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Island Social Life / Potamos

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submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 11.10.2015

magnificent

what a lunch at one of kytheras finest restaurants ..Panaretos in the platia at potamos

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submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 09.10.2015

dancing the night away !!

a packed potamo platia at this years panayia dance on the 15th august ... potamo now is rapidly becoming the night entertainment village of the island with new bars and a new night club opening recently

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 17.09.2015

time for a rest !!

avli bar potamo .... by day ...

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 16.09.2015

of all the gin joints in all the villagers and all the island !!!

new little bar in central potamo called avli , perfect for a cool drink in august and to watch the world go by !!!

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 04.09.2015

dining out !

two great eating venues in lower potamos the nearer the best yiro restaurant on the island and karinos cafeneo for coffee and light meals... while the national bank of Greece watches on !!!

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 12.05.2014

come on in !!

in the summer everybody sits outdoors , but in winter ,the cold keeps everybody inside the cafeneos of kythera , here all the patrons of KAPINOS in potamo , enjoy the company of each other in the nice and warm interior....

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by George Poulos on 04.01.2014

Singing in the New Year

One of the most endearing Greek / Kytherian traditions is "singing in the New Year". Children go around the island in large groups, or in smaller groups (like these two young girls outside Astikon in Potamos), or as individuals.

They carry a triangle with them, ask the person or shop owner whether they can sing in Xmas / the New Year / Epithany, and after singing their carol, they are rewarded with money, which is put into a money box, which they carry with them.


From the explorecrete website:

Greek Christmas Carols , New Year and Epiphany Carols

A very old custom which remains today practically unchanged is the Greek Christmas carols, which is called calanda in Greek. Children, in groups of two or more, still make the rounds of houses singing carols, usually accompanied by the triangle or guitars, accordions or harmonicas.

The children go from house to house, knock on doors and ask: "shall we say them?" If the homeowner's answer is yes, the kids sing the Christmas carols for several minutes before finishing up with the wish, "And for the next year, many happy returns." Years ago the homeowners offered the children holiday sweets and pastries, but today they usually give them some money.

The carols are sung on the eves of Christmas, New Year and Epiphany, and they are different for each holiday.

History of Christmas Carols in Greece

The word calanda stems from the Latin calenda, which translates as "the beginning of the month." It is believed that the history of caroling goes deep into the past and connects with ancient Greece. In fact, they have even found carols written in those distant past days which are similar to the ones sung today. In ancient times the word for carols was Eiresioni , and children of that era held an effigy of a ship which depicted the arrival of the god Dionysos. Other times they held an olive or laurel branch decorated with red and white threads, on which they would tie the offerings of the homeowners.

This Eiresioni song from the Homeric period can still be heard today - with small changes - in the carols of Thrace:

In this house we came of the rich-landlord
May its doors open for the wealth to roll in
The wealth and happiness and desired peace should enter
And may its clay jugs fill with honey, wine and oil
And the kneading tub with rising dough.

Following are the Greek carols for each of the three holidays: Christmas Carols, New Year Carols and Epiphany Carols.

GREEK CHRISTMAS CAROLS

Good day lords
If it's your bidding
Of the Christ's divine birth
I will tell in your manse

Christ is being born today
In the town of Bethlehem
The heavens rejoice
And all creation delights

In the cave he is born
Within the horse manger
The king of the heavens
And Maker of all . . .

GREEK NEW YEAR CAROLS

First of the month and first of the year
My tall rosemary
Let our good year begin
Church with the holy throne

It is the beginning when Christ
Holy and spiritual
Will walk on earth
And cheer us up

St. Basil is on his way
And will not deign on us
From Kesaria
You're a Lady milady

GREEK EPIPHANY CAROLS

Today is the lights and the enlightment
The happiness is big and the sanctification

Down the Jordan River
Sits our Lady the Blessed Virgin Mary

She carries an organ, a candle she holds
And pleads with St. John.

St. John lord and Baptist
Baptize this divine child of mine

I shall ascend to the heavens
To gather roses and incense

Good day, good day
Good day to you master and the missus.

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by George Poulos on 04.01.2014

Singing in the New Year

One of the most endearing Greek / Kytherian traditions is "singing in the New Year". Children go around the island in large groups (like this one singing in the New Year at the National Bank of Greece in Potamos), or in smaller groups, or as individuals.

They carry a triangle with them, ask the person or shop owner whether they can sing in Xmas / the New Year / Epithany, and after singing their carol, they are rewarded with money, which is put into a money box, which they carry with them.


From the explorecrete website:

Greek Christmas Carols , New Year and Epiphany Carols

A very old custom which remains today practically unchanged is the Greek Christmas carols, which is called calanda in Greek. Children, in groups of two or more, still make the rounds of houses singing carols, usually accompanied by the triangle or guitars, accordions or harmonicas.

The children go from house to house, knock on doors and ask: "shall we say them?" If the homeowner's answer is yes, the kids sing the Christmas carols for several minutes before finishing up with the wish, "And for the next year, many happy returns." Years ago the homeowners offered the children holiday sweets and pastries, but today they usually give them some money.

The carols are sung on the eves of Christmas, New Year and Epiphany, and they are different for each holiday.

History of Christmas Carols in Greece

The word calanda stems from the Latin calenda, which translates as "the beginning of the month." It is believed that the history of caroling goes deep into the past and connects with ancient Greece. In fact, they have even found carols written in those distant past days which are similar to the ones sung today. In ancient times the word for carols was Eiresioni , and children of that era held an effigy of a ship which depicted the arrival of the god Dionysos. Other times they held an olive or laurel branch decorated with red and white threads, on which they would tie the offerings of the homeowners.

This Eiresioni song from the Homeric period can still be heard today - with small changes - in the carols of Thrace:

In this house we came of the rich-landlord
May its doors open for the wealth to roll in
The wealth and happiness and desired peace should enter
And may its clay jugs fill with honey, wine and oil
And the kneading tub with rising dough.

Following are the Greek carols for each of the three holidays: Christmas Carols, New Year Carols and Epiphany Carols.

GREEK CHRISTMAS CAROLS

Good day lords
If it's your bidding
Of the Christ's divine birth
I will tell in your manse

Christ is being born today
In the town of Bethlehem
The heavens rejoice
And all creation delights

In the cave he is born
Within the horse manger
The king of the heavens
And Maker of all . . .

GREEK NEW YEAR CAROLS

First of the month and first of the year
My tall rosemary
Let our good year begin
Church with the holy throne

It is the beginning when Christ
Holy and spiritual
Will walk on earth
And cheer us up

St. Basil is on his way
And will not deign on us
From Kesaria
You're a Lady milady

GREEK EPIPHANY CAROLS

Today is the lights and the enlightment
The happiness is big and the sanctification

Down the Jordan River
Sits our Lady the Blessed Virgin Mary

She carries an organ, a candle she holds
And pleads with St. John.

St. John lord and Baptist
Baptize this divine child of mine

I shall ascend to the heavens
To gather roses and incense

Good day, good day
Good day to you master and the missus.

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by George Poulos on 04.01.2014

Nativity scene in the main platteia at Potamos

Potamos is very attractively laid out, with lights and Xmas and New Year's decorations everywhere.

A loudspeaker at Strati's (the bandmaster) shop is playing Xmas carols, on an endless loop.

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Evita Provataris on 28.04.2009

Ilariotissa Giorti - April 24, 2009

Procession of the icon of Myrtidiotissa across the bridge in Potamos in celebration of the Giorti of Ilariotissa

Photographer:
Evita Provataris, granddaugher of Emmanuel Sofios

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Evita Provataris on 28.04.2009

Good Friday - Illariotisa Church Potamos

April 17, 2009

Photographer:
Evita Provataris, granddaughter of Emmanuel Sofios

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Evita Provataris on 28.04.2009

Christ on the Cross - Ilariotissa Church - Holy Week 2009

April 2009

photographer:
Evita Provataris, granddaughter of Emmanuel Sofios

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Evita Provataris on 28.04.2009

Ilariotissa Church in Potamos - Holy Saturday, 2009

Holy Saturday services outside the church of Ilariotissa in Potamos - April 19, 2009

Photographer:
Evita Provataris, granddaughter of Emmanuel Sofios

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by George Poulos on 01.12.2007

Letter of thanks and appreciation from the Aged Persons Home,

Potamos, Kythera, to, George and Lorraine Poulos, Dover Heights, Australia.

Similar letters were also sent to Ms Linda Brennan, Matina & Manuel Samios, Dr Mitchell Notaras, Peter & Helen Mageros & family, The Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust, and the Protopsaltis brothers, Makras, George, Michael & John.

The letters were sent in response to receiving a container load of Hospital Equipment from Australia.

Do not ask what Kythera can do for you,
Or even, what Kythera can do for itself...
Ask instead,
What you can do for Kythera...


In the week beginning Monday the 17th September a large 20 foot (7 metre) container (the standard shipping variety) was unloaded on Kythera.

Inside was about $A80,000 (at new prices) of hospital equipment destined for use at the Aged Persons Home, Potamos. The equipment included a number of sophisticated "multi-part-moving" beds, of a variety rarely (if ever) seen on Kythera.

The Project to despatch the equipment had been a joint venture between a number of diaspora Kytherians, and a committed "Aussie" philo-Kytherian:

...George & Lorraine Poulos. (Lorraine was then Director of Aged Services at St. Lukes Hospital, Potts Point. She is now Chief Operations Officer, the Aged Care Television Channel, Australia-wide.)

...Ms Linda Brennan, St. Luke's Care, who co-ordinated the logistics, and arranged to have the equipment delivered to the Frutex factory.

...Matina & Manuel Samios, Bronte & Mitata, true Kytherians & philo-Kytherians.

...Dr Mitchell Notaras, London, who came to Australia, examined the equipment, and determined what type was most needed, and most useful for Kythera.

...Peter & Helen Mageros, & family, benefactors-extrordinaire for Kythera, who picked up the equipment from various locations, stored the goods & packed the container. The family also funded the US$6,500 to ship the container to Athens.

The Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust, who donated $A2,880, for Customs Duty & Port Charges (Athens), and

...the Protopsaltis family, George, Michael & John; Makras, Kythera, who funded the 1000 euro cost to ship the container from Athens to Kythera.

It is hoped that this visionary initiative might serve as a template for similar projects. Books, (first and second hand), musical instruments, & fire fighting equipment for example, could easily be despatched from Australia or America in the same way.

In the meantime is is hoped that the Hospital equipment that has arrived will provide a tangible benefit for the persons in the Aged Persons Home, for years, perhaps decades, to come?

The group involved in despatching the container also hope that it will provide a "psychological" uplift to the Board, Administrators, Nurses, carers, volunteers, and "friends" of the Aged Persons Home, Potamos, Kythera.

To view/download Congratulations Letter from the Oikos Eiyirias Kythiron, "Kasimateion", (Gerokomeion) - Aged Persons Home, Potamos, as a .pdf:

KasimateionCongratLetter.pdf

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by KCA Admin on 29.03.2007

Stratis Theodorakakis' 80th birthday celebration

Celebrating the 80th birthday of maestro Stratis Theodorokakis. 24 March 2007, Potamos. Photo by Kosmas Megalokonomos.

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by John Stathatos on 19.12.2006

Christmas caroling in Potamos

The Kythera Philharmonic Society choir under the direction of Stratis Theodorakakis singing Cristmas carols in the main square of Potamos, Sunday December 17.

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by John Stathatos on 19.12.2006

Christmas caroling in Potamos

The Kythera Philharmonic Society choir under the direction of Stratis Theodorakakis singing Cristmas carols in the main square of Potamos, Sunday December 17.

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 23.11.2006

Discover Your Roots Day - August 12, 2006

Professor Basile Leftheris translates the Greek to English as Viron Dapontes speaks about six sources of information to research Kytherian roots at the Discover Your Roots Day at the Chora town hall.

See also:

Discover Your Roots 2006

Viron Dapontes and the handgrenade

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 19.10.2006

'' opah''

dancing on tables at this years dance at potamos on the 15th august.

Photos > Island Social Life

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 17.10.2006

''aussie corner''

australize meet at the platia at potamos on sunday