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submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata church, southern facade

Large rents are evident in the bell tower, and damage to the central section can also be seen; most of the windows have collapsed.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata village

Sections of the village considered unsafe were fenced off with tape by police and civil engineers.

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Looking across Mitata square towards Viaradika

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata-Viaradika road blocked

This is where the front part of Mitata square ended up...

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 – Mitata, the next day

Kythera airport was unusually crowded this morning, with a couple of helicopters including a large Chinook on the tarmac, as well as a four-engined army transport plane which had flown in extra firemen and civil defence personnel. Mitata was also crawling with television crews and their satellite broadcast equipment; the Kythera earthquake, despite the merciful absence of victims, has had a starring role in the Greek media today.

The region’s civil engineers have been hard at work, checking buildings and marking those deemed at risk with a red cross in a circle; almost all the latter were in Mitata, except for a few isolated cases in Goudianika, Potamos and Kapsali. All the affected buildings were unoccupied, most of them for years – a good thing, as the night of Sunday to Monday was bitterly cold; widespread damage leading to the evacuation of homes would have resulted in serious problems.

The most visible damage has been to Mitata church; completely rebuilt after the earthquake of 1903 and recently extensively renovated, it is unfortunately a complete write-off and will have to be demolished. The village priest was allowed in briefly today to recuperate the church vessels, but otherwise the building is strictly off limits. There is already talk locally of rebuilding on a different site, this time well away from the treacherously unstable cliff edge.

The priority now will be on repairs and reconstruction, with the hazardous demolition of the precariously standing church high on the list of priorities. With one eye on forthcoming municipal elections, the regional and central governments have been making positive noises about providing emergency funding. It seems Kythera is fated to live through at least one natural emergency every winter; two years ago it was flooding, last year it was landslides, and now a major earthquake. Thankfully, in all three cases the only victim has been the island’s infrastructure.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 - Mitata cafe in the evening

The earthquake which struck just south of Kythera at 1.34 pm local time on Sunday (11.34 GMT) was unusually severe, and at 6.9 on the Richter scale could have been devastating. Fortunately the epicentre was in the very deep waters between Kythera and Crete, and as a result there have been no casualties and surprisingly little damage. The principal exception was the village of Mitata, which because of its location and the nature of the ground it is built on has always been vulnerable to earthquakes. Part of the main square slid into the ravine, the road to Viaradika is blocked, a number of older rubble-built houses have collapsed in part or in whole, and the 1900s church is a complete write-off, with huge rents appearing in the bell towers and the front façade.

The villagers gathered in the local café, where they were joined by police, fire brigade, local councillors and, by early evening, engineers and representatives of the Piraeus administration; the prefect of Piraeus, Yannis Michas, was expected to fly in on a Chinook helicopter later tonight.

There were also reports of damage to one or two houses in Kapsali and Goudianika, but little else so far. The monastery of Myrtidia appears to have weathered this earthquake as it has all the previous ones. So far, there are no reports of an injuries.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 - meeting in Mitata

The earthquake which struck just south of Kythera at 1.34 pm local time on Sunday (11.34 GMT) was unusually severe, and at 6.9 on the Richter scale could have been devastating. Fortunately the epicentre was in the very deep waters between Kythera and Crete, and as a result there have been no casualties and surprisingly little damage. The principal exception was the village of Mitata, which because of its location and the nature of the ground it is built on has always been vulnerable to earthquakes. Part of the main square slid into the ravine, the road to Viaradika is blocked, a number of older rubble-built houses have collapsed in part or in whole, and the 1900s church is a complete write-off, with huge rents appearing in the bell towers and the front façade.

The villagers gathered in the local café, where they were joined by police, fire brigade, local councillors and, by early evening, engineers and representatives of the Piraeus administration; the prefect of Piraeus, Yannis Michas, was expected to fly in on a Chinook helicopter later tonight.

There were also reports of damage to one or two houses in Kapsali and Goudianika, but little else so far. The monastery of Myrtidia appears to have weathered this earthquake as it has all the previous ones. So far, there are no reports of an injuries.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 - Mitata house

The earthquake which struck just south of Kythera at 1.34 pm local time on Sunday (11.34 GMT) was unusually severe, and at 6.9 on the Richter scale could have been devastating. Fortunately the epicentre was in the very deep waters between Kythera and Crete, and as a result there have been no casualties and surprisingly little damage. The principal exception was the village of Mitata, which because of its location and the nature of the ground it is built on has always been vulnerable to earthquakes. Part of the main square slid into the ravine, the road to Viaradika is blocked, a number of older rubble-built houses have collapsed in part or in whole, and the 1900s church is a complete write-off, with huge rents appearing in the bell towers and the front façade.

The villagers gathered in the local café, where they were joined by police, fire brigade, local councillors and, by early evening, engineers and representatives of the Piraeus administration; the prefect of Piraeus, Yannis Michas, was expected to fly in on a Chinook helicopter later tonight.

There were also reports of damage to one or two houses in Kapsali and Goudianika, but little else so far. The monastery of Myrtidia appears to have weathered this earthquake as it has all the previous ones. So far, there are no reports of an injuries.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John Stathatos on 09.01.2006

Earthquake of 8.1.2006 - Mitata church

The earthquake which struck just south of Kythera at 1.34 pm local time on Sunday (11.34 GMT) was unusually severe, and at 6.9 on the Richter scale could have been devastating. Fortunately the epicentre was in the very deep waters between Kythera and Crete, and as a result there have been no casualties and surprisingly little damage. The principal exception was the village of Mitata, which because of its location and the nature of the ground it is built on has always been vulnerable to earthquakes. Part of the main square slid into the ravine, the road to Viaradika is blocked, a number of older rubble-built houses have collapsed in part or in whole, and the 1900s church is a complete write-off, with huge rents appearing in the bell towers and the front façade.

The villagers gathered in the local café, where they were joined by police, fire brigade, local councillors and, by early evening, engineers and representatives of the Piraeus administration; the prefect of Piraeus, Yannis Michas, was expected to fly in on a Chinook helicopter later tonight.

There were also reports of damage to one or two houses in Kapsali and Goudianika, but little else so far. The monastery of Myrtidia appears to have weathered this earthquake as it has all the previous ones. So far, there are no reports of an injuries.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.04.2016

Café Culture Exhibition Murwillumbah

L to R
Mrs Helen Theo Comino (nee Comino)
Theo Steve Patrick
Mrs Kathy Theo Patrick (nee Comino)
Mrs Stella Theo Castrisos (nee Comino)
Mrs Immy McKiernan

Helen and Kathy are the daughters of Peter Angelo Comino (Psilos) of Manilla and Temora.
Helen married Theo Peter Comino (Douris), the brother of Steve and Jack Comino of the Tweed Fruit Exchange, Murwillumbah.
Stella, the daughter of Arthur Stavrianos Comino (Douris), is the first cousin of Steve and Jack.
Theo, who married Helen’s sister Kathy, is the son of Steve Minas Patrick of the Bellevue Cafe Tweed Heads. Their daughter married Stella's son, George Castrisos.
And the photographer is connected through a great aunt, Irene Tsicalas, who married Nick Stavrianos Comino (Douris), the brother of Arthur and Peter.
(There’s a free hamburger at the Psaltis café, Mullumbimby, for anyone who can find an unconnected Kytherian.)

And hats off to Immy McKiernan who has worked 25hrs a day, 8 days a week, for the last few months putting the exhibition together. She has managed to track down some rare stuff, including embossed crockery from Mark Cassimatis’s Civic Café and Con Vlismas’s Austral Café, both at Murbah.
The café counter mock-up is the real thing, salvaged from the Austral Café during renovations carried out by Immy over her period as proprietor.

The exhibition is a must see. It’s at the ‘City of the Arts Space’ (the old Art Gallery), Tumbulgum Road, Murwillumbah, and runs till 14Oct2005.

[Steve and Jack Comino relieved Nick Anthony Koukoulis (aka Coocooles and Nichles) in 1939, but in 1943 when they went into partnership with the Varela Bros the café part of the business was relegated to a sideline as they developed the fruit and veggie side of the enterprise, which included a carrier business supplying shops all over the place. By the time they sold out to the Varelas in 1951 the Tweed Fruit Exchange was Murbah’s largest fruit shop, and remains so in the hands of the Pouloudis Bros.

Nick Koukoulis also features at Tweed Heads, where he acquired the Patrick Bros Bellevue Café in early 1921, leaving Steve and Con Patrick as managers or partners while he proceeded to buy up the whole monopoly board.
Immy found a 1924 advert that shows him owning the Bellevue Café at Murbah, the Bellevue at Tweed Heads, the Bellevue at Roma, the Victoria in South Brisbane and the Aktaiton at Redcliffe. (There’s another free hamburger for anyone who can figure out what Aktaiton means and what marketing strategy he had in mind in naming a café as such.)
Around late 1924 he added the Capitol Café in Coolangatta to the portfolio and a year or so later is believed to have established or acquired the Classic Milk Bar at Goulburn. He took up full time residence at Murbah in 1932 and subsequently owned 3 cafes in town; the Capitol Café, the American Store and The Regent Café. But by the time he sold out to Steve and Jack Comino in 1939 he seems to have consolidated with the Continental Café.]

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by Stephen Samios on 19.05.2005

Nicholas Aroney

"I'm the son of Theodore Nicholas Aroney and Helen Aroney (nee Fardoulis).

My paternal grandparents were Nicholas Theodore Aroney and Stella Aroney (nee Kepreotis).

My father's siblings are Victor Aroney and Helen Parry.

My maternal grandparents were Emmanuel Constantine Fardoulis and Gregoria Fardoulis (nee Cassimatis).

The parents of Emmanuel were Constantine and Eleni Fardoulis.

The parents of Gregoria were Petro and Maria Cassimatis.

My mother's siblings are Constantine Fardoulis, Petro Fardoulis and Maria Johnstone.

I am married to Lisa Gwenneth (nee Grant). Our children are Michelle Maree (12), Samuel Theodore (10), Nathaniel Thomas (7) and Josiah Emmanuel (2)".

Senior Lecturer
Faculty of Law
University of Queensland

Contact Details:
Room: W363
Building: GPN 3
Campus: St Lucia
Phone +61 7 3365 3053
Fax:
Email: n.aroney@law.uq.edu.au

Availability: By Appointment - preferably made by email; Tuesday 4:00pm-6:00pm

Executive Summary: Nicholas Aroney teaches Constitutional Law, Comparative Constitutional Law and Legal Theory. He has published extensively in these fields, including recent publications in the Journal of Legal History and the Federal Law Review. He also speaks regularly at overseas and interstate conferences.

Dr Aroney's book Freedom of Speech in the Constitution (1998) has been widely reviewed, and his PhD thesis, which won the Mollie Holman Doctoral Medal at Monash University, is shortly to be published under the title, The Constitution of a Federal Commonwealth: The Making and Meaning of the Australian Constitution. He is also working on a further book, to be published by Ashgate Press (UK) under the title, Constitutional Federalism: Theory and Practice.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by Georgia Cassimatis on 12.05.2005

Georgia Cassimatis.

Georgia Cassimatis began her career as a writer on Australian Cosmopolitan magazine in 1996. After a two year stint, she freelanced for various magazines before being appointed the Editor for teen magazine Barbie. During her time there she met an American man and moved to Los Angeles, which saw her world open up in ways she'd never imagined: she has since worked as a Los Angeles based writer, reporting for lucrative US titles Glamour, Cosmopolitan, Teen and Marie Claire magazines, as well as have her work syndicated internationally.

Born in Australia, Georgia is of Greek decent: her paternal grandfather, John Cassimatis, was born in 1902 in Kythera in the town of Potamos, where his Father was a priest known as Papa Nikolaki. His Mother was Ekaterini Levouni, also of Potamos. He was the 11th of 12 children. Of the nine surviving children, four went to live in Athens and five came to live in Australia, where they had cafes along the Murray River towns. Her grandfather worked in Swan Hill until 1936.

Georgia's paternal grandmother was Georgia Koroneos born in 1917. The second of six children, her father was Panagiotis Koroneos (Poulakis) from Karava and Ayia Pelayia. He was also the President of the Kytherian Society in Athens in the 1930's. Two of his sons went to the USA, and one the aeronautical Engineer returned to live out his life in Agia Pelagia, and the other, became a senator in the Greek parliament.

Panagiotis Koroneos built the wharf at Ayia Pelayia and came to Australia in the late 1950s to find fund raising for the wharf, which lead his travels to many NSW and Queensland towns visiting Kytherians. There is a plaque commemorating his achievement on the wharf.

Georgia Koroneos' mother was Hrisanthi Koroneos who was brought up in the town of Baltimore in the USA where Panagiotis married her, had three kids and returned to Greece.

Georgia's own father, Nicholas Cassimatis, was born in Australia and is a well-known Sydney psychiatrist. Her mother is Anglo Australian with some German blood and loves the Greeks and Kytherian family. Actually her anglo maternal grandfather came to Australia later than her Kytherian forebearers. And Georgia looks Kytherian.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by Anthony Zantis on 21.10.2006

Anthony

Children of Peter and Helen Zantis (nee, Levantis).

Studio Portrait - Goulburn NSW..

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by Anthony Zantis on 21.10.2006

Anthony Zantis.

Children of Peter and Helen Zantis (nee Levantis).

Rear of Fruit Shop - Goulburn NSW.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by Anthony Zantis on 05.05.2005

Zantis Formely Zantiotis Peter

 Later to move to Goulburn in NSW, were he owned and operated a fruit shop.

Married to Helen Levantis, they had two children, Tanya and Anthony.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by Anthony Zantis on 05.05.2005

Helen Levantis, on her wedding day. Goulburn. NSW.

 Daughter of Tasso Levantis, and Katina (nee, Tzortzopoulos).

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John George PRINEAS on 25.04.2005

Four Generations Photo

Maria Psltis was celebrating her 80th birthday, in 1989. On the left in Arthur Psaltis, the then surviving brother of the Cumberland Cafe Partnership, next to him Maria Psaltis the widow of Cosma Psaltis, Her daughter Anne (Now my wife Anne Prineas) Our Daughter Esther, married to Dr. Peter Calligeros (Standing) and their children John and James Calligeros. There are four generations present.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John George PRINEAS on 27.02.2016

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John George PRINEAS on 25.04.2005

Cumberland Cafe (INTERIOR)

The Interior of Cumberland Cafe as it appeared in a the advertisement of a special edition of Parramatta and district.

Photos > Miscellaneous

submitted by John George PRINEAS on 25.04.2005

Cumberland Cafe Parramatta (EXTERIOR)

Cumberland Cafe Church Street, Parramatta. Year of Photo 1938.