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History > Photography

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History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 14.07.2010

House for Sale in Karavas2

House for Sale in Karavas2

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 14.07.2010

House for Sale in Karavas1

House for Sale in Karavas1

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 13.07.2010

Kytherian Association of New York Banner

Kytherian Association of New York Banner
Organized in 1919

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 13.07.2010

Kythira Association of New York, logo

Kytherian Association of New York, logo

History > Photography

submitted by James Gavriles on 23.06.2010

Dr. Joseph Stratigos

please add a caption here

History > Photography

submitted by John Fardoulis on 26.05.2010

Digging for the past

Volunteering on an archaeological dig is a unique way of helping search for new chapters of Kythera's ancient past. Literally from the ground (dirt) up.

Photo credit: Fivos Tsaravopoulos

History > Photography

submitted by Panagiotis Magonezos &Skevofulax on 21.05.2010

kamares

please add a caption here

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 20.05.2010

house potamos4

house potamos4

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 20.05.2010

house potamos3

House Potamos

History > Photography

submitted by Archaeological Institute Of Athens, Sydney on 17.05.2010

Goddess. Property of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens

Report by, Wayne Mullen, Executive Officer

The Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens was established in 1980 following negotiations with the Greek government. The Institute is similar to the other scholarly institutions in Athens maintained by major European and American countries. Some of these, such as the French School (École Française d'Athènes), the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the British School at Athens have existed for well over a century. In 2010 the AAIA turns thirty and although it receives no Government support it is well-established among the other sixteen Foreign Schools in the Greek capital.

The AAIA was founded by its current Director, Professor Alexander Cambitoglou who arrived in Australia in 1962 and became the first person of Greek background to be appointed a University Professor in this country. As Professor of Archaeology one of his early initiatives was to establish the first Australian Archaeological Expedition to Greece, to the site of Zagora on the island of Andros, and later on to the site of the ancient city of Torone which lies on the Sithonia peninsula in Chalkidike. He fostered this fieldwork through his personal and professional contacts in Greece, but knew that with his death or retirement Australian archaeological field work in the country would cease without the existence of formal Australian cultural representation in Athens.

Thus the idea of the AAIA was born, but its establishment was only achieved with great effort! And once it was in existence its growth was not guaranteed and has only been secured after years of hard work by the Director, by the staff and by the many, many supportive members of the public and of the Greek community who have helped it prosper. For his achievements Professor Cambitoglou has been honoured in this country with the award of an Order of Australia and in Greece with the award of an Order of the Phoenix, both granted for services to the discipline of Archaeology.

Fundamentally, therefore, the purpose of the Institute is to represent Australian scholars in Greece who wish to undertake archaeological research - which it does through applying for permits for fieldwork via the Greek Ministry of Culture. Its role, however, is very broad since its constitution supports the promotion of Hellenic culture in general, including Classical, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies.

To further these aims AAIA’s activities have become national and international in scope. Its Australia-wide membership includes many enthusiastic individuals, each of the major Universities in Australia that teach Classics, Ancient History or Archaeology and cultural organizations like the Powerhouse Museum and a number of high schools. We are proud, for instance, to include a high school from the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, St. Spyridon’s College, as one of our members as well as St Andrew’s Greek Orthodox Theological College. In addition Societies of Friends of the AAIA have been founded in each Australian state and in Athens. These groups offer scholarships and run public fund-raising events to support the AAIA and promote its aims.

One of its major contributions in Australia is the annual Visiting Professorship which brings a distinguished scholar from Europe or America to lecture and give seminars in all the major Universities of the country. Recently it has also created a Visiting Professorial Research Fellowship that will bring to Australia at regular intervals for a period of a few months a distinguished foreign scholar to do his or her research in Sydney.

Publishing represents an important part of its activities. It publishes two journals being partly responsible for the publication of its official journal, Mediterranean Archaeology and fully responsible for the publication of its Bulletin.

The Institute’s headquarters are in the University of Sydney where its main library for archaeologists is kept and where its administration is based. On campus it maintains strong connections with the Department of Classical Archaeology, the superb Nicholson Museum of antiquities and the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia with whom it shares many facilities.

The Institute also has an office in Athens which helps Australian scholars that need to carry out research in Greece and a hostel in that city as well. The hostel is a wonderful place, an apartment in Makriyianni close to the Acropolis and the new Museum that provides simple and decent accommodation for students, scholars and members of the public who choose to stay in it. In Athens the AAIA runs an academic programme of lectures and seminars for the local academic community and a summer school in collaboration with the Department of Classical Archaeology of the University of Sydney designed primarily for Australian university students. It offers a fellowship every second year and every year it offers a number of scholarships for students to travel to Greece. Last but not least it carries out fieldwork in Greece, presently at Torone in northern Greece, Zagora on the island of Andros and at Kythera. From 2009 it has also become a sponsor of the Australian Archaeological Mission to Paphos in Cyprus which excavates at the ancient city of Nea Paphos and its important theatre.

Last week the AAIA celebrated its thirtieth anniversary with a reception designed to acknowledge the Institute’s many achievements and the people involved with its establishment. This was held in the presence of the Chancellor of the University of Sydney, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC, CVO (who is also the President of the Institute), The Greek Ambassador, the Cypriot High Commissioner and the Greek Consul General.

The programme for the evening included a short speech by Professor Cambitoglou about the “Prehistory” of the AAIA which listed many of the personalities who were integral to the development of the Institute, a short talk entitled “The Northern Frontier: Greeks and Thracians in Ancient Argilos” by the AAIA’s Professorial Research Fellow, Professor Jacques Perreault. The event concluded with the award of the Institute’s inaugural gold medal for scholarly distinction in the Classics and Archaeology to the eminent academic Professor Graeme Clarke AO.was established in 1980 following negotiations with the Greek government. The Institute is similar to the other scholarly institutions in Athens maintained by major European and American countries. Some of these, such as the French School (École Française d'Athènes), the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the British School at Athens have existed for well over a century. In 2010 the AAIA turns thirty and although it receives no Government support it is well-established among the other sixteen Foreign Schools in the Greek capital.

The AAIA was founded by its current Director, Professor Alexander Cambitoglou who arrived in Australia in 1962 and became the first person of Greek background to be appointed a University Professor in this country. As Professor of Archaeology one of his early initiatives was to establish the first Australian Archaeological Expedition to Greece, to the site of Zagora on the island of Andros, and later on to the site of the ancient city of Torone which lies on the Sithonia peninsula in Chalkidike. He fostered this fieldwork through his personal and professional contacts in Greece, but knew that with his death or retirement Australian archaeological field work in the country would cease without the existence of formal Australian cultural representation in Athens.

Thus the idea of the AAIA was born, but its establishment was only achieved with great effort! And once it was in existence its growth was not guaranteed and has only been secured after years of hard work by the Director, by the staff and by the many, many supportive members of the public and of the Greek community who have helped it prosper. For his achievements Professor Cambitoglou has been honoured in this country with the award of an Order of Australia and in Greece with the award of an Order of the Phoenix, both granted for services to the discipline of Archaeology.

Fundamentally, therefore, the purpose of the Institute is to represent Australian scholars in Greece who wish to undertake archaeological research - which it does through applying for permits for fieldwork via the Greek Ministry of Culture. Its role, however, is very broad since its constitution supports the promotion of Hellenic culture in general, including Classical, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies.

To further these aims AAIA’s activities have become national and international in scope. Its Australia-wide membership includes many enthusiastic individuals, each of the major Universities in Australia that teach Classics, Ancient History or Archaeology and cultural organizations like the Powerhouse Museum and a number of high schools. We are proud, for instance, to include a high school from the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, St. Spyridon’s College, as one of our members as well as St Andrew’s Greek Orthodox Theological College. In addition Societies of Friends of the AAIA have been founded in each Australian state and in Athens. These groups offer scholarships and run public fund-raising events to support the AAIA and promote its aims.

One of its major contributions in Australia is the annual Visiting Professorship which brings a distinguished scholar from Europe or America to lecture and give seminars in all the major Universities of the country. Recently it has also created a Visiting Professorial Research Fellowship that will bring to Australia at regular intervals for a period of a few months a distinguished foreign scholar to do his or her research in Sydney.

Publishing represents an important part of its activities. It publishes two journals being partly responsible for the publication of its official journal, Mediterranean Archaeology and fully responsible for the publication of its Bulletin.

The Institute’s headquarters are in the University of Sydney where its main library for archaeologists is kept and where its administration is based. On campus it maintains strong connections with the Department of Classical Archaeology, the superb Nicholson Museum of antiquities and the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia with whom it shares many facilities.

The Institute also has an office in Athens which helps Australian scholars that need to carry out research in Greece and a hostel in that city as well. The hostel is a wonderful place, an apartment in Makriyianni close to the Acropolis and the new Museum that provides simple and decent accommodation for students, scholars and members of the public who choose to stay in it. In Athens the AAIA runs an academic programme of lectures and seminars for the local academic community and a summer school in collaboration with the Department of Classical Archaeology of the University of Sydney designed primarily for Australian university students. It offers a fellowship every second year and every year it offers a number of scholarships for students to travel to Greece. Last but not least it carries out fieldwork in Greece, presently at Torone in northern Greece, Zagora on the island of Andros and at Kythera. From 2009 it has also become a sponsor of the Australian Archaeological Mission to Paphos in Cyprus which excavates at the ancient city of Nea Paphos and its important theatre.

Last week the AAIA celebrated its thirtieth anniversary with a reception designed to acknowledge the Institute’s many achievements and the people involved with its establishment. This was held in the presence of the Chancellor of the University of Sydney, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC, CVO (who is also the President of the Institute), The Greek Ambassador, the Cypriot High Commissioner and the Greek Consul General.

The programme for the evening included a short speech by Professor Cambitoglou about the “Prehistory” of the AAIA which listed many of the personalities who were integral to the development of the Institute, a short talk entitled “The Northern Frontier: Greeks and Thracians in Ancient Argilos” by the AAIA’s Professorial Research Fellow, Professor Jacques Perreault. The event concluded with the award of the Institute’s inaugural gold medal for scholarly distinction in the Classics and Archaeology to the eminent academic Professor Graeme Clarke AO.

History > Photography

submitted by Archaeological Institute Of Athens, Sydney on 17.05.2010

The view of the Parthenon from the Institute's Hostel in Athens

Report by, Wayne Mullen, Executive Officer

The Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens was established in 1980 following negotiations with the Greek government. The Institute is similar to the other scholarly institutions in Athens maintained by major European and American countries. Some of these, such as the French School (École Française d'Athènes), the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the British School at Athens have existed for well over a century. In 2010 the AAIA turns thirty and although it receives no Government support it is well-established among the other sixteen Foreign Schools in the Greek capital.

The AAIA was founded by its current Director, Professor Alexander Cambitoglou who arrived in Australia in 1962 and became the first person of Greek background to be appointed a University Professor in this country. As Professor of Archaeology one of his early initiatives was to establish the first Australian Archaeological Expedition to Greece, to the site of Zagora on the island of Andros, and later on to the site of the ancient city of Torone which lies on the Sithonia peninsula in Chalkidike. He fostered this fieldwork through his personal and professional contacts in Greece, but knew that with his death or retirement Australian archaeological field work in the country would cease without the existence of formal Australian cultural representation in Athens.

Thus the idea of the AAIA was born, but its establishment was only achieved with great effort! And once it was in existence its growth was not guaranteed and has only been secured after years of hard work by the Director, by the staff and by the many, many supportive members of the public and of the Greek community who have helped it prosper. For his achievements Professor Cambitoglou has been honoured in this country with the award of an Order of Australia and in Greece with the award of an Order of the Phoenix, both granted for services to the discipline of Archaeology.

Fundamentally, therefore, the purpose of the Institute is to represent Australian scholars in Greece who wish to undertake archaeological research - which it does through applying for permits for fieldwork via the Greek Ministry of Culture. Its role, however, is very broad since its constitution supports the promotion of Hellenic culture in general, including Classical, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies.

To further these aims AAIA’s activities have become national and international in scope. Its Australia-wide membership includes many enthusiastic individuals, each of the major Universities in Australia that teach Classics, Ancient History or Archaeology and cultural organizations like the Powerhouse Museum and a number of high schools. We are proud, for instance, to include a high school from the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, St. Spyridon’s College, as one of our members as well as St Andrew’s Greek Orthodox Theological College. In addition Societies of Friends of the AAIA have been founded in each Australian state and in Athens. These groups offer scholarships and run public fund-raising events to support the AAIA and promote its aims.

One of its major contributions in Australia is the annual Visiting Professorship which brings a distinguished scholar from Europe or America to lecture and give seminars in all the major Universities of the country. Recently it has also created a Visiting Professorial Research Fellowship that will bring to Australia at regular intervals for a period of a few months a distinguished foreign scholar to do his or her research in Sydney.

Publishing represents an important part of its activities. It publishes two journals being partly responsible for the publication of its official journal, Mediterranean Archaeology and fully responsible for the publication of its Bulletin.

The Institute’s headquarters are in the University of Sydney where its main library for archaeologists is kept and where its administration is based. On campus it maintains strong connections with the Department of Classical Archaeology, the superb Nicholson Museum of antiquities and the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia with whom it shares many facilities.

The Institute also has an office in Athens which helps Australian scholars that need to carry out research in Greece and a hostel in that city as well. The hostel is a wonderful place, an apartment in Makriyianni close to the Acropolis and the new Museum that provides simple and decent accommodation for students, scholars and members of the public who choose to stay in it. In Athens the AAIA runs an academic programme of lectures and seminars for the local academic community and a summer school in collaboration with the Department of Classical Archaeology of the University of Sydney designed primarily for Australian university students. It offers a fellowship every second year and every year it offers a number of scholarships for students to travel to Greece. Last but not least it carries out fieldwork in Greece, presently at Torone in northern Greece, Zagora on the island of Andros and at Kythera. From 2009 it has also become a sponsor of the Australian Archaeological Mission to Paphos in Cyprus which excavates at the ancient city of Nea Paphos and its important theatre.

Last week the AAIA celebrated its thirtieth anniversary with a reception designed to acknowledge the Institute’s many achievements and the people involved with its establishment. This was held in the presence of the Chancellor of the University of Sydney, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC, CVO (who is also the President of the Institute), The Greek Ambassador, the Cypriot High Commissioner and the Greek Consul General.

The programme for the evening included a short speech by Professor Cambitoglou about the “Prehistory” of the AAIA which listed many of the personalities who were integral to the development of the Institute, a short talk entitled “The Northern Frontier: Greeks and Thracians in Ancient Argilos” by the AAIA’s Professorial Research Fellow, Professor Jacques Perreault. The event concluded with the award of the Institute’s inaugural gold medal for scholarly distinction in the Classics and Archaeology to the eminent academic Professor Graeme Clarke AO.

History > Photography

submitted by Archaeological Institute Of Athens, Sydney on 17.05.2010

Professor Alexander Cambitoglou, Founder of the Institute, with the Chancellor of the University of Sydney, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC, CVO , who is also the President of the Institute

Report by, Wayne Mullen, Executive Officer

The Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens was established in 1980 following negotiations with the Greek government. The Institute is similar to the other scholarly institutions in Athens maintained by major European and American countries. Some of these, such as the French School (École Française d'Athènes), the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the British School at Athens have existed for well over a century. In 2010 the AAIA turns thirty and although it receives no Government support it is well-established among the other sixteen Foreign Schools in the Greek capital.

The AAIA was founded by its current Director, Professor Alexander Cambitoglou who arrived in Australia in 1962 and became the first person of Greek background to be appointed a University Professor in this country. As Professor of Archaeology one of his early initiatives was to establish the first Australian Archaeological Expedition to Greece, to the site of Zagora on the island of Andros, and later on to the site of the ancient city of Torone which lies on the Sithonia peninsula in Chalkidike. He fostered this fieldwork through his personal and professional contacts in Greece, but knew that with his death or retirement Australian archaeological field work in the country would cease without the existence of formal Australian cultural representation in Athens.

Thus the idea of the AAIA was born, but its establishment was only achieved with great effort! And once it was in existence its growth was not guaranteed and has only been secured after years of hard work by the Director, by the staff and by the many, many supportive members of the public and of the Greek community who have helped it prosper. For his achievements Professor Cambitoglou has been honoured in this country with the award of an Order of Australia and in Greece with the award of an Order of the Phoenix, both granted for services to the discipline of Archaeology.

Fundamentally, therefore, the purpose of the Institute is to represent Australian scholars in Greece who wish to undertake archaeological research - which it does through applying for permits for fieldwork via the Greek Ministry of Culture. Its role, however, is very broad since its constitution supports the promotion of Hellenic culture in general, including Classical, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies.

To further these aims AAIA’s activities have become national and international in scope. Its Australia-wide membership includes many enthusiastic individuals, each of the major Universities in Australia that teach Classics, Ancient History or Archaeology and cultural organizations like the Powerhouse Museum and a number of high schools. We are proud, for instance, to include a high school from the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, St. Spyridon’s College, as one of our members as well as St Andrew’s Greek Orthodox Theological College. In addition Societies of Friends of the AAIA have been founded in each Australian state and in Athens. These groups offer scholarships and run public fund-raising events to support the AAIA and promote its aims.

One of its major contributions in Australia is the annual Visiting Professorship which brings a distinguished scholar from Europe or America to lecture and give seminars in all the major Universities of the country. Recently it has also created a Visiting Professorial Research Fellowship that will bring to Australia at regular intervals for a period of a few months a distinguished foreign scholar to do his or her research in Sydney.

Publishing represents an important part of its activities. It publishes two journals being partly responsible for the publication of its official journal, Mediterranean Archaeology and fully responsible for the publication of its Bulletin.

The Institute’s headquarters are in the University of Sydney where its main library for archaeologists is kept and where its administration is based. On campus it maintains strong connections with the Department of Classical Archaeology, the superb Nicholson Museum of antiquities and the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia with whom it shares many facilities.

The Institute also has an office in Athens which helps Australian scholars that need to carry out research in Greece and a hostel in that city as well. The hostel is a wonderful place, an apartment in Makriyianni close to the Acropolis and the new Museum that provides simple and decent accommodation for students, scholars and members of the public who choose to stay in it. In Athens the AAIA runs an academic programme of lectures and seminars for the local academic community and a summer school in collaboration with the Department of Classical Archaeology of the University of Sydney designed primarily for Australian university students. It offers a fellowship every second year and every year it offers a number of scholarships for students to travel to Greece. Last but not least it carries out fieldwork in Greece, presently at Torone in northern Greece, Zagora on the island of Andros and at Kythera. From 2009 it has also become a sponsor of the Australian Archaeological Mission to Paphos in Cyprus which excavates at the ancient city of Nea Paphos and its important theatre.

Last week the AAIA celebrated its thirtieth anniversary with a reception designed to acknowledge the Institute’s many achievements and the people involved with its establishment. This was held in the presence of the Chancellor of the University of Sydney, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC, CVO (who is also the President of the Institute), The Greek Ambassador, the Cypriot High Commissioner and the Greek Consul General.

The programme for the evening included a short speech by Professor Cambitoglou about the “Prehistory” of the AAIA which listed many of the personalities who were integral to the development of the Institute, a short talk entitled “The Northern Frontier: Greeks and Thracians in Ancient Argilos” by the AAIA’s Professorial Research Fellow, Professor Jacques Perreault. The event concluded with the award of the Institute’s inaugural gold medal for scholarly distinction in the Classics and Archaeology to the eminent academic Professor Graeme Clarke AO.

History > Photography

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 04.05.2010

2010 AHEPA Golf Tournament Brochure- OS

please add a caption here

History > Photography

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 04.05.2010

2010 AHEPA Golf Tournament Brochure

please add a caption here

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 02.05.2010

www.facebook.com

Facebook is a social networking website that connects people with friends and others who work, study and live around them or around the world. It is a great way to keep up with those you already know, reconnect with lost friends and family, and connect new people with similar interests.

There are many Kytherians on Facebook, and many Kytherian Group pages.

Kythera-family.net now has their own group page on Facebook. Come and join in!

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 02.05.2010

www.kythera-family.net is now on FACEBOOK.com

Facebook is a social networking website that connects people with friends and others who work, study and live around them or around the world. It is a great way to keep up with those you already know, reconnect with lost friends and family, and connect new people with similar interests.

There are many Kytherians on Facebook, and many Kytherian Group pages.

Kythera-family.net now has their own group page on Facebook. Come and join in!

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 01.05.2010

Alysia Sofios, Author of "Where Hope Begins: One Family's Journey Out of Tragedy-and the Reporter Who Helped Them Make It"

When local television reporter Alysia Sofios was assigned to investigate the worst mass murder in the history of Fresno, California, the breaking news lead soon became something much more -- a hope-filled relationship that changed the lives of both the young reporter and the survivors of an unimaginable crime.

FOR DECADES, the family of Marcus Wesson -- his wife, Elizabeth, and seventeen children -- lived sequestered in a social and emotional prison of Wesson's creation. None of the children ever had a childhood; going to school, playing with friends, going on dates -- all were forbidden. Together, they endured his tyrannical reign of physical, sexual, and mental abuse.

Then, in 2004, as a family confrontation erupted into a harrowing standoff, with police and SWAT teams descending on the small blue house on West Hammond Avenue, Marcus Wesson murdered nine of his children. The television reporter who got the first tip about Wesson's arrest, Alysia Sofios, would ultimately cover the case through Wesson's trial. She quickly learned that the surviving female family members -- Elizabeth, Rosie, Kiani, and Gypsy -- had nowhere to go but the streets. Torn between journalistic objectivity and her desire to help them, Sofios risked her job and her life by taking them into her home and helping integrate them into society.

Here, these brave survivors candidly recount their traumatic past and look to a bright future that now holds plans and dreams they never thought possible -- from college to careers to families of their own.

But the connections between Sofios and her newfound family deepened beyond anything anyone could have anticipated -- a bond of mutual caring and healing that was put to the test when Sofios suffered serious injuries in a car accident and found the Wesson women by her side to see her through her recovery.

Powerful, riveting, and truly remarkable, Where Hope Begins is a unique and intimate look at the resilience of the human spirit.

About the Author
Alysia Sofios is an award-winning journalist who is known in the Fresno area for her exclusive stories about the Marcus Wesson murders. She was the first reporter to hear about the story from police and the only reporter to obtain interviews with most of Wesson's family.
Sofios majored in journalism at Michigan State University. In 2000, she became a reporter and anchor at Fox affiliate WSYM in Lansing, Michigan. She was recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters for her work covering the local impact of the Iraq War. She later accepted a reporting position at Fox affiliate KMPH in Fresno, California, where she remains as a reporter. She has covered the Scott Peterson and Marcus Wesson trials. Several of her stories have appeared on Fox News and CNN.

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 01.05.2010

Where Hope Begins: One Family's Journey Out of Tragedy-and the Reporter Who Helped Them Make It, By Alysia Sofios

SURVIVORS OF THE MARCUS WESSON MURDERS SPEAK OUT FOR THE FIRST TIME-IN THIS SHATTERING AND INSPIRING TRUE STORY.

When local television reporter Alysia Sofios was assigned to investigate the worst mass murder in the history of Fresno, California, the breaking news lead soon became something much more -- a hope-filled relationship that changed the lives of both the young reporter and the survivors of an unimaginable crime.

FOR DECADES, the family of Marcus Wesson -- his wife, Elizabeth, and seventeen children -- lived sequestered in a social and emotional prison of Wesson's creation. None of the children ever had a childhood; going to school, playing with friends, going on dates -- all were forbidden. Together, they endured his tyrannical reign of physical, sexual, and mental abuse.

Then, in 2004, as a family confrontation erupted into a harrowing standoff, with police and SWAT teams descending on the small blue house on West Hammond Avenue, Marcus Wesson murdered nine of his children. The television reporter who got the first tip about Wesson's arrest, Alysia Sofios, would ultimately cover the case through Wesson's trial. She quickly learned that the surviving female family members -- Elizabeth, Rosie, Kiani, and Gypsy -- had nowhere to go but the streets. Torn between journalistic objectivity and her desire to help them, Sofios risked her job and her life by taking them into her home and helping integrate them into society.

Here, these brave survivors candidly recount their traumatic past and look to a bright future that now holds plans and dreams they never thought possible -- from college to careers to families of their own.

But the connections between Sofios and her newfound family deepened beyond anything anyone could have anticipated -- a bond of mutual caring and healing that was put to the test when Sofios suffered serious injuries in a car accident and found the Wesson women by her side to see her through her recovery.

Powerful, riveting, and truly remarkable, Where Hope Begins is a unique and intimate look at the resilience of the human spirit.

About the Author
Alysia Sofios is an award-winning journalist who is known in the Fresno area for her exclusive stories about the Marcus Wesson murders. She was the first reporter to hear about the story from police and the only reporter to obtain interviews with most of Wesson's family.
Sofios majored in journalism at Michigan State University. In 2000, she became a reporter and anchor at Fox affiliate WSYM in Lansing, Michigan. She was recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters for her work covering the local impact of the Iraq War. She later accepted a reporting position at Fox affiliate KMPH in Fresno, California, where she remains as a reporter. She has covered the Scott Peterson and Marcus Wesson trials. Several of her stories have appeared on Fox News and CNN.

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 13.04.2010

Helen Vatsikopoulos.

In conversation with Dr Maria HillI.

INVITATION to GLEBE BOOK EVENT this Wednesday 14th April at 6.30pm


would like to invite everyone to Glebe Books this Wednesday, 14th April, 2010. It should be a good night as Helen's husband Mark Corcoran will be MC ing the event and his report on the Greek Debt Crisis will be screened tomorrow on Foreign Correspondent so we might even have some heated about that as its been linked in the papers on the German occupation of Greece in WWII and the devastation that wrought upon the country.

Love to see you all there - George C Poulos

Cultural Trustee, Kytherian World Heritage Fund

Helen Vatsikopoulos in conversation with Maria Hill about her book
Diggers and Greeks: The Australian Campaigns in Greece and Crete

Gleebooks, 49 Glebe Point Rd, Glebe, Sydney

Wednesday, 14th April 2010 / 6.30 for 7pm


Dr Maria Hill is a military historian and is a Visiting Fellow UNSW@ADFA. She was born in Athens and came to Sydney at the age of three. Her father Theodore Costadopoulos, an industrial chemist from Pyrgos in the Peloponesse had arrived in Australia a few years earlier. Her mother Emilia born in Athens opened up her own dressmaking salon in Newtown. After completing high school Maria spent a gap year in Athens working at the Australian Embassy.

Returning to Australia Maria graduated with honours in history from UNSW. She is the author with Ian Bickerton of Contested Spaces: the Historiography of the Arab-Israeli Conflict published by McGraw-Hill in 2003.

Her current book that examines the relationship that was forged between Australian soldiers and their Greek allies during the Greek and Crete campaigns is the culmination of eight years of research and writing.

Helen Vatsikopoulos, Australian journalist and news presenter for SBS and ABC was born in Florina in northern Greece where her father, Petros, was a peasant farmer. Her mother, Victoria, who wanted better things for her only child, organised the family migration to Adelaide in 1965, when Helen was four.

Helen Vatsikopoulos has hosted Dateline current affairs program on SBS and Asia Pacific Focus on the ABC. Currently she is studying and lecturing at the University of Technology in Sydney. Her insight on Greece is reflected in her recent stories for Foreign Correspondent: Acropolis Now, where she tackled the contentious issue of the return of the Greek sculptures to the Acropolis, screened 5/11/2008 and Greek Tragedy dealing with the Greek Riots triggered by the shooting of a young Greek boy in Athens, shown on 26/6/2009.

Cost: only $10/$7 conc. gleeclub welcome

Book:

Gleebooks - 9660 2333

or

Request a place by logging onto

http://www.gleebooks.com.au/default.asp?p=events/welcome4_htm

Dr Maria Hill

Visiting Fellow UNSW@ADFA

Professional Historian

maria@mariahill.com.au

0438 007 560 (Mob)

websites:

http://www.mariahill.com.au

http://www.diggersandgreeks.com.au


OUT NOW: Diggers and Greeks: The Australian Campaigns in Greece and Crete

Purchase the book through the <i>Kytherian World Heritage Fund

Cost $60 + $10 postage and handling

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 27.03.2010

Alexa Conomos - blogs about her 100 year old grandmother, Penelope Conomos

Alexa Conomos created a video blog for the 100th birthday of her giagia, Penelope Conomos on March 25th, 2010. Penelope was born in Agia Anastasia.

Watch the Video by clicking on this link