kythera family kythera family
  

Vintage Portraits/ People

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

Showing 181 - 200 from 365 entries
Show: sorted by:

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 24.11.2005

Koroneos Family, Karavas, uryazzi-ing - ploughing. 1930's.

Koroneos family.

My Pappou, Triunduphilo Theothosios Koroneos, as a young man in his thirties is on the far left.

His father, my great-grandfather, Theothosios Yanni Koroneos is on the far right - aged about 70, and hoe in hand - still working very, very hard.
Another picture including my great-grandfather and great-grandmother taken in 1939, can be found at
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=104-111&did=5692-1&searchResult=searchResult

My mothers best guess is that the woman standing next to Triunduophilo is his cousin Tassia, "Epismo" - known as "Epsimitsa".

The names of the other women, also with hoes in hand, and also working hard - to be advised.

Triunduphilo would be the only one of his 8 brothers and sisters not to migrate permanently to Australia, or the USA. John Koroneos (Crown), and Zufiria migrated to the USA.

Theothosios had two wives, (?).......and Stamatoko.

To his first wife he had three children:

(?)Zufiria
Erophili
Yannis.

She died in childbirth, during the delivery of a "fourth" child.

To his second wife he had 6 children:

Nikola
Chrisanthe (married, Katsoolis)
Maria (married Kritheri, Brisbane)
George
Jim

Triunduphilo was the only one of his 8 brothers and sisters to remain on Kythera.

In 1928, accompanied by one of Erophili's children, Jack Vanges, of California Cafe, fame (Nyngan, NSW), Triunduphilo emigrated to Australia. Jack "took to" Australia almost immediately, [see a photograph of the California Cafe, Nyngan, at:
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=117-119&did=7076-1&searchResult=searchResult
- but his cousin Triunduphilo could not get used to the country, was very unhappy here - and he returned to Karavas, Kythera.

My mother tells me that her father left for Australia when she was born. She realls as a two year old the day he returned to Karavas. Kosta Aplitos Kritharis, told her to run up and greet him, and kiss his hand....she did run over...and kissed the hand of the wrong person.

Triunduphilo was a prominent figure in the affairs of Karavas for 40 years. He later became the mayor of Karavas for more than a decade. Amongst other achievements, he was instrumental in helping to create the "mollo" at Plattia Ammos.

During the 1970's he came to Australia for a visit; his only other visit to Australia. To see a photograph of Triunduphilo during his second visit, go to:
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=117-118&did=8003

Other than being re-united with his six children, I am not sure he enjoyed Australia that much more, the second time around.

Triunduphilo's children Angie (Poulos), Manuel, and Voula (Logus) translated his name "Rose" to Phillip, when naming their children.

Jack Vanges daughters, Lilly and Helen, always used the cute epithet "Uncle Rosy" when referring to Triunduphilo.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Phillip Con Poulos on 06.08.2005

Vangelli Haralambos Hlihlis Tzortzopoulos.

A typical Vangelli profile.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 05.08.2005

Christy Freeleagus pictured at left.

On the Freeleagus farm in Kythera, Greece.

Can anyone specify the location?

Clearly there were many more windmills in existence 70 years ago on Kythera, than are currently extant there?

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 30.08.2005

Christoforos Melasofaos Coroneos's, mother.

Her son, Christophoros Melasofaos Coroneos, born in Karavas, Kythera, came to Australia, & married, Melopomeni Comino, started a café in Gunning, named The Busy Bee.

Photographs of Coroneos family (Gunning) grandparents, parents, brothers and sisters, the family tree, family documents, and the Busy Bee, Gunning, are also all available at other locations on the web-site. [Search internally under Coroneos, or Melasofaos.]

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 29.07.2005

Charles and Kirranni Conomos.

Parents of Melopemi Comino, later to marry Chritophoros Melasofaos Coroneos.

Christophoros Coroneos & Melopomeni Comino from Karava in Kythera, came to Australia, where they started a café in Gunning, named The Busy Bee.

Photographs of their parents, children, the family tree, family documents, and the Busy Bee, Gunning, are also all available at other locations on the web-site. [Search internally under Coroneos, or Melasofaos.]

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 09.11.2005

Coroneos Family, Melasofaos Karavas.

Photographs of Coroneos family (Gunning) grandparents.

Left: Minas Cominos and his wife (?). They did not have any children.

Standing: Melpomeni Cominos.

Standing: Peter Hilos Tzortzopoulos (Monaro Cafe, Goulburn, later to move to Red Hill in Canberra). Wife is Marouli, wife of Peter, holding a baby (chidren of Peter and Marouli).

Elderly couple are the parents of Melpomeni Conimos, Charles and Kirranni Cominos.

Christophoros Melasofaos Coroneos & Melopomeni Comino from Karava in Kythera, who came to Australia, where they started a café in Gunning, named The Busy Bee.

Photographs of their parents, brothers and sisters, children, the family tree, family documents, and the Busy Bee, Gunning, are also all available at other locations on the web-site. [Search internally under Coroneos, or Melasofaos.]

****************CONGRATULATIONS****************

******FIRST PRIZE******FIRST PRIZE*****FIRST PRIZE

OCHI DAY 2005 Photographic Award

Announcement of the Karavitiko Symposium Best Photograph of Person/Group Portraits - of people from Karavas.

Prize: A$250

The winner is: Mrs Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos), Kensington, Sydney.

The Selection Committee awarded this photograph the prize for the following reasons: "It was felt that perosn depicted in the photograph from the 1920's, have such a large number of Karaviti decendants, largely in Australia, but many on Kythera. The photograph thus binds many Karavithes together".

Matty would like to re-donate the prize.

To be awarded on Greek National Day (GND), 25th March, 2006.

The new prize becomes the GND 2006 Coroneos ("Melasafaos") Prize, for Best Photograph of Person/Group Portraits - of people from Karavas.


****************CONGRATULATIONS****************

******FIRST PRIZE******FIRST PRIZE*****FIRST PRIZE

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by John George PRINEAS on 30.06.2005

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by John George PRINEAS on 30.06.2005

OATH Of The Greek Soldier

From the Army discharge papers of my father George P Prineas.
Translation by John G Prineas
======
OATH (Of the Soldier)
I Swear to be faithful to my Country and the Constitutional King Of the Greeks, obedience to the constitution, the Laws and the Legislation of the Nation, Submission to my superiors,
to perform their commands promptly and without contradiction,
to defend with faith and devotion to the last drop of my blood our Flags, never to abandon them nor separate from them, and to obey faithfully the military laws, and to perform as a faithful and honourable Soldier .

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by John George PRINEAS on 30.06.2005

George Peter Prineas

George Peter Prineas (Melehas)
This is his ID/Pass Card while he was serving in the British Peace Police in the Balkans in 1919-20. (Vretaniki Apostoli Astinomias)He returned as volunteer from the United States to serve in Greece.
Note. The Greek writing introduces him and also includes: that, even without uniform, he is allowed to circulate freely during the night,and to enter free in any public entertainment...(Theatres etc.)

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by John George PRINEAS on 30.06.2005

Prineas George and Stratoula

Wedding photo of my father George P. Prineas (Melehas) who married
Stratoula Tsaousi (Viaros) from Viaradika. Married in 1928, my mother
Stratoula was 20yo.
My father died in 1975 after many trips to Austarlia and back.
He was 80-years-old.
My mother Stratoula is still going strong and in October 2005 will be 97yo.
Children??? Look up next photo...

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 06.05.2005

Triunduphilo Koroneos & Yeorgia Koroneos (nee, Mentis).

My mothers parents. My mother is Envangalia (Angela) Coroneos, Gilgandra, of Pendle Hill, NSW.

Triunduphilos was for more than a decade Mayor of Karavas. He was the only one of his brothers and sisters to remain on Kythera.

Some second cousins in Australia always referred to Triunduphilo as Uncle Rosie. Triunduphilos was translated to Phillip in Australia, by the Coroneos clan. The direct translation Rose was considered unsuitable.

My bother Phillip Poulos, and two first cousins, Phillip Logus (son of Harry Logus, and Voula Coroneos) and Phillip Coroneos (eldest son of Emmanuel Coroneos and Katina Lazanas), carry my grandfathers name.

Two of my first cousins carry her name - Yeorgia (Georgia) Logus, (daughter of Harry Logus, and Voula Coroneos) Melbourne, and Georgia Coroneos, (daughter of Emmanuel Coroneos and Katina Lazanas), Sydney.

The photograph was taken in c. 1940's.

She died tragically in child-birth whilst giving birth to her 7th child.

This photograph is owned by my aunty, Helen Calligeros (nee, Coroneos), formerly of Dubbo, but now living in Canberra.

If you look carefully you can see that Yeorgia is pregnant. This photograph is taken a few months before both she and her child would die in childbirth.

This followed a trend in the family - my Great-grandfather Theothosios - also lost his first wife - Zufaria in childbirth. He was so devastated by her death - that he walked away from the house in which they lived - and never returned to it. The house is now iripio - in ruins.

Death during childbirth was common in Kythera during the 19th and early 20th century. It is a theme which demands far more attention on kythera-family.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 21.09.2007

Yeorgia Koroneos (nee, Mentis), with her three eldest children.

My mothers mother.

My mother is Envangalia (Angela) Coroneos, originally of Gilgandra, and later of Pendle Hill, NSW. She is sitting on Yeorgia's lap in this photograph.

To the right is her older sister Stamatoula (Toula), later to marry a Vaggis (Vanges) - and to live in Germany for many years. In later life she moved to Australia, where she was tragically killed in a road accident near Bathurst, New South Wales, on the way to visiting her younger brother and sister, Manuel and Voula, in Gilgandra, NSW. She was 49 years of age. Her two youngest sons, George and Nick, then aged 21 and 19, were also killed in the car accident. The date was the 25th December 1975.

On the right hand side is her older brother Theo Koroneos (Corones), later to lose a leg to infection, and become a prominent artist of Kythera. He drove taxi's in Sydney for many years, before retiring to Bargara, in Northern Queensland.

The photograph was taken in c. 1930.

Two of my first cousins carry her name - Yeorgia (Georgia) Logus, (daughter of Harry Logus, and Voula Coroneos) Melbourne, and Georgia Coroneos, (daughter of Emmanuel Coroneos and Katina Lazanas), Sydney.

The grande matriarche of Karavas, Louisa Psaltis (nee, Kritharis) [See, People, subsection High Achievers section for details about Louisa's life], was a close friend of Yeorgia Mentis. Louisa described her as the prettiest and most vivacious young girl of her generation.

Yeoryia married Triunduphilo Theothosios Koroneos Belos, from Karavas.

She died tragically in child-birth whilst giving birth to her 7th child.

This followed a trend in the family - my Great-grandfather Theothosios - also lost his first wife - Zufaria in childbirth. He was so devastated by her death - that he walked away from the house in which they lived - and never returned to it. The house is now iripio - in ruins.

Death during childbirth was common in Kythera during the 19th and early 20th century. It is a theme which demands far more attention on kythera-family.

Other Photographs of Theo

Theo, in 1960, at age 35, alongside his brothers and sisters

Theo, later life, in retirement in the North Queensland coastal village of Bargara

Other photographs of Angie

Angie at age 12, with her mother and 5 brothers and sisters

Angie in a Wyong, NSW, orchard, newly arrived from Kythera

Angie Poulos on her on her wedding day

Angie at age 32, taken in 1960, alongside her other 5 Koroneos brothers and sisters who had subsequently emigrated to Australia
The history of the Kytherian presence in Gilgandra, where Angie lived for a quarter of a century

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 06.05.2005

Yeorgia Mentis. As a young woman in her early twenties.

From a photograph already posted to the website - re: embarkation from Kythera to Australia of Nick Coroneos (son of Theothosios Belos of Karavas, and his new bride Panayotitsa (Pat) Kritharis (Pat Coroneos, North Parrammatta, Sydney).

Yeorgia is my mothers mother. [My mother is Envangalia (Angela) Coroneos, Gilgandra, and Pendle Hill, NSW.]

My guess is Yeoryia is in her 30's in this photograph.

Two of my first cousins carry her name - Yeorgia (Georgia) Logus, (daughter of Harry Logus, and Voula Coroneos) Melbourne, and Georgia Coroneos, (daughter of Emmanuel Coroneos and Katina Lazanas), Sydney.

The grande matriarche of Karavas, Louisa Psaltis (nee, Kritharis) [See, People, subsection High Achievers section for details about Louisa's life], was a close friend of Yeorgia Mentis. Louisa described her as the prettiest and most vivacious young girl of her generation. This sparkling, almost "cheeky" nature is evident in this photograph.

Yeoryia married Triunduphilo Theothosios Koroneos Belos, from Karavas.

She died tragically in child-birth whilst giving birth to her 7th child.

This followed a trend in the family - my Great-grandfather Theothosios - also lost his first wife - Zufaria in childbirth. He was so devastated by her death - that he walked away from the house in which they lived - and never returned to it. The house is now iripio - in ruins.

Death during childbirth was common in Kythera during the 19th and early 20th century. It is a theme which demands far more attention on kythera-family.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 19.06.2005

Yeorgia Koroneos (nee, Mentis). Karavas.

My mothers mother. [My mother is Envangalia (Angela) Coroneos, Gilgandra, and Pendle Hill, NSW.]

My guess is Yeoryia is in her 30's in this photograph.

Two of my first cousins carry her name - Yeorgia (Georgia) Logus, (daughter of Harry Logus, and Voula Coroneos) Melbourne, and Georgia Coroneos, (daughter of Emmanuel Coroneos and Katina Lazanas), Sydney.

The grande matriarche of Karavas, Louisa Psaltis (nee, Kritharis) [See, People, subsection High Achievers section for details about Louisa's life], was a close friend of Yeorgia Mentis. Louisa described her as the prettiest and most vivacious young girl of her generation.

Yeoryia married Triunduphilo Theothosios Koroneos Belos, from Karavas.

She died tragically in child-birth whilst giving birth to her 7th child.

This followed a trend in the family - my Great-grandfather Theothosios - also lost his first wife - Zufaria in childbirth. He was so devastated by her death - that he walked away from the house in which they lived - and never returned to it. The house is now iripio - in ruins.

Death during childbirth was common in Kythera during the 19th and early 20th century. It is a theme which demands far more attention on kythera-family.

A generation prior

My great-grandmother, Eleni [my grandmothers mother] derived from the island of Paros. My great-grandfather - Nickolas - was a fisherman and fish-seller who travelled to other islands in pursuit of his trade. Eleni worked as a servant-girl on Paros. He met her there, fell in love with her - and proposed marriage to her. He brought her back to the island of Kythera to live.

The couple had a huge family - 6 girls and 6 boys; most of whom left the island.

My grandmother Yeorgia was the youngest of the 12 children.

Not all of the family are known to me:

Boys included:

1. Dimitrios
2. Vangelli
3. Polychronis [Migrated to Africa, and was never heard of again]
4. Aristotelis
5. ?
6. ?

Girls included:

1. Grigoria [Married a Karathimos]
2. Aryiro - moved to Pireaus
3. Thespina - moved to USA
4. Maria.
5. Polixeni
6. Yeorgia

My mother spent many years of her childhood living with her grandmother Eleni as a psixo kori - soul daughter. This was a common practice in Kythera.

My great grandmother could not read or write, and so my mother used to read and write her letters for her.

As a young girl Thespina was sent to Smyrna. We don't know at what point she returned to Greece. At age 16 she sailed to the United States and was married soon thereafter.
Thespina maintained contact with her mother over many years. My mother recalls writing letters to Thespina, and reading the letters from Thespina to her grandmother.

Thespina would regularly send money to Eleni from the USA - which the postman always delivered to my great-grandmother personally.

I did not know any of this history until contacted by Touy Houzouris, from Baltimore, Maryland, USA, in May 2005, during her visit to Sydney. We were discussing our relationship through our grandfathers via the Tzortzopoulos soi - the Hlihlis and the Georgakas - when she mentioned that her grandmother was a Mentis and we quickly established that our grandmothers were sisters.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 26.04.2005

(Tzortzopoulos) gathering.

Home of Tony Levantis, whose mother was Katina Tzorztopoulos, Karavas. On the occasion of the wedding of Paul Dermatis, son of Dora Dermatis, and grandson of Minas (Tzortzo)Poulos, and Irene.

Left to Right:

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Stephen Samios on 03.03.2005

George Panayotopoulos, representative for Kythera in the Ionian Parliament of 1863.

When making his inaugural speech in the Legislative Council, [see History, subsection, Documents, for a copy of the entire speech], Jim stated that:

"One cannot stand in the hallowed atmosphere of this ancient Chamber without sensing an aura of history when remembering the giants that bestrode it—men who by their conduct and service gave credence to the role of the second chamber as a bastion of freedom, vigilance and above all courage in our democratic society. And was it not Pericles who some 2 500 years ago said, The secret of liberty is courage.

Indeed it is with feeling that I stand here and recall the election of my great, great grandfather, George Panayotopoulos of Kythera, Greece, to another Legislative Council, that of the Ioanian Islands in 1863—then a protectorate of the United Kingdom. It was, I believe, largely as a result of that historic link between the United Kingdom and the Ioanian Islands that the migration of Greeks to Australia commenced last century".

The photgraph of the Ionian Parliament of 1863, was the previous entry. This photograph (under glass) was supplied by the Hon. Jim Samios, former Deputy Liberal leader in the Legislative Council, the Upper House in the Parliament of New South Wales.

In the original, George Panayotopoulos, is in the back row - 4th from the right. (He is the man with the beard, whose head is "framed" by the two pillars).

This photograph is a close-up of him, taken from the original.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Stephen Samios on 03.03.2005

Ionian Parliament Meeting on Reunification with Greece, 23rd September, 1863.

From a photograph (under glass) supplied by the Hon. Jim Samios, former Deputy Liberal leader in the Legislative Council, the Upper House in the Parliament of New South Wales.

When making his inaugural speech in the Legislative Council, [see History, subsection, Documents, for a copy of the entire speech], Jim stated that:

"One cannot stand in the hallowed atmosphere of this ancient Chamber without sensing an aura of history when remembering the giants that bestrode it—men who by their conduct and service gave credence to the role of the second chamber as a bastion of freedom, vigilance and above all courage in our democratic society. And was it not Pericles who some 2 500 years ago said, The secret of liberty is courage.

Indeed it is with feeling that I stand here and recall the election of my great, great grandfather, George Panayotopoulos of Kythera, Greece, to another Legislative Council, that of the Ioanian Islands in 1863—then a protectorate of the United Kingdom. It was, I believe, largely as a result of that historic link between the United Kingdom and the Ioanian Islands that the migration of Greeks to Australia commenced last century".

George Panayotopoulos, is in the back row - 4th from the right. (He is the man with the beard, whose head is "framed" by the two pillars). A close-up of him, taken from the photograph, can be seen as the next entry.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Chris Goopy on 20.02.2005

Theodore Haralambos Catsoulis

My grandfather, Theodore, was born in Potamos in 1878. He was a farmer, a guard at the Palace in Athens, and later, in Australia, a cafe owner, then again a farmer. Most of all, he was a wonderful husband and father, and to me, the most perfect grandfather. He died in 1953, leaving a huge gap in our family. I loved his gentleness, kindness, patience and his unlimited love for his family. He came to Australia on the Grosser Kurfurst, around 1904/5. He married my grandmother, Chrisanthe Coronoes on 29th December, 1903/4. Her mother was Stavroula Megaloconomos, who died at age 104... Nona died in 1965, was born in 1881, also in Potamos.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by James Gavriles on 20.02.2005

Corner of my Grandfather's house in Logothetianica

A shot of the corner at Papoo's house in Logothetianica

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by James Gavriles on 20.02.2005

Uncle Theodore Gavrilys at the rear door of Papoo's house

My Uncle Theodore Gavrilys at the rear door to my Papoo's house in Logothetianica