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submitted by James Victor Prineas on 30.03.2008

Earthquake on Kythera 2006

The BBC article regarding the Earthquake.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata

Evacuating an elderly wheelchair-bound villager,

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – an off-limits street in Mitata

Houses on the left are marked with the red cross in a circle which indicates they are not safe to enter.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – ruins of a house in Mitata

The ruins of an old house or of outbuildings at the SW end of the village, just where the Viaradika road begins.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – ruins of a house in Mitata

The ruins of an old house or of outbuildings at the SW end of the village, just where the Viaradika road begins.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata church, a window

A lancet window in the upper part of the NW bell tower. The internal staircase has completely collapsed, filling the shaft with rubble.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata church, north-west bell tower

The whole tower could come down at any moment, with the upper part essentially supported on a single crumbling pier. The rubble-and-mortar construction, largely responsible for the collapse of the building, is clearly visible.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata church, southern facade

Large rents are evident in the bell tower, and damage to the central section can also be seen; most of the windows have collapsed.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata village

Sections of the village considered unsafe were fenced off with tape by police and civil engineers.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Looking across Mitata square towards Viaradika

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata-Viaradika road blocked

This is where the front part of Mitata square ended up...

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata, the next day

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 - Mitata cafe in the evening

The earthquake which struck just south of Kythera at 1.34 pm local time on Sunday (11.34 GMT) was unusually severe, and at 6.9 on the Richter scale could have been devastating. Fortunately the epicentre was in the very deep waters between Kythera and Crete, and as a result there have been no casualties and surprisingly little damage. The principal exception was the village of Mitata, which because of its location and the nature of the ground it is built on has always been vulnerable to earthquakes. Part of the main square slid into the ravine, the road to Viaradika is blocked, a number of older rubble-built houses have collapsed in part or in whole, and the 1900s church is a complete write-off, with huge rents appearing in the bell towers and the front façade.

The villagers gathered in the local café, where they were joined by police, fire brigade, local councillors and, by early evening, engineers and representatives of the Piraeus administration; the prefect of Piraeus, Yannis Michas, was expected to fly in on a Chinook helicopter later tonight.

There were also reports of damage to one or two houses in Kapsali and Goudianika, but little else so far. The monastery of Myrtidia appears to have weathered this earthquake as it has all the previous ones. So far, there are no reports of an injuries.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 - meeting in Mitata

The earthquake which struck just south of Kythera at 1.34 pm local time on Sunday (11.34 GMT) was unusually severe, and at 6.9 on the Richter scale could have been devastating. Fortunately the epicentre was in the very deep waters between Kythera and Crete, and as a result there have been no casualties and surprisingly little damage. The principal exception was the village of Mitata, which because of its location and the nature of the ground it is built on has always been vulnerable to earthquakes. Part of the main square slid into the ravine, the road to Viaradika is blocked, a number of older rubble-built houses have collapsed in part or in whole, and the 1900s church is a complete write-off, with huge rents appearing in the bell towers and the front façade.

The villagers gathered in the local café, where they were joined by police, fire brigade, local councillors and, by early evening, engineers and representatives of the Piraeus administration; the prefect of Piraeus, Yannis Michas, was expected to fly in on a Chinook helicopter later tonight.

There were also reports of damage to one or two houses in Kapsali and Goudianika, but little else so far. The monastery of Myrtidia appears to have weathered this earthquake as it has all the previous ones. So far, there are no reports of an injuries.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 - Mitata house

The earthquake which struck just south of Kythera at 1.34 pm local time on Sunday (11.34 GMT) was unusually severe, and at 6.9 on the Richter scale could have been devastating. Fortunately the epicentre was in the very deep waters between Kythera and Crete, and as a result there have been no casualties and surprisingly little damage. The principal exception was the village of Mitata, which because of its location and the nature of the ground it is built on has always been vulnerable to earthquakes. Part of the main square slid into the ravine, the road to Viaradika is blocked, a number of older rubble-built houses have collapsed in part or in whole, and the 1900s church is a complete write-off, with huge rents appearing in the bell towers and the front façade.

The villagers gathered in the local café, where they were joined by police, fire brigade, local councillors and, by early evening, engineers and representatives of the Piraeus administration; the prefect of Piraeus, Yannis Michas, was expected to fly in on a Chinook helicopter later tonight.

There were also reports of damage to one or two houses in Kapsali and Goudianika, but little else so far. The monastery of Myrtidia appears to have weathered this earthquake as it has all the previous ones. So far, there are no reports of an injuries.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 - Mitata church

The earthquake which struck just south of Kythera at 1.34 pm local time on Sunday (11.34 GMT) was unusually severe, and at 6.9 on the Richter scale could have been devastating. Fortunately the epicentre was in the very deep waters between Kythera and Crete, and as a result there have been no casualties and surprisingly little damage. The principal exception was the village of Mitata, which because of its location and the nature of the ground it is built on has always been vulnerable to earthquakes. Part of the main square slid into the ravine, the road to Viaradika is blocked, a number of older rubble-built houses have collapsed in part or in whole, and the 1900s church is a complete write-off, with huge rents appearing in the bell towers and the front façade.

The villagers gathered in the local café, where they were joined by police, fire brigade, local councillors and, by early evening, engineers and representatives of the Piraeus administration; the prefect of Piraeus, Yannis Michas, was expected to fly in on a Chinook helicopter later tonight.

There were also reports of damage to one or two houses in Kapsali and Goudianika, but little else so far. The monastery of Myrtidia appears to have weathered this earthquake as it has all the previous ones. So far, there are no reports of an injuries.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by George Poulos on 30.10.2004

Manuel Coroneos, George Miller, and Dimitri Miller, picnic, Chinchilla.

Manuel Coroneos, George Miller, and Dimitri Miller, picnic, Chinchilla.

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submitted by George Poulos on 01.06.2004

Mad Max 2 - Also known as the Road Warrior in the USA

Mad Max 2 - Also known as the Road Warrior in the USA

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submitted by George Poulos on 24.05.2004

Byron Kennedy at the start of Mad Max II

Byron Kennedy at the start of Mad Max II

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by George Poulos on 23.05.2004

Thunderdome Movie Poster

Thunderdome Movie Poster