kythera family kythera family
  

Island Churches & Icons / Potamos

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

Showing 1 - 20 from 57 entries
Show: sorted by:

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 22.03.2016

agios jannis

lovely little church on the main road near the turn off for agios theodoros , just past potamo

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 09.09.2015

please sir .. may i have some more?

a lovely afternoon tea follows a esperino service at ajios jannis sta saneetha potamos , even the priest would like a cake and a coffee ..!

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 06.09.2015

a little ray of sunshine !

lovely late afternoon church service at agios jannis ... sta saneetha potamo , for john the Baptist saint day ...

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 12.01.2015

come unto me !!

father petros mariatos of elaryourtasa church in potamo delievers holy commune at the sunday church service...the little girl at the end of the line is saying her own little prayer !!

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 11.01.2015

epiphany / theophany church service laryourtisa potamos ... my 1000 photo entry !

this photo entry will be the 1000 photo of kythera I have entered on kythera family website since its beginnings ... I would like to thank the administrators of this website for the entering of photos ,stories and all information about the island from all kytherians in kythera and in other countries ...I would like to dedicate this entry to all the generations of the departure from the island the many 1000s of people that left the island to seek better lives and opportunities abroad , some never to return and others that returned to visit love ones many years later ,also I want to acknowledge the sorrow and pain that parents must of had when farewelling their children or family members at agia pelagia or at the drop of site at the now tree of sorrow site just outside of potamos ... also I would like to dedicate this photo to my father Theodore Trifyllis of trifyllianika , who left in the 30s aged only 14 , to come to Australia .. he told me that he was still waving goodbye to his parents till the island disappeared out of sight when the boat was turning past kavo mailo ...the stories of his time in kythera made me fall in love with the island , and this website allows us to pass on our stories and photos for all generations past and new to get to know kythera and to see what's happening on the island ... thank you to you all , I look forward to my next 1000 photos .... in this photo father mariatos at laryourtisa church in potamo for the 6th January epiphany service

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 18.05.2014

a must stop !

one of the stops of the sacred icon is the old peoples home at potamo just after Easter ..

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 17.05.2014

'' right of way ''

the icon is bought up from agia pelagia to potamo as part of the village tour at Easter ....

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 14.05.2014

agios theodoros...

the splendid byzantine architecture of agios theodoros , view from the back of the monastery ,near the new hospital , recently the agios theodors panayiri was held on the 12 th may ... xpona polla ...

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 09.05.2014

good friday service at potamo

the epitapho sits inside ellaryoutsa church in potamo at this years easter celebrations on a chilly april evening ..

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 09.05.2014

potamo eptitapho

the epitapho moves through the the streets of potamos

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 13.01.2014

Large congregation present

During the Paramony ceremony of Epithany, the evening of the 5th January, 2014.

Lining up to receive holy communion.

For the meaning of Paramony and Epithany, read below.

Epiphany (Koine Greek: ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, "manifestation", "striking appearance") or Theophany (Ancient Greek (ἡ) Θεοφάνεια, Τheophaneia meaning "vision of God"), which traditionally falls on January 6, is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God the Son as a human being in Jesus Christ. Western Christians commemorate principally (but not solely) the visit of the Magi to the Baby Jesus, and thus Jesus' physical manifestation to the Gentiles. Eastern Christians commemorate the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River, seen as his manifestation to the world as the Son of God.

History

The observance had its origins in the Eastern Christian Churches and was a general celebration of the manifestation of the Incarnation of Jesus Christ. It included the commemoration of his birth; the visit of the Magi to Bethlehem; all of Jesus' childhood events, up to and including his baptism in the Jordan by John the Baptist; and even the miracle at the wedding at Cana in Galilee.It seems fairly clear that the Baptism was the primary event being commemorated.

Adoration of the Magi by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 17th century (Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio.
Christians fixed the date of the feast on January 6 quite early in their history. Ancient liturgies noted Illuminatio, Manifestatio, Declaratio (Illumination, Manifestation, Declaration); cf. Matthew 3:13–17; Luke 3:22; and John 2:1–11; where the Baptism and the Marriage at Cana were dwelt upon. Western Christians have traditionally emphasized the "Revelation to the Gentiles" mentioned in Luke, where the term Gentile means all non-Jewish peoples. The Biblical Magi, who represented the non-Jewish peoples of the world, paid homage to the infant Jesus in stark contrast to Herod the Great (King of Judea), who sought to kill him.[17] In this event, Christian writers also inferred a revelation to the Children of Israel. Saint John Chrysostom identified the significance of the meeting between the Magi and Herod's court: "The star had been hidden from them so that, on finding themselves without their guide, they would have no alternative but to consult the Jews. In this way the birth of Jesus would be made known to all."

The earliest reference to Epiphany as a Christian feast was in A.D. 361, by Ammianus Marcellinus St. Epiphanius says that January 6 is hemera genethlion toutestin epiphanion (Christ's "Birthday; that is, His Epiphany"). He also asserts that the Miracle at Cana occurred on the same calendar day.

In 385, the pilgrim Egeria (also known as Silvia) described a celebration in Jerusalem and Bethlehem, which she called "Epiphany" (epiphania) that commemorated the Nativity of Christ. Even at this early date, there was an octave associated with the feast.

In a sermon delivered on 25 December 380, St. Gregory of Nazianzus referred to the day as ta theophania ("the Theophany", an alternative name for Epiphany), saying expressly that it is a day commemorating he hagia tou Christou gennesis ("the holy nativity of Christ") and told his listeners that they would soon be celebrating the baptism of Christ. Then, on January 6 and 7, he preached two more sermons, wherein he declared that the celebration of the birth of Christ and the visitation of the Magi had already taken place, and that they would now commemorate his Baptism. At this time, celebration of the two events was beginning to be observed on separate occasions, at least in Cappadocia.
Saint John Cassian says that even in his time (beginning of the 5th century), the Egyptian monasteries celebrated the Nativity and Baptism together on January 6.The Armenian Apostolic Church continues to celebrate January 6 as the only commemoration of the Nativity.

Etymology and original word usage

The Koine Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia derives from the verb "to appear" and means "manifestation," "appearance." In classical Greek it was used of the appearance of dawn, of an enemy in war, but especially of a manifestation of a deity to a worshipper (a theophany). In the Septuagint the word is used for a manifestation of the God of Israel (2 Maccabees 15:27). In the New Testament the word is used in 2 Timothy 1:10 to refer either to the birth of Christ or to his appearance after his resurrection, and five times to refer to the Second Coming.

Liturgical practice in Eastern Orthodox churches

Forefeast: The liturgical Forefeast of Theophany begins on January 1, and concludes with the Paramony on January 5.

Paramony: The Eve of the Feast is called Paramony (Greek: παραμονή, Slavonic: navechérie). Paramony is observed as a strict fast day, on which those faithful who are physically able, refrain from food until the first star is observed in the evening, when a meal with wine and oil may be taken. On this day the Royal Hours are celebrated, thus tying together the feasts of Nativity and Good Friday. The Royal Hours are followed by the Divine Liturgy of St. Basil which combines Vespers with the Divine Liturgy. During the Vespers, fifteen Old Testament lections which foreshadow the Baptism of Christ are read, and special antiphons are chanted. If the Feast of the Theophany falls on a Sunday or Monday, the Royal Hours are chanted on the previous Friday, and on the Paramony the Vesperal Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom is celebrated and the fasting is lessened to some degree.

Theophany Crucession. The priests throw a wooden cross in the Yantra river. Believers will then jump into the icy waters to "save" the cross.

Blessing of Waters: The Orthodox Churches perform the Great Blessing of Waters on Theophany.[42] The blessing is normally done twice: once on the Eve of the Feast—usually at a Baptismal font inside the church—and then again on the day of the feast, outdoors at a body of water. Following the Divine Liturgy, the clergy and people go in a Crucession (procession with the cross) to the nearest body of water, be it a beach, harbor, quay, river, lake, swimming pool, water depot, etc. (ideally, it should be a body of "living water"). At the end of the ceremony the priest will bless the waters. In the Greek practice, he does this by casting a cross into the water. If swimming is feasible on the spot, any number of volunteers may try to recover the cross. The person who gets the cross first swims back and returns it to the priest, who then delivers a special blessing to the swimmer and their household. Certain such ceremonies have achieved particular prominence, such as the one held annually at Tarpon Springs, Florida. In Russia, where the winters are severe, a hole will be cut into the ice so that the waters may be blessed. In such conditions, the cross is not cast into the water, but is held securely by the priest and dipped three times into the water.

The water that is blessed on this day is known as "Theophany Water" and is taken home by the faithful, and used with prayer as a blessing. People will not only bless themselves and their homes by sprinkling with Theophany Water, but will also drink it. The Orthodox Church teaches that Theophany Water differs from regular holy water in that with Theophany Water, the very nature of the water is changed and becomes incorrupt,[43] a miracle attested to as early as St. John Chrysostom.[44]

Theophany is a traditional day for performing Baptisms, and this is reflected in the Divine Liturgy by singing the baptismal hymn, "As many as have been baptized into Christ, have put on Christ. Alleluia," in place of the Trisagion.

House Blessings: On Theophany the priest will begin making the round of the parishioner's homes to bless them. He will perform a short prayer service in each home, and then go through the entire house, gardens and outside-buildings, blessing them with the newly blessed Theophany Water, while all sing the Troparion and Kontakion of the feast. This is normally done on Theophany, or at least during the Afterfeast, but if the parishioners are numerous, and especially if many live far away from the church, it may take some time to bless each house. Traditionally, these blessings should all be finished before the beginning of Great Lent).

Afterfeast: The Feast of Theophany is followed by an eight-day Afterfeast on which the normal fasting laws are suspended. The Saturday and Sunday after Theophany have special readings assigned to them, which relate to the Temptation of Christ and to penance and perseverance in the Christian struggle. There is thus a liturgical continuum between the Feast of Theophany and the beginning of Great Lent.

The explanation of Epithany is from Wikipedia. The Wikipedia entry is much more extensive.

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 13.01.2014

Second altar amongst the congregation

During the Paramony ceremony of Epithany, the evening of the 5th January, 2014.

For the meaning of Paramony read below.

Epiphany (Koine Greek: ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, "manifestation", "striking appearance") or Theophany (Ancient Greek (ἡ) Θεοφάνεια, Τheophaneia meaning "vision of God"), which traditionally falls on January 6, is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God the Son as a human being in Jesus Christ. Western Christians commemorate principally (but not solely) the visit of the Magi to the Baby Jesus, and thus Jesus' physical manifestation to the Gentiles. Eastern Christians commemorate the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River, seen as his manifestation to the world as the Son of God.

History

The observance had its origins in the Eastern Christian Churches and was a general celebration of the manifestation of the Incarnation of Jesus Christ. It included the commemoration of his birth; the visit of the Magi to Bethlehem; all of Jesus' childhood events, up to and including his baptism in the Jordan by John the Baptist; and even the miracle at the wedding at Cana in Galilee.It seems fairly clear that the Baptism was the primary event being commemorated.

Adoration of the Magi by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 17th century (Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio.
Christians fixed the date of the feast on January 6 quite early in their history. Ancient liturgies noted Illuminatio, Manifestatio, Declaratio (Illumination, Manifestation, Declaration); cf. Matthew 3:13–17; Luke 3:22; and John 2:1–11; where the Baptism and the Marriage at Cana were dwelt upon. Western Christians have traditionally emphasized the "Revelation to the Gentiles" mentioned in Luke, where the term Gentile means all non-Jewish peoples. The Biblical Magi, who represented the non-Jewish peoples of the world, paid homage to the infant Jesus in stark contrast to Herod the Great (King of Judea), who sought to kill him.[17] In this event, Christian writers also inferred a revelation to the Children of Israel. Saint John Chrysostom identified the significance of the meeting between the Magi and Herod's court: "The star had been hidden from them so that, on finding themselves without their guide, they would have no alternative but to consult the Jews. In this way the birth of Jesus would be made known to all."

The earliest reference to Epiphany as a Christian feast was in A.D. 361, by Ammianus Marcellinus St. Epiphanius says that January 6 is hemera genethlion toutestin epiphanion (Christ's "Birthday; that is, His Epiphany"). He also asserts that the Miracle at Cana occurred on the same calendar day.

In 385, the pilgrim Egeria (also known as Silvia) described a celebration in Jerusalem and Bethlehem, which she called "Epiphany" (epiphania) that commemorated the Nativity of Christ. Even at this early date, there was an octave associated with the feast.

In a sermon delivered on 25 December 380, St. Gregory of Nazianzus referred to the day as ta theophania ("the Theophany", an alternative name for Epiphany), saying expressly that it is a day commemorating he hagia tou Christou gennesis ("the holy nativity of Christ") and told his listeners that they would soon be celebrating the baptism of Christ. Then, on January 6 and 7, he preached two more sermons, wherein he declared that the celebration of the birth of Christ and the visitation of the Magi had already taken place, and that they would now commemorate his Baptism. At this time, celebration of the two events was beginning to be observed on separate occasions, at least in Cappadocia.
Saint John Cassian says that even in his time (beginning of the 5th century), the Egyptian monasteries celebrated the Nativity and Baptism together on January 6.The Armenian Apostolic Church continues to celebrate January 6 as the only commemoration of the Nativity.

Etymology and original word usage

The Koine Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia derives from the verb "to appear" and means "manifestation," "appearance." In classical Greek it was used of the appearance of dawn, of an enemy in war, but especially of a manifestation of a deity to a worshipper (a theophany). In the Septuagint the word is used for a manifestation of the God of Israel (2 Maccabees 15:27). In the New Testament the word is used in 2 Timothy 1:10 to refer either to the birth of Christ or to his appearance after his resurrection, and five times to refer to the Second Coming.

Liturgical practice in Eastern Orthodox churches

Forefeast: The liturgical Forefeast of Theophany begins on January 1, and concludes with the Paramony on January 5.

Paramony: The Eve of the Feast is called Paramony (Greek: παραμονή, Slavonic: navechérie). Paramony is observed as a strict fast day, on which those faithful who are physically able, refrain from food until the first star is observed in the evening, when a meal with wine and oil may be taken. On this day the Royal Hours are celebrated, thus tying together the feasts of Nativity and Good Friday. The Royal Hours are followed by the Divine Liturgy of St. Basil which combines Vespers with the Divine Liturgy. During the Vespers, fifteen Old Testament lections which foreshadow the Baptism of Christ are read, and special antiphons are chanted. If the Feast of the Theophany falls on a Sunday or Monday, the Royal Hours are chanted on the previous Friday, and on the Paramony the Vesperal Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom is celebrated and the fasting is lessened to some degree.

Theophany Crucession. The priests throw a wooden cross in the Yantra river. Believers will then jump into the icy waters to "save" the cross.

Blessing of Waters: The Orthodox Churches perform the Great Blessing of Waters on Theophany.[42] The blessing is normally done twice: once on the Eve of the Feast—usually at a Baptismal font inside the church—and then again on the day of the feast, outdoors at a body of water. Following the Divine Liturgy, the clergy and people go in a Crucession (procession with the cross) to the nearest body of water, be it a beach, harbor, quay, river, lake, swimming pool, water depot, etc. (ideally, it should be a body of "living water"). At the end of the ceremony the priest will bless the waters. In the Greek practice, he does this by casting a cross into the water. If swimming is feasible on the spot, any number of volunteers may try to recover the cross. The person who gets the cross first swims back and returns it to the priest, who then delivers a special blessing to the swimmer and their household. Certain such ceremonies have achieved particular prominence, such as the one held annually at Tarpon Springs, Florida. In Russia, where the winters are severe, a hole will be cut into the ice so that the waters may be blessed. In such conditions, the cross is not cast into the water, but is held securely by the priest and dipped three times into the water.

The water that is blessed on this day is known as "Theophany Water" and is taken home by the faithful, and used with prayer as a blessing. People will not only bless themselves and their homes by sprinkling with Theophany Water, but will also drink it. The Orthodox Church teaches that Theophany Water differs from regular holy water in that with Theophany Water, the very nature of the water is changed and becomes incorrupt,[43] a miracle attested to as early as St. John Chrysostom.[44]

Theophany is a traditional day for performing Baptisms, and this is reflected in the Divine Liturgy by singing the baptismal hymn, "As many as have been baptized into Christ, have put on Christ. Alleluia," in place of the Trisagion.

House Blessings: On Theophany the priest will begin making the round of the parishioner's homes to bless them. He will perform a short prayer service in each home, and then go through the entire house, gardens and outside-buildings, blessing them with the newly blessed Theophany Water, while all sing the Troparion and Kontakion of the feast. This is normally done on Theophany, or at least during the Afterfeast, but if the parishioners are numerous, and especially if many live far away from the church, it may take some time to bless each house. Traditionally, these blessings should all be finished before the beginning of Great Lent).

Afterfeast: The Feast of Theophany is followed by an eight-day Afterfeast on which the normal fasting laws are suspended. The Saturday and Sunday after Theophany have special readings assigned to them, which relate to the Temptation of Christ and to penance and perseverance in the Christian struggle. There is thus a liturgical continuum between the Feast of Theophany and the beginning of Great Lent.

The explanation of Epithany is from Wikipedia. The Wikipedia entry is much more extensive.

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 11.01.2014

Epithany celebrated on Kythera. Paramony ceremony at Potamos

The positioning of a second alter, surrounded by palm leaves is interesting. Father Petros explained the effect is to set the "alter" down amongst the people, so that the "divine" is much more accessible to all.

For the the meaning of "paramony" - read below.

Epiphany (Koine Greek: ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, "manifestation", "striking appearance") or Theophany (Ancient Greek (ἡ) Θεοφάνεια, Τheophaneia meaning "vision of God"), which traditionally falls on January 6, is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God the Son as a human being in Jesus Christ. Western Christians commemorate principally (but not solely) the visit of the Magi to the Baby Jesus, and thus Jesus' physical manifestation to the Gentiles. Eastern Christians commemorate the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River, seen as his manifestation to the world as the Son of God.

History

The observance had its origins in the Eastern Christian Churches and was a general celebration of the manifestation of the Incarnation of Jesus Christ. It included the commemoration of his birth; the visit of the Magi to Bethlehem; all of Jesus' childhood events, up to and including his baptism in the Jordan by John the Baptist; and even the miracle at the wedding at Cana in Galilee.It seems fairly clear that the Baptism was the primary event being commemorated.

Adoration of the Magi by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 17th century (Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio.
Christians fixed the date of the feast on January 6 quite early in their history. Ancient liturgies noted Illuminatio, Manifestatio, Declaratio (Illumination, Manifestation, Declaration); cf. Matthew 3:13–17; Luke 3:22; and John 2:1–11; where the Baptism and the Marriage at Cana were dwelt upon. Western Christians have traditionally emphasized the "Revelation to the Gentiles" mentioned in Luke, where the term Gentile means all non-Jewish peoples. The Biblical Magi, who represented the non-Jewish peoples of the world, paid homage to the infant Jesus in stark contrast to Herod the Great (King of Judea), who sought to kill him.[17] In this event, Christian writers also inferred a revelation to the Children of Israel. Saint John Chrysostom identified the significance of the meeting between the Magi and Herod's court: "The star had been hidden from them so that, on finding themselves without their guide, they would have no alternative but to consult the Jews. In this way the birth of Jesus would be made known to all."

The earliest reference to Epiphany as a Christian feast was in A.D. 361, by Ammianus Marcellinus St. Epiphanius says that January 6 is hemera genethlion toutestin epiphanion (Christ's "Birthday; that is, His Epiphany"). He also asserts that the Miracle at Cana occurred on the same calendar day.

In 385, the pilgrim Egeria (also known as Silvia) described a celebration in Jerusalem and Bethlehem, which she called "Epiphany" (epiphania) that commemorated the Nativity of Christ. Even at this early date, there was an octave associated with the feast.

In a sermon delivered on 25 December 380, St. Gregory of Nazianzus referred to the day as ta theophania ("the Theophany", an alternative name for Epiphany), saying expressly that it is a day commemorating he hagia tou Christou gennesis ("the holy nativity of Christ") and told his listeners that they would soon be celebrating the baptism of Christ. Then, on January 6 and 7, he preached two more sermons, wherein he declared that the celebration of the birth of Christ and the visitation of the Magi had already taken place, and that they would now commemorate his Baptism. At this time, celebration of the two events was beginning to be observed on separate occasions, at least in Cappadocia.
Saint John Cassian says that even in his time (beginning of the 5th century), the Egyptian monasteries celebrated the Nativity and Baptism together on January 6.The Armenian Apostolic Church continues to celebrate January 6 as the only commemoration of the Nativity.

Etymology and original word usage

The Koine Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia derives from the verb "to appear" and means "manifestation," "appearance." In classical Greek it was used of the appearance of dawn, of an enemy in war, but especially of a manifestation of a deity to a worshipper (a theophany). In the Septuagint the word is used for a manifestation of the God of Israel (2 Maccabees 15:27). In the New Testament the word is used in 2 Timothy 1:10 to refer either to the birth of Christ or to his appearance after his resurrection, and five times to refer to the Second Coming.

Liturgical practice in Eastern Orthodox churches

Forefeast: The liturgical Forefeast of Theophany begins on January 1, and concludes with the Paramony on January 5.

Paramony: The Eve of the Feast is called Paramony (Greek: παραμονή, Slavonic: navechérie). Paramony is observed as a strict fast day, on which those faithful who are physically able, refrain from food until the first star is observed in the evening, when a meal with wine and oil may be taken. On this day the Royal Hours are celebrated, thus tying together the feasts of Nativity and Good Friday. The Royal Hours are followed by the Divine Liturgy of St. Basil which combines Vespers with the Divine Liturgy. During the Vespers, fifteen Old Testament lections which foreshadow the Baptism of Christ are read, and special antiphons are chanted. If the Feast of the Theophany falls on a Sunday or Monday, the Royal Hours are chanted on the previous Friday, and on the Paramony the Vesperal Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom is celebrated and the fasting is lessened to some degree.

Theophany Crucession. The priests throw a wooden cross in the Yantra river. Believers will then jump into the icy waters to "save" the cross.

Blessing of Waters: The Orthodox Churches perform the Great Blessing of Waters on Theophany.[42] The blessing is normally done twice: once on the Eve of the Feast—usually at a Baptismal font inside the church—and then again on the day of the feast, outdoors at a body of water. Following the Divine Liturgy, the clergy and people go in a Crucession (procession with the cross) to the nearest body of water, be it a beach, harbor, quay, river, lake, swimming pool, water depot, etc. (ideally, it should be a body of "living water"). At the end of the ceremony the priest will bless the waters. In the Greek practice, he does this by casting a cross into the water. If swimming is feasible on the spot, any number of volunteers may try to recover the cross. The person who gets the cross first swims back and returns it to the priest, who then delivers a special blessing to the swimmer and their household. Certain such ceremonies have achieved particular prominence, such as the one held annually at Tarpon Springs, Florida. In Russia, where the winters are severe, a hole will be cut into the ice so that the waters may be blessed. In such conditions, the cross is not cast into the water, but is held securely by the priest and dipped three times into the water.

The water that is blessed on this day is known as "Theophany Water" and is taken home by the faithful, and used with prayer as a blessing. People will not only bless themselves and their homes by sprinkling with Theophany Water, but will also drink it. The Orthodox Church teaches that Theophany Water differs from regular holy water in that with Theophany Water, the very nature of the water is changed and becomes incorrupt,[43] a miracle attested to as early as St. John Chrysostom.[44]

Theophany is a traditional day for performing Baptisms, and this is reflected in the Divine Liturgy by singing the baptismal hymn, "As many as have been baptized into Christ, have put on Christ. Alleluia," in place of the Trisagion.

House Blessings: On Theophany the priest will begin making the round of the parishioner's homes to bless them. He will perform a short prayer service in each home, and then go through the entire house, gardens and outside-buildings, blessing them with the newly blessed Theophany Water, while all sing the Troparion and Kontakion of the feast. This is normally done on Theophany, or at least during the Afterfeast, but if the parishioners are numerous, and especially if many live far away from the church, it may take some time to bless each house. Traditionally, these blessings should all be finished before the beginning of Great Lent).

Afterfeast: The Feast of Theophany is followed by an eight-day Afterfeast on which the normal fasting laws are suspended. The Saturday and Sunday after Theophany have special readings assigned to them, which relate to the Temptation of Christ and to penance and perseverance in the Christian struggle. There is thus a liturgical continuum between the Feast of Theophany and the beginning of Great Lent.

The explanation of Epithany is from Wikipedia. The Wikipedia entry is much more extensive.

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 02.07.2013

'' WHEN THE MOON HITS YOUR EYES''

is there a more lovely sight in kythera than a full moon in august ? the moon at its brilliant moment over illaroitissa church in potamo .. cant wait to see the full moon in august this summer ...to light up the beauty of the island at night ...

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 17.05.2013

The Metropoliti addressing the large crowd that attended

....the feast day of Ayios Theothoros, 2013

At the Monastery of Ayios Theothoros, Kythera

The Ayios Theothoros Feast Day, is commemorated on May 12th

Historical sketch

The monastery of Saint Theodoros was built by craftsmen from Monemvasia at the place where a smaller one previously existed and where Saint Theodoros had lived like a hermit the 10th century. The Saint was born in Koroni and came to Kythera when the island was deserted. For this reason he is perceived by the Kytherians to be the one who brought life to the island. Saint Theodoros died on the 12th of May 961 A.C. and his body was found intact three years later.

From Ioannis Mavromatis

The Kytherians celebrated with faith and splendor today, 12 May 2013, Agios Theodoros name day. It is important that the Holy icon of Panagia Myrtidiotissa was also there. That happens about every 30 years, because of the late this year Pasha date.

A special guest invited by Metropolitan Serafim was the Metropolitan of East Attica, Nikolaos, a well known and wise person, who was the key speaker and blessed the people. The Philarmonic Orchestra of Potamos directed by Stratis Theodorakakis-Tsabiras added pomp and pulse.

Some 50 pilgrims from Koroni, Ag. Theodoros birth place attended as every year, as well.

With the melodic and harmonic psalms of the Kytherian Chorus directed by George Lourandos-Pieros, every one had a real celebration.

With the blessing of Agios Theodoros to all of you, XRONIA POLLA.

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 17.05.2013

Strati and the Kytherian Band at

The Celebration of the feast day of Ayios Theothoros, 2103

At the Monastery of Ayios Theothoros, Kythera

The Ayios Theothoros Feast Day, is commemorated on May 12th

Historical sketch

The monastery of Saint Theodoros was built by craftsmen from Monemvasia at the place where a smaller one previously existed and where Saint Theodoros had lived like a hermit the 10th century. The Saint was born in Koroni and came to Kythera when the island was deserted. For this reason he is perceived by the Kytherians to be the one who brought life to the island. Saint Theodoros died on the 12th of May 961 A.C. and his body was found intact three years later.

From Ioannis Mavromatis

The Kytherians celebrated with faith and splendor today, 12 May 2013, Agios Theodoros name day. It is important that the Holy icon of Panagia Myrtidiotissa was also there. That happens about every 30 years, because of the late this year Pasha date.

A special guest invited by Metropolitan Serafim was the Metropolitan of East Attica, Nikolaos, a well known and wise person, who was the key speaker and blessed the people. The Philarmonic Orchestra of Potamos directed by Stratis Theodorakakis-Tsabiras added pomp and pulse.

Some 50 pilgrims from Koroni, Ag. Theodoros birth place attended as every year, as well.

With the melodic and harmonic psalms of the Kytherian Chorus directed by George Lourandos-Pieros, every one had a real celebration.

With the blessing of Agios Theodoros to all of you, XRONIA POLLA.

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 17.05.2013

Exterior of the Church in the Monastery of Ayios Theothoros

Celebration of the Feast Day of Ayios Theothoros, 2013

At the Monastery of Ayios Theothoros, Kythera

The Ayios Theothoros Feast Day, is commemorated on May 12th

Historical sketch

The monastery of Saint Theodoros was built by craftsmen from Monemvasia at the place where a smaller one previously existed and where Saint Theodoros had lived like a hermit the 10th century. The Saint was born in Koroni and came to Kythera when the island was deserted. For this reason he is perceived by the Kytherians to be the one who brought life to the island. Saint Theodoros died on the 12th of May 961 A.C. and his body was found intact three years later.

From Ioannis Mavromatis

The Kytherians celebrated with faith and splendor today, 12 May 2013, Agios Theodoros name day. It is important that the Holy icon of Panagia Myrtidiotissa was also there. That happens about every 30 years, because of the late this year Pasha date.

A special guest invited by Metropolitan Serafim was the Metropolitan of East Attica, Nikolaos, a well known and wise person, who was the key speaker and blessed the people. The Philarmonic Orchestra of Potamos directed by Stratis Theodorakakis-Tsabiras added pomp and pulse.

Some 50 pilgrims from Koroni, Ag. Theodoros birth place attended as every year, as well.

With the melodic and harmonic psalms of the Kytherian Chorus directed by George Lourandos-Pieros, every one had a real celebration.

With the blessing of Agios Theodoros to all of you, XRONIA POLLA.

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 17.05.2013

Icons on display during the ............

..........celebration of the Feast Day of Ayios Theothoros

At the Monastery of Ayios Theothoros, Kythera

The Ayios Theothoros Feast Day, is commemorated on May 12th

Historical sketch

The monastery of Saint Theodoros was built by craftsmen from Monemvasia at the place where a smaller one previously existed and where Saint Theodoros had lived like a hermit the 10th century. The Saint was born in Koroni and came to Kythera when the island was deserted. For this reason he is perceived by the Kytherians to be the one who brought life to the island. Saint Theodoros died on the 12th of May 961 A.C. and his body was found intact three years later.

From Ioannis Mavromatis

The Kytherians celebrated with faith and splendor today, 12 May 2013, Agios Theodoros name day. It is important that the Holy icon of Panagia Myrtidiotissa was also there. That happens about every 30 years, because of the late this year Pasha date.

A special guest invited by Metropolitan Serafim was the Metropolitan of East Attica, Nikolaos, a well known and wise person, who was the key speaker and blessed the people. The Philarmonic Orchestra of Potamos directed by Stratis Theodorakakis-Tsabiras added pomp and pulse.

Some 50 pilgrims from Koroni, Ag. Theodoros birth place attended as every year, as well.

With the melodic and harmonic psalms of the Kytherian Chorus directed by George Lourandos-Pieros, every one had a real celebration.

With the blessing of Agios Theodoros to all of you, XRONIA POLLA.

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 17.05.2013

Celebration of the Feast Day of Ayios Theothoros

At the Monastery of Ayios Theothoros, Kythera

The Ayios Theothoros Feast Day, is commemorated on May 12th

Historical sketch

The monastery of Saint Theodoros was built by craftsmen from Monemvasia at the place where a smaller one previously existed and where Saint Theodoros had lived like a hermit the 10th century. The Saint was born in Koroni and came to Kythera when the island was deserted. For this reason he is perceived by the Kytherians to be the one who brought life to the island. Saint Theodoros died on the 12th of May 961 A.C. and his body was found intact three years later.

From Ioannis Mavromatis

The Kytherians celebrated with faith and splendor today, 12 May 2013, Agios Theodoros name day. It is important that the Holy icon of Panagia Myrtidiotissa was also there. That happens about every 30 years, because of the late this year Pasha date.

A special guest invited by Metropolitan Serafim was the Metropolitan of East Attica, Nikolaos, a well known and wise person, who was the key speaker and blessed the people. The Philarmonic Orchestra of Potamos directed by Stratis Theodorakakis-Tsabiras added pomp and pulse.

Some 50 pilgrims from Koroni, Ag. Theodoros birth place attended as every year, as well.

With the melodic and harmonic psalms of the Kytherian Chorus directed by George Lourandos-Pieros, every one had a real celebration.

With the blessing of Agios Theodoros to all of you, XRONIA POLLA.

Photos > Island Churches & Icons

submitted by Gaye Hegeman on 09.06.2010

Agios Spiridon, Potamos

Very old church, Agios Spiridon, Potomos - unknown age.