kythera family kythera family
  

Signs & Statues

Photos > Signs & Statues

Showing 21 - 40 from 101 entries
Show: sorted by:

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Peter Condoleon on 11.05.2010

Viaradika Village Sign

Viaradika Village signpost

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Kytherian Historical Record on 26.10.2008

Government of Pireaus. Map.

ΝΟΜAΡΧΙA ΠΕΙΡAΙA.

Aκτή Ποσειδώνος 14-16, 185 31 Πειραιάς,
Tηλ: 210 4148516 Fax: 210 4134492
Γραμμή επικοινωνίας: 1570

www.nomarhiapeiraia.gr


Email, here



The Government of Pireaus is not confined to the seaside southern area of Athens, but extends to other parts of the mainland, and to other islands such as Aegina, Poros, Ithra, & Spetses. The islands furthest from the mainland which are adminstered by Pireaus are Kythera and Antikythera.

This map makes the administrative area of Pireaus very clear.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 18.11.2008

Map, showing clearly the turnoff down to Lourandianika.

(Top, upper, centre of the map)

Also showing that the road ends at the village, so that the village is located at a cul-de-sac or dead end.

Also the relationship of Lourandianka to Kato Livathi, Livathi, Kalamos, Hora & Kapsali.

The map has been added here in response to a plea in the Sept 2008 Newsletter, from Maria (Marcellos) Whyte.

Maria's email here

"I respectfully ask for any assistance my fellow Kytherians may be able to give me, as a tribute to my family, not to allow Louradianika be forgotten. I have no photos, only memories which are as vivid today, as they were when I was a girl of 15, but I would like to share this village of happy memories with my fellow Kytherians".

There is only one entry road to the village of Lourandianika, because about 50 metres past the small church of Ayios Yeoryi the road ends.

Although it is not clear from the road sign photographs, the road runs off to Lourandianika on an angle at the signpost, (and not on the same plane as Firi Ammos and Kalamos).

View of the signpost from behind and above, towards Kato Livathi

Map showing clearly the turnoff down to Lourandianika

The church of Ayios Yeoryi is small, but extremely well maintained. I had not read the Newsletter at the time I visited, so I did not not look carefully for, or at, the gravesites around the church.

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing North

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing South

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View across the rooftop at sunset

Cousin Theo Poulos and I were stunned by the quality of the fully sealed tarred road that leads to this cul-de-sac. If every road on the island was sealed to this quality, then.....

There are about 5 houses in the village. We met the elderly residents who live in the last well maintained traditional cottage.

House at the end of the road in Lourandianika

Elderly male. Lourandianika. 2008

The elderly lady declined to be photographed.

Frontage of the last house on the road to Lourandianika

Ruined House. Towards the end of the road leading to Lourandianika

Looking into the ruined house, Lourandianika

Stable wall at sunset. Lourandianika, 2008

The second last house on the left as you drive to the Church is quite large, modern, and extremely well maintained. Unfortunately by the time we went to photograph it, the night had set it, and our photographs did not develop properly.

The village of Lourandianika gave us the impression of our own village, Karavas - an idyllic setting, far from noise, cares, and woes. A little world unto itself.

See more photographs of Lourandianika at:

http://picasaweb.google.gr/Maxine195/LOURANDIANIKA2008_11_0202?authkey=LXqkcJvLb2Q#

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 18.11.2008

Looking from behind & above the signpost to Lourandianika, with the village of Kato Livathi in the background.

This will help you to understand the relationship between the turn off to Lourandianika and the village of Kato Livathi.

The photograph of this signpost has been added here in response to a plea in the Sept 2008 Newsletter, from Maria (Marcellos) Whyte.

Maria's email here

"I respectfully ask for any assistance my fellow Kytherians may be able to give me, as a tribute to my family, not to allow Louradianika be forgotten. I have no photos, only memories which are as vivid today, as they were when I was a girl of 15, but I would like to share this village of happy memories with my fellow Kytherians".

There is only one entry road to the village of Lourandianika, because about 50 metres past the small church of Ayios Yeoryi the road ends.

Although it is not clear from the photograph, the road runs off to Lourandianika on an angle at the signpost, (and not on the same plane as Firi Ammos and Kalamos).

View of the signpost from behind and above, towards Kato Livathi

Map showing clearly the turnoff down to Lourandianika

The church of Ayios Yeoryi is small, but extremely well maintained. I had not read the Newsletter at the time I visited, so I did not not look carefully for, or at, the gravesites around the church.

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing North

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing South

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View across the rooftop at sunset

Cousin Theo Poulos and I were stunned by the quality of the fully sealed tarred road that leads to this cul-de-sac. If every road on the island was sealed to this quality, then.....

There are about 5 houses in the village. We met the elderly residents who live in the last well maintained traditional cottage.

House at the end of the road in Lourandianika

Elderly male. Lourandianika. 2008

The elderly lady declined to be photographed.

Frontage of the last house on the road to Lourandianika

Ruined House. Towards the end of the road leading to Lourandianika

Looking into the ruined house, Lourandianika

Stable wall at sunset. Lourandianika, 2008

The second last house on the left as you drive to the Church is quite large, modern, and extremely well maintained. Unfortunately by the time we went to photograph it, the night had set it, and our photographs did not develop properly.

The village of Lourandianika gave us the impression of our own village, Karavas - an idyllic setting, far from noise, cares, and woes. A little world unto itself.

See more photographs of Lourandianika at:

http://picasaweb.google.gr/Maxine195/LOURANDIANIKA2008_11_0202?authkey=LXqkcJvLb2Q#

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 18.11.2008

The road to Lourandianika, from a position above Kato Livathi

The photograph of this signpost has been added here in response to a plea in the Sept 2008 Newsletter, from Maria (Marcellos) Whyte.

Maria's email here

"I respectfully ask for any assistance my fellow Kytherians may be able to give me, as a tribute to my family, not to allow Louradianika be forgotten. I have no photos, only memories which are as vivid today, as they were when I was a girl of 15, but I would like to share this village of happy memories with my fellow Kytherians".

There is only one entry road to the village of Lourandianika, because about 50 metres past the small church of Ayios Yeoryi the road ends.

Although it is not clear from the photograph, the road runs off to Lourandianika on an angle at the signpost, (and not on the same plane as Firi Ammos and Kalamos).

View of the signpost from behind and above, towards Kato Livathi

Map showing clearly the turnoff down to Lourandianika

The church of Ayios Yeoryi is small, but extremely well maintained. I had not read the Newsletter at the time I visited, so I did not not look carefully for, or at, the gravesites around the church.

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing North

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing South

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View across the rooftop at sunset

Cousin Theo Poulos and I were stunned by the quality of the fully sealed tarred road that leads to this cul-de-sac. If every road on the island was sealed to this quality, then.....

There are about 5 houses in the village. We met the elderly residents who live in the last well maintained traditional cottage.

House at the end of the road in Lourandianika

Elderly male. Lourandianika. 2008

The elderly lady declined to be photographed.

Frontage of the last house on the road to Lourandianika

Ruined House. Towards the end of the road leading to Lourandianika

Looking into the ruined house, Lourandianika

Stable wall at sunset. Lourandianika, 2008

The second last house on the left as you drive to the Church is quite large, modern, and extremely well maintained. Unfortunately by the time we went to photograph it, the night had set it, and our photographs did not develop properly.

The village of Lourandianika gave us the impression of our own village, Karavas - an idyllic setting, far from noise, cares, and woes. A little world unto itself.

See more photographs of Lourandianika at:

http://picasaweb.google.gr/Maxine195/LOURANDIANIKA2008_11_0202?authkey=LXqkcJvLb2Q#

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Vardas on 03.09.2008

Menu board at Limnionas

This menu board adorns the sole cafe at Limnionas Beach.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 11.08.2008

Proposed Flag for Kythera. Proposal 1. Proposal utilising one of (wo)mankind's most ancient, primal and powerful symbols.

[[picture:"Kythera Venus Flag Yellow.jpg" ID:8944]]

The original symbol for Aphrodite - Venus (Venus is the Romanised version of Kythera's Aphrodite).

To appreciate the power and primal nature of this symbol - go to:

Symbols.com Online Encyclopaedia of Western signs and ideograms

http://www.symbols.com/encyclopedia/41a/41a7.html

This is also the symbol used by astronomers to designate the planet Venus (Aphrodite).

The symbol above, has been created by moving the cross from the outside of the circle, and placing it on the inside of the circle. The symbol created in this way would be unique to Kythera.

Symbols as the prime form of human communication

The word symbol first entered the English language in about 1434. It derives from both the Greek word symbolon; a "token, or watchword", and from the Latin, symbolum meaning "creed, summary, religious belief, token, and mark". It was applied, for example,in c.250 by Cyprian of Carthage to the Apostles' Creed, in particular, the notion of the "mark" that distinguishes Christians from pagans.

The Greek and Latin derivation for the word symbolom is - syn - "together" + the stem of ballein "to throw." The word thus evolves from the notion of "throwing things together" to "contrasting" to "comparing" to "token used in comparisons to determine if something is genuine." Ultimately it came to mean - an "outward sign" of something. The meaning "something which stands for something else" was first recorded in 1590 (in "Faerie Queene"). The word Symbolic is attested from 1680.

The nature of the symbol and the process of symbolization are deeply rooted in the human nervous system. The relationship of that system to consciousness, thought and subjectivity is complex, and not clearly understood by "experts"; such as cognitive psychologists, linguists, neuroscientists, etc., let alone "lay" persons.

Homo Sapiens have become sapient (wise, clever), because of his/her ability to allow symbols to "stand in the place" of something else. Homo Sapien became clever by being first of all Homo Symbolos.

Symbolic systems, once adopted, can generate very complex systems, and extraordinary levels of knowledge. Consider mathematical symbols such as π (pi) and + (plus) and - (minus) and 0 (zero), the latter derived from Arab intellectuals, which represent "mere" quantities - but which have generated that vast, dynamic body of knowledge called, Mathematics. The practical use of mathematical knowledge has had an extraordinary impact on human life on planet Earth.

Speaking about flags, but he could equally well be speaking about Coats of Arms, or colours, or Medals; the American vexillologist Dr Whitney Smith argued that these symbolic artefacts are a "manifestation of a wider and still older form of human activity, the making of symbols."

Symbolism, he says, distinguishes between those characteristics that are significant, and those that are not. Smith believes that the symbolism attaching to the artefacts mentioned above, can best be understood if we have an appreciation of some of the other forms of symbolism that are commonly used. Briefly, according to Smith, these are divided into 4 categories: active, verbal, concrete and graphic.

Active symbolism, as the name suggests, denotes action: extending the right hand in friendship (shaking hands), the raising of a clenched fist, saluting a flag or even burning a flag.

Verbal symbolism takes the form of written or spoken words, such as the text of a national anthem or reciting an oath of allegiance.

Concrete symbolism occurs when an existing object is imbued with a special symbolic meaning; for example, Mytrtidia on Kythera, a sacred tree, like the Portokalia (Orange Tree) of Karavas, or, in the Australian context, Uluru (formerly called Ayers Rock).

Finally, graphic symbolism can be used on artefacts of power, involving the drawn symbol, such as for example, the "Greek" cross, the crescent of Mohammed, or the symbol for Aphrodite/Venus, later adopted in the West as the symbol for all womanhood; and particular colours, (red for workers rights, Green for Mohammed, green and gold for Australia, and ...?... and ...?... for Kythera.)

Wikipedia concurs that "symbols can also be analysed by parsing them into the artifact and the metafact. An artifact is a humanly constructed object that can be perceived by the senses. It can be seen, heard, smelled, tasted, touched, or felt. In contrast, a metafact is a human constructed object that can only be held in the mind. A favorite song, the concept of a nation or a cause, or the idea of economic value are each metafacts. When artifacts and metafacts combine, they form a symbol. A woven piece of cloth is just an artifact until it is invested with the metafact of a cause or a nation, then it becomes a flag, and that flag is a symbol. A stamped piece of metal is just an oddly shaped bit of metal until the stamped image stands for a measure of economic value, then it becomes a coin. The difference is in the metafact captured in the symbol".

Symbols then, can be "ciphers" or "denoters" or "markers" or "operators". And they can perform all of these functions simultaneously.

By performing these functions symbols are also tranducers of power. When a relgious person on Kythera, for example, venerates the Christian cross, he or she is not venerating two lines juxtaposed at right angles to each other.

He or she is reverencing the icon in order to transcend the limitations of his/her own sense of self, the limitations of average human ability and the average state of consciousness, the limitations of materiality, the limitations of time and space, ie. the limitations of self-enclosed and self-absorbed "personal" powerlessnes.

The word transcendence entered the English language in about 1340 AD. It derives from the Latin, transcendere - to "climb over or beyond, surmount," from trans- "beyond" + scandere "to climb".

Transcendentalism was first recorded 1803, in reference to the philosophy of the German philosopher Immanuel Kant; and was applied in 1842 to the religio-philosophical views of Ralph Waldo Emerson and similar New England (USA) thinkers.

To transcend, is

1. To pass beyond the limits of: emotions that transcend understanding.
2. To be greater than, as in intensity or power; surpass: love that transcends infatuation.
3. To exist above and independent of (material experience or the universe): “One never can see the thing in itself, because the mind does not transcend phenomena” (Hilaire Belloc).

Transcend also denotes

4. Surpassing others; preeminent or supreme.
5. Lying beyond the ordinary range of perception: “fails to achieve a transcendent significance in suffering and squalor” (National Review).
6.Philosophy.
a. Transcending the Aristotelian categories.
b. In Kant’s theory of knowledge, being beyond the limits of experience and hence unknowable.
7. Being above and independent of the material universe. Used of the Deity (God).

Transcendence is a meta-physical concept.

The human motivation to understand, believe in, and to reverence an icon leads to an infusion of (transcendant) power.

Great icons infuse great power. Human beings can transduce great power from great icons.

Symbols of Heraldic and Governmental Power

Albeit at a lower level of the psychological heirarchy, individuals can also transcend their self-absorption, isolation and enclosure, by a civic regard for their family; and at another level, their town or community; at a still higher level for their province; and at a still higher level again, for their nation-state.

At every level of that heirarchy appropriate symbols of power and authority can serve to empower the individual, and to validate his or her core values and identity.

Individuals alllow certain artefacts to "stand in the place" of a sense of collective empowerment. This process occurs at levels of the political heirarchy.

The central and iconic symbols of power and authority in Nation-States, "provinces", and local government authorities are the following:

Flag

Coat of Arms

Medals of Honour, both Civic and Military.

Anthem.

Colours.

Natural symbols of identity; gemstones, metals, flora, fauna, etc.

Countries, provinces, and municipalities that value their unique sense of identity, ensure that a Central Heraldic Authority is in place - to determine, maintain, and change, where appropriate - the central symbols of identity. Examples of Central Authorities which have fulfilled this function admirably are The College of Heralds, London - for the residents and citizens of England, and The Canadian Heraldic Authority - for the residents and citizens of Canada.

Australia should have inaugurated an Australian Heraldic Authority in 1897, in the lead up to Federation in 1901. This authority should have supervised the choice of Flag, in 1901, and would have ensured that official Australian Coats of Arms, Anthem, etc were in place by that date. As it was, Australia did not enter Federation with an official Coat of Arms. The hastily adopted Coat of Arms of 1908, was an inferior design. This abomination was dispensed with in 1912. It would be another 83 years before Australia adopted its own National Anthem and its own National colours.

Contrast the Australian and the American experience of civic iconography. The "flag of a foreign nation" was removed from the flag of the United States, even before the American War of Independence had ceased. The American Coat of Arms is unique and intrinsically American, as is the National Anthem. Americans would never countenance national iconography that was not derived from their history, their sense of "place", and their intrinsic sense of identity.

Some countries, such as Australia, and municipalities, such as Kythera, lack the self-belief and self-confidence to establish a Central Heraldic Authority, and further, to ensure that ALL symbols of identity, power and authority reflect their intrinsic sense of identity, and their intrinsic sense of "place".

The result is, in Australia's case, the perpetuation of "foreign" or external symbols of identity, well beyond the time, when such symbols infuse or evoke a sense of power, and therefore, serve to unify the citizenry around a central symbol.

The result in Kythera's case is the perpetuation of an "inferiority complex" - ...our little island is not worthy of taking ownership of, and of exercising such exalted symbols of power...."

It is now time that this attitude, and the practice of "living without symbols of power" - cease.

Kythera must, as soon as possible, adopt a Municipal and Island Flag, a Municipal and Island Coat of Arms, an anthem, Municipal Colours, etc etc.

It must be understood that the Heraldic significance and power for these symbols, the Kytherian Flag, and the Kytherian Coat of Arms will derive directly from the Hellenic Republic, and be vested in the Head of State, the President of the Hellenic Republic.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Institute Of Kytheraismos on 05.08.2008

Kytheraismos Institute. LOGO.

Heroon Polytechniou 81
Postal Code 185 36, Piraeus

Tel.: 003 210 45 99 414
Fax: 003 210 45 99 415

e-mail: info@kytheraismos.gr

Website: www.kytheraismos.gr

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 24.08.2007

New sign for the village of Karavas

40 is the speed limit in kilometres...not the population of the town.

Far fewer than 40 people live in the village of Karavas on a permanent basis

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 24.08.2007

Sign to the Springs of Karavas.

Located`in central Karavas.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 24.08.2007

Panayia Thespina.

Vouno.

Road sign.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 24.08.2007

Karithyanika. Mailboxes for residents on the left as you turn onto the road that leads to Karithyanika.

Driving from Karavas to Potamos, a left turn about 3 and a half kilometres from Karavas.

Great houses, on the bluffs, owned by Europeans, with views across to Niapoli and Laffonissi

My friend, Steve James, (English National), lives there.

The roads to, and around Karithyanika are badly in need of sealing by the Dimo.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 24.08.2007

Karithyanika turn off.

Driving from Karavas to Potamos, a left turn about 3 and a half kilometres from Karavas.

Great houses, on the bluffs, owned by Europeans, with views across to Niapoli and Laffonissi

My friend, Steve James, (English National), lives there.

The roads to, and around Karithyanika are badly in need of sealing by the Dimo.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by George Poulos on 24.08.2007

Karithyanika.

Driving from Karavas to Potamos, a left turn about 3 and a half kilometres from Karavas.

Great houses, owned by Europeans, with views across to Niapoli and Laffonissi

My friend, Steve James, (English National), lives there.

The roads to, and around Karithyanika are badly in need of sealing by the Dimo.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 16.06.2007

Plaque on Kapsali house Re- Gloucester Sinking

I received this photograph from James Prineas while he was in Kythera. There have been a number of these on this site but it is so important to the Kytherian history, so, once more, will possibly reach some new members of kythera-family.net

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Chris Alfred on 07.03.2006

Xristoforianika

Why is Chris missing from this photo?

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Chris Alfred on 07.03.2006

Xeroniamata

Once a thriving metropolis. Now a little sign.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Chris Alfred on 07.03.2006

Varipatianika

My Greek is better now. I know not to block the road.

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Chris Alfred on 07.03.2006

Vamvakaradika

Vamvakaradika sign

Photos > Signs & Statues

submitted by Chris Alfred on 07.03.2006

Tzouanianika

Tzouanianika sign