ‘The Aristocrat’ in Lane Cove where they stayed till 1958. An opportunity for a Sandwich Shop arose in Camperdown – this they found much easier to manage after the Milk Bar/Restaurant. (By then, both daughters were married.)

Retiring in 1972 our parents travelled annually and extensively to America, Europe and Greece. Effie had the good fortune to enjoy seeing her parents and siblings on many of these trips.

During this time our Mother became a founding member of the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary. Now her 2 daughters and grand daughter are following in her footsteps.

Mum did a lot of charity work and handicrafts for her Church (which kept her busy) in the form of crocheted squares (for blankets) and coathangers.

Our mother took enormous pride that her grandchildren spoke Greek, and delighted in the fact that all her grandchildren and great grandchildren had visited her beloved Greece.

Effie was widowed in 1981 but still continued her annual pilgrimage to Greece (as our father was buried with his parents in Panagia Despina Church, Vouno, Kythera). It was also a great pleasure for her to return to the land of her birth to enjoy the companionship of her parents (until they passed on) and her brothers & sisters and their families. When mum came back from these trips we all commented that she always looked ten years younger.

She idolized her 6 grandchildren, who in turn adored her and was called Megali Yiayia by her 3 great grandchildren.

Our mother was a very elegant and well groomed lady who had very high values and we shall miss her greatly as she was our guiding light and inspiration.

Mum and Dad’s name are engraved on the ‘Welcome Wall’ in Darling Harbour and have become that part of the Kytherian Diaspora who ventured to a new land.


If you have a mother,
Cherish her with care
Because now we know the difference
As we see her empty chair.


EFFIE ZAUNDERS
8/5/1916 - 27/1/2010


We wish to thank you for your kind and comforting
Expressions of sympathy conveyed to us in our bereavement.
Your thoughtfulness is deeply appreciated
And will always be remembered.


BOTANY CEMETERY
Lawn Section 42
Portion Number:154


Rene & Aphrodite

History > Photography

submitted by Anna Avgoustou on 16.03.2010

Kerry, John and Violet Cordato at their Campsie Milk Bar

From left - John Cordato, Betty (a worker), Violet Dimitratos and Kerry Cordato at their Milk Bar next to Odeon Theatre, Campsie between 1949 and 1954

History > Photography

submitted by Anna Avgoustou on 16.03.2010

Violet Dimitratos with 6 grandchildren

Violet Dimitratos with her 6 grandchildren :
Back row from left - Stephanie Avgoustou, Violet Dimitratos, Stephanie Mihailidis, Nicholas Calligeros
Front row from left - Anastasia Mihailidis, Chloe Avgoustou, Harrison Calligeros

History > Photography

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 05.03.2010

HOUSE FOR RENT SUMMER 2010

perfect little house avaiable for rent from july 2010, the house is to be rented for minimium period of 3 weeks. the house is in the very traditional and peaceful village of trifyllianika.only 5 minutes from the main village of the island potamos, where you can do your banking, internet , shopping for groceries and having lunch or dinner, or just sitting down for a coffee and a chat around the best platia[town square]on the island . the house has two bedrooms,one acts also as a large lounge room, has a nice kitchen, television,large shower , refrigerator, all linen, towels,the house next door has a brand new washing machine, this house was renovated in 2003, and is the perfect beach hut, with several beaches only 10 minutes away...a dvd on the house is avaiable, contact stephen trifyllis, outside australia 0061412729927 or 0061733978454 or with in australia 0412729927 or [07] 33978454

History > Photography

submitted by Paul Vlandys on 14.01.2010

Vlandis Nickolas Paul

 

History > Photography

submitted by Paul Vlandys on 14.01.2010

Vlandis Maria

 

History > Photography

submitted by Paul Vlandys on 14.01.2010

Vlandis Paul

 

History > Photography

submitted by KCA Admin on 10.01.2010

"Life in Australia"

please add a caption here

History > Photography

submitted by Peter (Panagiotis) Prineas on 01.01.2010

Front cover: 'Britain's Greek Islands'

'Britain's Greek Islands' by Peter Prineas'
ISBN 9780980672213
AUD $38.50 plus postage and packing
Plateia 32 Calder Road Darlington NSW Australia 2008
plateia@ozemail.com.au ph 61 2 93191513

History > Photography

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 14.12.2009

The great Grecian earn: how immigrants made a cafe society

Sydney Morning Herald, December 9, 2009 page 10.

A newly reprinted book reveals the story of early Greek migrants in Australia, writes Anna Patty.

The dockets at Aroney's Cafe in Katoomba trumpeted its ''famous'' fish dinners and ''famous toasted sandwiches''. But it was the hot chocolates, created by my father, that won the cafe its true acclaim.
Customers travelled from as far as Canberra and Sydney, and even overseas, for a hot chocolate at Aroney's, which was named after its original owner, Peter Aroney. The cafe stayed open until late. The customers decided when it was time to leave.
My father treated every customer - whether they were men down on their luck from the nearby Eldon hostel or the prime minister, Ben Chifley, on his way home to Bathurst - with the same deference.
Aroney's stood at the top of the main street of Katoomba, across the road from the Paragon Cafe and Carrington Hotel, and near Theo Poulos Real Estate, which were also run … by Greeks. The Cordatos, Archondoulis, Zakis, Lekkas, Darias, Bistaros, Stavros, Prineas, Georges, Vrachnos and Fotias families have also run businesses in Katoomba in the past 40 years years.
A book distributed to Greek migrants in 1916, Life in Australia, has just been reprinted and translated into English by the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. The book, being launched at the University of Sydney today, reveals the struggles and successes of Australia's early Greek migrants.
''Greek establishments stand in the most important and most central locations in almost all of the cities in Australia,'' the book says.
''The lengthy nomenclature of their owners mean that such establishments are easily recognisable. Some Greeks, however, have shortened their names, as the Australians find it hard to pronounce such long, difficult names.''
My father, Ioannis Varipatis, left the small Greek island of Kythera, at the southern tip of the Peloponnese, in the mid 1920s, before he was even a teenager. Speaking no English, he accepted the advice of migration officials and swapped the name Ioannis Varipatis for Jack Patty.
My father and his older brother, George, bought Aroney's in 1937. Katoomba was home to a host of Greek cafes, including The Paragon, The AB Cafe and The Savoy, which was owned by another of Dad's brothers, Andy. The cafe became a family affair when Dad invited his brothers-in-law, George and Peter Cassimatis, to join his business.
Like many other Greek migrants, my father and Zacharias Simos, who established the famed Paragon cafe, were assimilated into Australian life - though they maintained a deep pride in their heritage and strong ties with Greek cultural tradition.
In 1934 Zacharias and his wife Mary (Panaretos) gave birth to their son Theodore, who became a top barrister, representing the British Government in the Spycatcher case against one Malcolm Turnbull, and later a Supreme Court Judge. He died aged 75 this year.
Life in Australia presents photos and commentary about other early Greek businesses such as those owned by the Andronicus Brothers and Nicholas Aroney.
My father retired in the late 1980s when he was aged 75. Only then did he make his first trip home to Kythera - after 66 years - and met, for the first time, the youngest of his 11 siblings, his sister Anna.
And yet, it was only during that first and only return visit to Greece that my parents realised how ''Australian'' they were. My mother, who Australianised her name from Caliopy Cassimatis to Poppy Patty, was especially offended at how rarely she heard the words ''please'' and ''thank you'' spoken in Greece.
Life in Australia had already traversed this territory. The Greek migrant is advised: ''If we carefully consider the measured and ordered life of the Australians, we find that Australians, wherever they are, eat, dress, sleep and walk with the greatest of care and circumspection. They begin every conversation with ''please'' and finish it with 'thank you.'''
It further informs: ''Raising your voice, banging your hand on the table, making gestures, forming groups in the streets, impertinence, scruffy dress are, for the Australians, something strange and unattractive. Such habits are disliked and, anyway, belong to uncivilised peoples.''
According to the latest census figures there are now more than 365,000 people of Greek heritage living in Australia. Angelo Notaras, the trustee and administrator of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, which also runs kythera-family.net, said that he was about 10 years old (in about 1943) when his father showed him a family copy of Life in Australia. It contains a photo of his father, grandfather and uncle John, standing in front of the Marble Bar Cafe in Grafton, in about 1912.
Life in Australia was written, in Greek, in 1916 by Georgios Kentavros and two merchant brothers, Kosmas and Emmanouil Andronikos.
It was was financed by another merchant, John Comino.
''Little did we realise that it was the most important Greek publication in the first 200 years of Australian history,'' Notaras said.
George Poulos, the second administrator and trustee of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, said he hoped families would be inspired to expand and chronicle the Greek Australian narrative from 1916 to the present day.

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 15.11.2009

John Scolinos - Cal Poly professor, coach, dies at age 91

please add a caption here

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 15.11.2009

John Scolinos - Cal Poly professor, coach, dies at age 91

Reprinted from the San Gabriel Tribune
San Gabriel Valley, CA, USA

By Jim McConnell, Staff Writer
Posted: 11/07/2009 09:17:30 PM PST

CLAREMONT - John Scolinos, a professor emeritus at Cal Poly Pomona who coached baseball at the university for 30 years and for whom the baseball field is named, died early Saturday. He was 91.

Scolinos, a resident of Claremont for 45 years, coached baseball at Cal Poly from 1961 until his retirement in 1991. Prior to that, he coached football and baseball at Pepperdine University in Los Angeles. When he retired, after 44 years of coaching, he was the winningest baseball coach in NCAA history, with 1,198 victories.

It's impossible to measure the number of lives he affected in a positive way, according to those who knew him.

"He was at the top of his class," said Fred Claire, a former Dodgers executive. "He was a coach, but his message went far beyond baseball. You couldn't be around John without feeling better about yourself."

Scolinos' Cal Poly teams were known as the classic overachievers. The program operated without scholarships at a small university, but Scolinos still managed to win 822 games in 30 seasons, and three NCAA Division II national titles.

"Coach Scolinos was truly one of the most inspirational educators and coaches in the history of Cal Poly Pomona," university President J. Michael Ortiz said in a written statement. "Our heartfelt thoughts and prayers go out to his wife, Helen, their daughter, Violet, and the entire Scolinos family."

Ben Hines, a former baseball coach at the University of La Verne, called Scolinos the Godfather of baseball in the East Valley.
"It's the passing of an era," said Hines. "He really was the guy who put East Valley baseball on the map. And a nicer, kinder person you will never meet."

Hines said learning from Scolinos meant learning the "game the right way."

"He was a highly principled individual," he said. "He was always telling me `I don't want any donkeys in my program.' But, the thing was, if you behaved yourself he would never, ever cut you off the roster."

Scolinos, a graduate of Manual Arts High School in Los Angeles, played five years of minor league baseball from 1937 to 1941.

He never got close to making the majors.

"I thought I was going to be star," Scolinos said in a 1994 interview. "It was a very humbling experience. I think I learned then to stay modest, and be realistic about your goals. Know your limitations, as they say. And get an education."

Scolinos served in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II as a navigator/radio operator, and flew nearly 20 bombing missions over Japan. He returned to Los Angeles in 1946 and enrolled at Pepperdine.

He earned his bachelor's degree from Pepperdine in 1949 and his master's degree from USC in 1953.

Scolinos' coaching career began in 1946 when Pepperdine officials found themselves without a baseball coach on the eve of the season and managed to convince Scolinos to take over the team.

"I was probably the worst coach you ever saw there at first," Scolinos said. "But once I learned I needed to treat my players as human beings, that good old Golden Rule, it started to turn around.

"From then on, I loved every minute of coaching and teaching. It's great if you can make a guy into a better ballplayer, but the most important thing is to make him into a better person."

Art Mazmanian, a former Mt. San Antonio College coach, said Scolinos was an amazing teacher.

"If you couldn't learn something about baseball and life from John, you were just not trying," Mazmanian said.

Mazmanian met Scolinos at USC. He recalled rooming with Scolinos while the two were coaches on the 1984 U.S. Olympic team.

"I know one of the greatest experiences of my life... I realized then that baseball was just one part of his life. He really was all about people. I cannot imagine anyone not liking John," he said.

Scolinos came to Cal Poly Pomona in 1961. He served one year as assistant coach under Barney Anoosian before taking over the program in 1962.

During his 30 years at the university, his teams won six conference titles. Over 100 of his players eventually went on to play pro baseball.

Scolinos was inducted into the American Association of Collegiate Baseball Coaches' Hall of Fame in 1974. He was selected as Cal Poly Pomona Professor of the Year in 1976. The baseball field was named in his honor in 1987.

"Coach Scolinos left a legacy that probably will never be matched," said current Cal Poly baseball coach Mike Ashman. "I was proud to have known him and to have played for him.

"The lessons he taught have had an impact on all his players' lives. Not only did he have the respect and love of his players, but the impact he had on other coaches across the country and to the students here on campus was equally great."

Scolinos is survived by his wife of 59 years, Helen, and daughter, Violet. Funeral services are pending.

jim.mcconnell@sgvn.com

(626) 962-8811, Ext. 2306

History > Photography

submitted by Eleutheria Jensen on 01.11.2009

Nickolaos E. Tzortzopoulos

Captain Nick the Greek

History > Photography

submitted by Eleutheria Jensen on 01.11.2009

Nickolaos E. Tzortzopoulos

Captain Nick

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 01.11.2009

MacLaurin Hall, Main Quadrangle, Sydney University

Large event in progress, MacLaurin Hall, October, 2009.

Venue for the launch of the recently published books, Life in Australia (1916) in GREEK, and Life in Australia (1916) in ENGLISH.

This is yet, another Kytherian World Heritage (mega) Event, conducted under the auspices of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund.

To download a superb 4-page brochure about the event, which also provides information as to how to purchase these books, go to:

/download/LIA_Launch_flyer_1.pdf

If you download this brochure, between now an the launch date on 9 Decemember, 2009, could you please Forward, the brochure to ALL Hellenes and Philohellenes on your email list, who you know might be interested in attending the event.

*Note that in the book(s) Life in Australia, (1916, 2009), a photograph on page 62, designating Sydney University, depicts the Main Quadrangle, in which the MacLaurin Hall is housed.

MacLaurin Hall (former Fisher Library) University of Sydney

Architect......Walter Liberty Vernon

Location.......Darlington

Date...........1902-9

Style..........Federation Gothic

Construction...stucco, stone trim

Type...........Education

Inspired by English Perpendicular Gothic Collegiate buildings. With the towers popular then. The Gothic Revival style Medical school visually complements the main quadrangle of Sydney University and is of considerable architectural significance in its own right. Two courtyards were formed, at different levels due to the slope of the site, separated by a link building in the form of a cloister (now modified). The original wing contained a museum and laboratories on the ground floor and five theatres and a dissecting room on the first floor. Additional theatres were constructed within the new wings.

MacLaurin Hall is located at the south-west corner of the Quadrangle Building, diagonally opposite The Great Hall. The exterior continues the neo-Gothic style of the earlier buildings.
The upper floor was built to house the Fisher Library, with the reading room in the main chamber. Five floors of book stacks were originally siuated in the building's northern arm, where the grand entrance stair is now located. The ground floor was built for the Nicholson Museum, which is still there (see Nicolson Museum).
The Fisher Library moved to its current location on Eastern Avenue in 1962, and MacLaurin Hall was substantially renovated in the late 1980's to provide a spectacular venue for recitals, formal dinners and corporate gatherings.

Construction of support services was completed in December 2004 which added a banquet kitchen and a goods passenger lift adjacent the rear stairwell.

The first purpose-built library for the University designed not only for its principal function but to advance the public understanding of art history and the appreciation of fine craftsmanship. Designed in the European Gothic tradition but constructed in the best Australian materials and with the highest quality craftsmanship, the library proudly extolled Australian craftsmen as the equal of their forbears. The choice of cedar for the hammer-beam roof represented an awareness of the diminishing availability of one of the finest and most distinctive materials of early settlement and was intended as 'an enduring example in, and memento of, the fast-disappearing cedar of the east coast of Australia'. The carvings and decorative embellishments of the building proclaimed in symbolic form the University's place within the tradition of British universities and the contemporary international world of scholarship. A very fine example of the Gothic Revival Buildings designed by Walter Liberty Vernon. An integral part of probably the finest collection of Gothic Revival buildings in Australia.

Historical Notes:

The University library was begun in 1852 and by the 1880s was housed in various locations in the main building. Thomas Fisher's bequest in 1884 provided sufficient funds for book purchases and for a building fund and in October 1889 the government agreed to provide matching funding but in the 1890s Depression no money was forthcoming. In 1900 the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works recommended that the government fully fund the building leaving the Fisher Fund as a perpetual endowment for library purposes. Designed by the Government Architect's branch 'with a view to the advancement of art education of the people' as well as for its main purpose, work began on 23 January 1902 and Fisher Library was opened on 20 September 1909. Occupying part of the south side of the, as yet unrealised, quadrangle the building accommodated the Nicholson collection on the ground floor, a large reading room for 150 readers on the first floor and a refectory and service rooms in the basement with six floors of book stacks at right angles forming part of the west side of the quadrangle. Of high quality workmanship including stone carving executed 'by one of the best Gothic carvers in Australasia' and a magnificent cedar hammer beam roof the design and embellishments of the library claimed the University's place within the tradition of British universities and the international community of scholars. The initials of the Government Architect W L Vernon and his assistants William Mitchell, George McRae and Arthur S Cook were included in the carvings. The library and book stacks were vacated with the opening of the new Fisher Library in 1962 and altered for other uses by Fowell Mansfield & Maclurcan. The reading room was remodelled and named the MacLaurin Hall after Chancellor Sir Norman MacLaurin. Seven levels of open steel structure, stairs and lifts within the book stack were demolished and replaced by teaching and office spaces and a staircase leading to a new entrance.

Physical Description:

Maclaurin Hall, the former Fisher Library is Gothic Revival in style. The building was designed to form a corner to the Quadrangle and is two storey to the Quadrangle and three storey to Manning Road. The southern facade features a central bay flanked by two turrets. Blind tracery follows the line of the gable which terminates in a carved finial, a motif continued from the earlier ranges to the east. The stepped buttresses to the southern elevation emphasise the form of the building similar to the chapels of the medieval colleges. The reading room was located on the upper floor and these windows received the most elaborate tracery. The hammerbeam roof of the reading room/hall is constructed of cedar and is based on English prototypes with which the Government Architect Walter Liberty Vernon was familiar. The roof of the hall is clad with copper/muntz metal. A distinctive feature of the building is its elaborate skyline, formed by the pinnacles which terminate the buttresses, the carved finials to the gables and the central fleche. The louvred fleche, which is constructed of timber, is clad with lead. This motif was used on all of the faculty buildings designed by Vernon and may be based on the elaborate fleche added to Cardiff Castle during the extensive renovations by Burges. Intended to vent gas lit buildings the elements were developed into distinctive roofscape elements.

Physical Condition:

Refer to the 1999 University of Sydney Heritage Fabric Survey. Interior not assessed.

Modification Dates:

1962 - Removal of book stack fitout 1966 - Renovation of the Nicholson Museum 1988 - Restoration of MacLaurin Hall

Recommended Management:

Refer to the 1999 University of Sydney Heritage Fabric Survey. Ensure that the impact on any proposal on the heritage significance of the building, and their setting, is assessed when planning new works. The preparation of a detailed Conservation Management Plan for this building, and its curtilage is recommended. Further research to determine the cultural significance of this item is required.

Further Information:

Further assessment of the significance of the Main Quadrangle and its place in the development of the Gothic Revival style both in Australia and internationally should be undertaken. The two halls of the Main Quad are of at least national significance and should be placed in an international context.

http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/UNI/UNI-026.htm

With thanks to http://www.usyd.edu.au/

www.sydneyarchitecture.com

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 01.11.2009

MacLaurin Hall, Main Quadrangle, Sydney University

A view from the South.

Venue for the launch of the recently published books, Life in Australia (1916) in GREEK, and Life in Australia (1916) in ENGLISH.

This is yet, another Kytherian World Heritage (mega) Event, conducted under the auspices of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund.

To download a superb 4-page brochure about the event, which also provides information as to how to purchase these books, go to:

/download/LIA_Launch_flyer_1.pdf

If you download this brochure, between now an the launch date on 9 Decemember, 2009, could you please Forward, the brochure to ALL Hellenes and Philohellenes on your email list, who you know might be interested in attending the event.

*Note that in the book(s) Life in Australia, (1916, 2009), a photograph on page 62, designating Sydney University, depicts the Main Quadrangle, in which the MacLaurin Hall is housed.

MacLaurin Hall (former Fisher Library) University of Sydney

Architect......Walter Liberty Vernon

Location.......Darlington

Date...........1902-9

Style..........Federation Gothic

Construction...stucco, stone trim

Type...........Education

Inspired by English Perpendicular Gothic Collegiate buildings. With the towers popular then. The Gothic Revival style Medical school visually complements the main quadrangle of Sydney University and is of considerable architectural significance in its own right. Two courtyards were formed, at different levels due to the slope of the site, separated by a link building in the form of a cloister (now modified). The original wing contained a museum and laboratories on the ground floor and five theatres and a dissecting room on the first floor. Additional theatres were constructed within the new wings.

MacLaurin Hall is located at the south-west corner of the Quadrangle Building, diagonally opposite The Great Hall. The exterior continues the neo-Gothic style of the earlier buildings.
The upper floor was built to house the Fisher Library, with the reading room in the main chamber. Five floors of book stacks were originally siuated in the building's northern arm, where the grand entrance stair is now located. The ground floor was built for the Nicholson Museum, which is still there (see Nicolson Museum).
The Fisher Library moved to its current location on Eastern Avenue in 1962, and MacLaurin Hall was substantially renovated in the late 1980's to provide a spectacular venue for recitals, formal dinners and corporate gatherings.

Construction of support services was completed in December 2004 which added a banquet kitchen and a goods passenger lift adjacent the rear stairwell.

The first purpose-built library for the University designed not only for its principal function but to advance the public understanding of art history and the appreciation of fine craftsmanship. Designed in the European Gothic tradition but constructed in the best Australian materials and with the highest quality craftsmanship, the library proudly extolled Australian craftsmen as the equal of their forbears. The choice of cedar for the hammer-beam roof represented an awareness of the diminishing availability of one of the finest and most distinctive materials of early settlement and was intended as 'an enduring example in, and memento of, the fast-disappearing cedar of the east coast of Australia'. The carvings and decorative embellishments of the building proclaimed in symbolic form the University's place within the tradition of British universities and the contemporary international world of scholarship. A very fine example of the Gothic Revival Buildings designed by Walter Liberty Vernon. An integral part of probably the finest collection of Gothic Revival buildings in Australia.

Historical Notes:

The University library was begun in 1852 and by the 1880s was housed in various locations in the main building. Thomas Fisher's bequest in 1884 provided sufficient funds for book purchases and for a building fund and in October 1889 the government agreed to provide matching funding but in the 1890s Depression no money was forthcoming. In 1900 the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works recommended that the government fully fund the building leaving the Fisher Fund as a perpetual endowment for library purposes. Designed by the Government Architect's branch 'with a view to the advancement of art education of the people' as well as for its main purpose, work began on 23 January 1902 and Fisher Library was opened on 20 September 1909. Occupying part of the south side of the, as yet unrealised, quadrangle the building accommodated the Nicholson collection on the ground floor, a large reading room for 150 readers on the first floor and a refectory and service rooms in the basement with six floors of book stacks at right angles forming part of the west side of the quadrangle. Of high quality workmanship including stone carving executed 'by one of the best Gothic carvers in Australasia' and a magnificent cedar hammer beam roof the design and embellishments of the library claimed the University's place within the tradition of British universities and the international community of scholars. The initials of the Government Architect W L Vernon and his assistants William Mitchell, George McRae and Arthur S Cook were included in the carvings. The library and book stacks were vacated with the opening of the new Fisher Library in 1962 and altered for other uses by Fowell Mansfield & Maclurcan. The reading room was remodelled and named the MacLaurin Hall after Chancellor Sir Norman MacLaurin. Seven levels of open steel structure, stairs and lifts within the book stack were demolished and replaced by teaching and office spaces and a staircase leading to a new entrance.

Physical Description:

Maclaurin Hall, the former Fisher Library is Gothic Revival in style. The building was designed to form a corner to the Quadrangle and is two storey to the Quadrangle and three storey to Manning Road. The southern facade features a central bay flanked by two turrets. Blind tracery follows the line of the gable which terminates in a carved finial, a motif continued from the earlier ranges to the east. The stepped buttresses to the southern elevation emphasise the form of the building similar to the chapels of the medieval colleges. The reading room was located on the upper floor and these windows received the most elaborate tracery. The hammerbeam roof of the reading room/hall is constructed of cedar and is based on English prototypes with which the Government Architect Walter Liberty Vernon was familiar. The roof of the hall is clad with copper/muntz metal. A distinctive feature of the building is its elaborate skyline, formed by the pinnacles which terminate the buttresses, the carved finials to the gables and the central fleche. The louvred fleche, which is constructed of timber, is clad with lead. This motif was used on all of the faculty buildings designed by Vernon and may be based on the elaborate fleche added to Cardiff Castle during the extensive renovations by Burges. Intended to vent gas lit buildings the elements were developed into distinctive roofscape elements.

Physical Condition:

Refer to the 1999 University of Sydney Heritage Fabric Survey. Interior not assessed.

Modification Dates:

1962 - Removal of book stack fitout 1966 - Renovation of the Nicholson Museum 1988 - Restoration of MacLaurin Hall

Recommended Management:

Refer to the 1999 University of Sydney Heritage Fabric Survey. Ensure that the impact on any proposal on the heritage significance of the building, and their setting, is assessed when planning new works. The preparation of a detailed Conservation Management Plan for this building, and its curtilage is recommended. Further research to determine the cultural significance of this item is required.

Further Information:

Further assessment of the significance of the Main Quadrangle and its place in the development of the Gothic Revival style both in Australia and internationally should be undertaken. The two halls of the Main Quad are of at least national significance and should be placed in an international context.

http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/UNI/UNI-026.htm

With thanks to http://www.usyd.edu.au/

www.sydneyarchitecture.com

History > Photography

submitted by Alexander Riedmüller on 30.09.2009

Alexander Riedmüller M.A.

Alexander Riedmüller M.A.

History > Photography

submitted by Visitkythera.gr Tourist Information on 16.08.2009

Reply - Reply - Ferry schedule to Kythera

James,
Thank you for your assistance. I sent a request for information to porfyra and have heard nothing from them. My recollection is that I tried to email them last year and never heard back from them.
I do have a number for a port agent in Neapoli named Dimitrios Livanos, 27340. Are you familiar with this?

thanks again

Nick Sofios

History > Photography

submitted by Terry Nicolson on 30.07.2009

Nicolson Terry

 

History > Photography

submitted by Nataly Werthaim on 23.07.2009

Kaleris Restaurant , Agia Pelagia.

Welcome to Kaleris Restaurant. We are inviting you to experience unique Mediteranean on the beautiful beach at Ayia Pelagia.

In our menu you will find both traditional
Greek dishes, as well as new variations of Greek cuisine infused with other Mediteranean flavours.

Kaleris teams maintains a 30 years tradion, but is in tune with modern culinary developments.

The most outstanding menu on the island.

Telephone: +30 27360 33461