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submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 25.11.2015

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Riccardo Burchielli

Vertigo for the DC Fan: Mark Sexton Introduces the Mad Max: Fury Road Comic

By Mark Sexton

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015


Mark Sexton worked as storyboard artist and concept artist on Mad Max: Fury Road. He is also the co-writer, along with George Miller and Nico Lathouris, and co-artist of the Mad Max: Fury Road comic series.

Comics now available include:

The debut issue, Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe E #1
Mad Max: Fury Road: Furiosa
Mad Max: Fury Road: Max
Mad Max: Fury Road: Compilation Book
. (3 comics above, collected). All published by Vertigo, a division of DC Comics.

Other books available:

The Art of Mad Max: Fury Road, by Abbie Bernstein
ISBN: 9781783298167
Format: Hardback Publisher: Titan Books Limited

Mad Max: Fury Road – Inspired Artists Artbook. Deluxe Edition.
Various graphic artists. Commentary by George Miller and the artists
Publisher: Vertigo; Deluxe edition (May 12, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1401259030
ISBN-13: 978-1401259037

Mad Max: Fury Road is an amazing film, but as writer and concept artist Mark Sexton makes clear, the movie's only part of the story. For the rest, you'll have to head to the comic shop.

Cover art for Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe, by Tommy Lee Edwards

Cover art by Tommy Lee Edwards

Back in the dim, distant past—well, late 1982—I was a guest at a twelve-year old birthday party in a small flat somewhere in Adelaide (yes, I was twelve too, I’m not that old).

Sugared-up and full of red cordial, we bounced off the walls and each other, generally causing chaos but not too much property damage. The flat was a nice one, and under the television it sported a VCR (remember those?) and a small library of video cassettes in their clunky black plastic covers. In the midst of the hyperglycemic activity, one brave kid found a title with "R-rated” splashed across the spine, and in a thrill of illicit excitement, he stuck it in the VCR and pressed play.
It was Mad Max 2. You folks in the US of A know it as The Road Warrior.
And when the sound of that shrieking blower filled the air, and the camera pulled out of the darkness to begin 90 minutes of nitro-fuelled violence and nihilism, every single kid sat down in front of the television and didn’t move until the credits rolled. God knows where the adults were...
Suffice to say, I’d never seen anything like it. I was hooked.

Interior art by Mark Sexton for Nux and Immortan Joe. Mad Max: Fury Road

Interior art by Mark Sexton

Fast forward seventeen years—1999. I was in my third year of a career as a storyboard artist working in Sydney. I got a call to come in to the production company of George Miller to talk about a film he wanted to do, something about a dancing penguin… I had heard on the grapevine of dark rumours that something else was happening in the building… That after 24 years, the director of the Mad Max films was secretly working on a sequel. A dancing penguin didn’t seem like quite the same thing, and I figured that it was just that: rumour.
So I went into the magnificent old Art Deco theatre and was directed up to the big room in the centre of the building that George used as his office. I wandered in through the glass doors and stopped dead in my tracks.
On a big electroboard in black ink was a logo. Harsh, jagged, bold and arresting. Four words.
Mad Max: Fury Road.
And art! There was art. Crazy, bonkers stuff. Wild vehicles, combinations of classic cars with airplane tails and shopping trolleys, spiked metal and harpoon cannons, crossbows and carnage. My heart nearly stopped. The rumours were true!

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

I did end up working on the dancing penguin movie, Happy Feet, following the animated adventures of Mumble and spending five years designing the white and blue world of a digital Antarctica. But before that eventuated, I spent two glorious years sitting in that big room with George, co-writer Brendan McCarthy and vehicle designer Peter Pound and we boarded the crap out of a wild, totally insane story that the world is just discovering now.
Peter and Brendan moved on to other jobs and other projects, and at the end of 2001 it was just George and I who finished the boards. Two years! But I wanted to stay in that world…
“George? Have you ever considered doing Mad Max comics?”
George looked thoughtful. “Oh. Let’s see… Hmmm. I’ll think about it.”
Fast forward another thirteen years—2014. Fury Road had achieved the impossible and had actually been shot and was in the throes of post-production. It was thrilling to know the insane project had actually happened, but bittersweet having not had anything more to do with it. Ah, well. Then my phone rang—it was George.
“Hi Mark. About those Mad Max comics? I think it’s a good idea…”
And so these four stories—prequels of some of the key characters of Fury Road—are finally realised. These are not just mere ephemera—not just cynically produced stories that have been hacked out to tie into a summer movie. These are legitimately authentic tales that were dreamed up by George during the production of the film and were told to the actors themselves—tales that gave the characters they played depth and history. The tales of Nux and Immortan Joe. How Furiosa came to meet the Wives. And Max, making his way through the twisted and poisoned wasteland. All stories that flesh out these richly layered and fascinating people, and how they came to be what they are at the beginning of Fury Road.

Stories taken from the mind of George Miller... Given flesh by one of the co-writers of the Fury Road screenplay, Nico Lathouris, and myself. Illustrated and colored with enthusiasm and care by talented artists scattered over the globe. Every detail pored over and considered, altered and beaten into shape by the creators through the prism of years of immersion in the world of Mad Max. Stories that will give those folks who enjoyed the brilliant film a greater appreciation of the world and its history.
These are tales from the Fury Road.
So strap in, flick the kill switches, kick the engine over—and enjoy.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 25.11.2015

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

Vertigo for the DC Fan: Mark Sexton Introduces the Mad Max: Fury Road Comic

By Mark Sexton

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015


Mark Sexton worked as storyboard artist and concept artist on Mad Max: Fury Road. He is also the co-writer, along with George Miller and Nico Lathouris, and co-artist of the Mad Max: Fury Road comic series.

Comics now available include:

The debut issue, Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe E #1
Mad Max: Fury Road: Furiosa
Mad Max: Fury Road: Max
Mad Max: Fury Road: Compilation Book
. (3 comics above, collected). All published by Vertigo, a division of DC Comics.

Other books available:

The Art of Mad Max: Fury Road, by Abbie Bernstein
ISBN: 9781783298167
Format: Hardback Publisher: Titan Books Limited

Mad Max: Fury Road – Inspired Artists Artbook. Deluxe Edition.
Various graphic artists. Commentary by George Miller and the artists
Publisher: Vertigo; Deluxe edition (May 12, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1401259030
ISBN-13: 978-1401259037

Mad Max: Fury Road is an amazing film, but as writer and concept artist Mark Sexton makes clear, the movie's only part of the story. For the rest, you'll have to head to the comic shop.

Cover art for Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe, by Tommy Lee Edwards

Cover art by Tommy Lee Edwards

Back in the dim, distant past—well, late 1982—I was a guest at a twelve-year old birthday party in a small flat somewhere in Adelaide (yes, I was twelve too, I’m not that old).

Sugared-up and full of red cordial, we bounced off the walls and each other, generally causing chaos but not too much property damage. The flat was a nice one, and under the television it sported a VCR (remember those?) and a small library of video cassettes in their clunky black plastic covers. In the midst of the hyperglycemic activity, one brave kid found a title with "R-rated” splashed across the spine, and in a thrill of illicit excitement, he stuck it in the VCR and pressed play.
It was Mad Max 2. You folks in the US of A know it as The Road Warrior.
And when the sound of that shrieking blower filled the air, and the camera pulled out of the darkness to begin 90 minutes of nitro-fuelled violence and nihilism, every single kid sat down in front of the television and didn’t move until the credits rolled. God knows where the adults were...
Suffice to say, I’d never seen anything like it. I was hooked.

Interior art by Mark Sexton for Nux and Immortan Joe. Mad Max: Fury Road

Interior art by Mark Sexton

Fast forward seventeen years—1999. I was in my third year of a career as a storyboard artist working in Sydney. I got a call to come in to the production company of George Miller to talk about a film he wanted to do, something about a dancing penguin… I had heard on the grapevine of dark rumours that something else was happening in the building… That after 24 years, the director of the Mad Max films was secretly working on a sequel. A dancing penguin didn’t seem like quite the same thing, and I figured that it was just that: rumour.
So I went into the magnificent old Art Deco theatre and was directed up to the big room in the centre of the building that George used as his office. I wandered in through the glass doors and stopped dead in my tracks.
On a big electroboard in black ink was a logo. Harsh, jagged, bold and arresting. Four words.
Mad Max: Fury Road.
And art! There was art. Crazy, bonkers stuff. Wild vehicles, combinations of classic cars with airplane tails and shopping trolleys, spiked metal and harpoon cannons, crossbows and carnage. My heart nearly stopped. The rumours were true!

I did end up working on the dancing penguin movie, Happy Feet, following the animated adventures of Mumble and spending five years designing the white and blue world of a digital Antarctica. But before that eventuated, I spent two glorious years sitting in that big room with George, co-writer Brendan McCarthy and vehicle designer Peter Pound and we boarded the crap out of a wild, totally insane story that the world is just discovering now.
Peter and Brendan moved on to other jobs and other projects, and at the end of 2001 it was just George and I who finished the boards. Two years! But I wanted to stay in that world…
“George? Have you ever considered doing Mad Max comics?”
George looked thoughtful. “Oh. Let’s see… Hmmm. I’ll think about it.”
Fast forward another thirteen years—2014. Fury Road had achieved the impossible and had actually been shot and was in the throes of post-production. It was thrilling to know the insane project had actually happened, but bittersweet having not had anything more to do with it. Ah, well. Then my phone rang—it was George.
“Hi Mark. About those Mad Max comics? I think it’s a good idea…”
And so these four stories—prequels of some of the key characters of Fury Road—are finally realised. These are not just mere ephemera—not just cynically produced stories that have been hacked out to tie into a summer movie. These are legitimately authentic tales that were dreamed up by George during the production of the film and were told to the actors themselves—tales that gave the characters they played depth and history. The tales of Nux and Immortan Joe. How Furiosa came to meet the Wives. And Max, making his way through the twisted and poisoned wasteland. All stories that flesh out these richly layered and fascinating people, and how they came to be what they are at the beginning of Fury Road.

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Riccardo Burchielli

Stories taken from the mind of George Miller... Given flesh by one of the co-writers of the Fury Road screenplay, Nico Lathouris, and myself. Illustrated and colored with enthusiasm and care by talented artists scattered over the globe. Every detail pored over and considered, altered and beaten into shape by the creators through the prism of years of immersion in the world of Mad Max. Stories that will give those folks who enjoyed the brilliant film a greater appreciation of the world and its history.
These are tales from the Fury Road.
So strap in, flick the kill switches, kick the engine over—and enjoy.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 25.11.2015

Interior art by Mark Sexton for Nux and Immortan Joe. Mad Max: Fury Road

Vertigo for the DC Fan: Mark Sexton Introduces the Mad Max: Fury Road Comic

By Mark Sexton

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015


Mark Sexton worked as storyboard artist and concept artist on Mad Max: Fury Road. He is also the co-writer, along with George Miller and Nico Lathouris, and co-artist of the Mad Max: Fury Road comic series.

Comics now available include:

The debut issue, Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe E #1
Mad Max: Fury Road: Furiosa
Mad Max: Fury Road: Max
Mad Max: Fury Road: Compilation Book
. (3 comics above, collected). All published by Vertigo, a division of DC Comics.

Other books available:

The Art of Mad Max: Fury Road, by Abbie Bernstein
ISBN: 9781783298167
Format: Hardback Publisher: Titan Books Limited

Mad Max: Fury Road – Inspired Artists Artbook. Deluxe Edition.
Various graphic artists. Commentary by George Miller and the artists
Publisher: Vertigo; Deluxe edition (May 12, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1401259030
ISBN-13: 978-1401259037

Mad Max: Fury Road is an amazing film, but as writer and concept artist Mark Sexton makes clear, the movie's only part of the story. For the rest, you'll have to head to the comic shop.

Cover art for Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe, by Tommy Lee Edwards

Cover art by Tommy Lee Edwards

Back in the dim, distant past—well, late 1982—I was a guest at a twelve-year old birthday party in a small flat somewhere in Adelaide (yes, I was twelve too, I’m not that old).

Sugared-up and full of red cordial, we bounced off the walls and each other, generally causing chaos but not too much property damage. The flat was a nice one, and under the television it sported a VCR (remember those?) and a small library of video cassettes in their clunky black plastic covers. In the midst of the hyperglycemic activity, one brave kid found a title with "R-rated” splashed across the spine, and in a thrill of illicit excitement, he stuck it in the VCR and pressed play.
It was Mad Max 2. You folks in the US of A know it as The Road Warrior.
And when the sound of that shrieking blower filled the air, and the camera pulled out of the darkness to begin 90 minutes of nitro-fuelled violence and nihilism, every single kid sat down in front of the television and didn’t move until the credits rolled. God knows where the adults were...
Suffice to say, I’d never seen anything like it. I was hooked.

Fast forward seventeen years—1999. I was in my third year of a career as a storyboard artist working in Sydney. I got a call to come in to the production company of George Miller to talk about a film he wanted to do, something about a dancing penguin… I had heard on the grapevine of dark rumours that something else was happening in the building… That after 24 years, the director of the Mad Max films was secretly working on a sequel. A dancing penguin didn’t seem like quite the same thing, and I figured that it was just that: rumour.
So I went into the magnificent old Art Deco theatre and was directed up to the big room in the centre of the building that George used as his office. I wandered in through the glass doors and stopped dead in my tracks.
On a big electroboard in black ink was a logo. Harsh, jagged, bold and arresting. Four words.
Mad Max: Fury Road.
And art! There was art. Crazy, bonkers stuff. Wild vehicles, combinations of classic cars with airplane tails and shopping trolleys, spiked metal and harpoon cannons, crossbows and carnage. My heart nearly stopped. The rumours were true!

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

I did end up working on the dancing penguin movie, Happy Feet, following the animated adventures of Mumble and spending five years designing the white and blue world of a digital Antarctica. But before that eventuated, I spent two glorious years sitting in that big room with George, co-writer Brendan McCarthy and vehicle designer Peter Pound and we boarded the crap out of a wild, totally insane story that the world is just discovering now.
Peter and Brendan moved on to other jobs and other projects, and at the end of 2001 it was just George and I who finished the boards. Two years! But I wanted to stay in that world…
“George? Have you ever considered doing Mad Max comics?”
George looked thoughtful. “Oh. Let’s see… Hmmm. I’ll think about it.”
Fast forward another thirteen years—2014. Fury Road had achieved the impossible and had actually been shot and was in the throes of post-production. It was thrilling to know the insane project had actually happened, but bittersweet having not had anything more to do with it. Ah, well. Then my phone rang—it was George.
“Hi Mark. About those Mad Max comics? I think it’s a good idea…”
And so these four stories—prequels of some of the key characters of Fury Road—are finally realised. These are not just mere ephemera—not just cynically produced stories that have been hacked out to tie into a summer movie. These are legitimately authentic tales that were dreamed up by George during the production of the film and were told to the actors themselves—tales that gave the characters they played depth and history. The tales of Nux and Immortan Joe. How Furiosa came to meet the Wives. And Max, making his way through the twisted and poisoned wasteland. All stories that flesh out these richly layered and fascinating people, and how they came to be what they are at the beginning of Fury Road.

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Riccardo Burchielli

Stories taken from the mind of George Miller... Given flesh by one of the co-writers of the Fury Road screenplay, Nico Lathouris, and myself. Illustrated and colored with enthusiasm and care by talented artists scattered over the globe. Every detail pored over and considered, altered and beaten into shape by the creators through the prism of years of immersion in the world of Mad Max. Stories that will give those folks who enjoyed the brilliant film a greater appreciation of the world and its history.
These are tales from the Fury Road.
So strap in, flick the kill switches, kick the engine over—and enjoy.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 23.11.2015

Cover art for Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe, by Tommy Lee Edwards

Vertigo for the DC Fan: Mark Sexton Introduces the Mad Max: Fury Road Comic

By Mark Sexton

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015


Mark Sexton worked as storyboard artist and concept artist on Mad Max: Fury Road. He is also the co-writer, along with George Miller and Nico Lathouris, and co-artist of the Mad Max: Fury Road comic series.

Comics now available include:

The debut issue, Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe E #1
Mad Max: Fury Road: Furiosa
Mad Max: Fury Road: Max
Mad Max: Fury Road: Compilation Book (3 comics above, collected)


Mad Max: Fury Road is an amazing film, but as writer and concept artist Mark Sexton makes clear, the movie's only part of the story. For the rest, you'll have to head to the comic shop.

Back in the dim, distant past—well, late 1982—I was a guest at a twelve-year old birthday party in a small flat somewhere in Adelaide (yes, I was twelve too, I’m not that old).

Sugared-up and full of red cordial, we bounced off the walls and each other, generally causing chaos but not too much property damage. The flat was a nice one, and under the television it sported a VCR (remember those?) and a small library of video cassettes in their clunky black plastic covers. In the midst of the hyperglycemic activity, one brave kid found a title with "R-rated” splashed across the spine, and in a thrill of illicit excitement, he stuck it in the VCR and pressed play.
It was Mad Max 2. You folks in the US of A know it as The Road Warrior.
And when the sound of that shrieking blower filled the air, and the camera pulled out of the darkness to begin 90 minutes of nitro-fuelled violence and nihilism, every single kid sat down in front of the television and didn’t move until the credits rolled. God knows where the adults were...
Suffice to say, I’d never seen anything like it. I was hooked.

Interior art by Mark Sexton for Nux and Immortan Joe. Mad Max: Fury Road

Fast forward seventeen years—1999. I was in my third year of a career as a storyboard artist working in Sydney. I got a call to come in to the production company of George Miller to talk about a film he wanted to do, something about a dancing penguin… I had heard on the grapevine of dark rumours that something else was happening in the building… That after 24 years, the director of the Mad Max films was secretly working on a sequel. A dancing penguin didn’t seem like quite the same thing, and I figured that it was just that: rumour.
So I went into the magnificent old Art Deco theatre and was directed up to the big room in the centre of the building that George used as his office. I wandered in through the glass doors and stopped dead in my tracks.
On a big electroboard in black ink was a logo. Harsh, jagged, bold and arresting. Four words.
Mad Max: Fury Road.
And art! There was art. Crazy, bonkers stuff. Wild vehicles, combinations of classic cars with airplane tails and shopping trolleys, spiked metal and harpoon cannons, crossbows and carnage. My heart nearly stopped. The rumours were true!

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

I did end up working on the dancing penguin movie, Happy Feet, following the animated adventures of Mumble and spending five years designing the white and blue world of a digital Antarctica. But before that eventuated, I spent two glorious years sitting in that big room with George, co-writer Brendan McCarthy and vehicle designer Peter Pound and we boarded the crap out of a wild, totally insane story that the world is just discovering now.
Peter and Brendan moved on to other jobs and other projects, and at the end of 2001 it was just George and I who finished the boards. Two years! But I wanted to stay in that world…
“George? Have you ever considered doing Mad Max comics?”
George looked thoughtful. “Oh. Let’s see… Hmmm. I’ll think about it.”
Fast forward another thirteen years—2014. Fury Road had achieved the impossible and had actually been shot and was in the throes of post-production. It was thrilling to know the insane project had actually happened, but bittersweet having not had anything more to do with it. Ah, well. Then my phone rang—it was George.
“Hi Mark. About those Mad Max comics? I think it’s a good idea…”
And so these four stories—prequels of some of the key characters of Fury Road—are finally realised. These are not just mere ephemera—not just cynically produced stories that have been hacked out to tie into a summer movie. These are legitimately authentic tales that were dreamed up by George during the production of the film and were told to the actors themselves—tales that gave the characters they played depth and history. The tales of Nux and Immortan Joe. How Furiosa came to meet the Wives. And Max, making his way through the twisted and poisoned wasteland. All stories that flesh out these richly layered and fascinating people, and how they came to be what they are at the beginning of Fury Road.

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Riccardo Burchielli

Stories taken from the mind of George Miller... Given flesh by one of the co-writers of the Fury Road screenplay, Nico Lathouris, and myself. Illustrated and colored with enthusiasm and care by talented artists scattered over the globe. Every detail pored over and considered, altered and beaten into shape by the creators through the prism of years of immersion in the world of Mad Max. Stories that will give those folks who enjoyed the brilliant film a greater appreciation of the world and its history.
These are tales from the Fury Road.
So strap in, flick the kill switches, kick the engine over—and enjoy.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Alexia Psaltis' artwork Subsumed, on display at the Art Gallery of NSW

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015.

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015


Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Subsumed. By Alexis Psaltis. The Rationale of the art work

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015.

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015


Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Art work by Alexia Psaltis

Art student gets subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald©Copyright 2015

Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Art work by Alexia Psaltis

Art student gets subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015

- Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald©Copyright 2015
.

Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Artwork by Alexia Psaltis

Art student gets Subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015.

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015


Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomedia
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Art work by Alexia Psaltis

Art student gets Subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015.

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015


[[picture:"Alexia Psaltis 1.jpg" ID:22808]]

Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomedia
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Australian Financial Review on 01.10.2013

Gallery in an art museum on the island of Naoshima in Japan

The Australian Financial Review Magazine. pp. 48-52.

October Magazine. Friday 27th October, 2013

Article: To Draw is to See

Drawing is a crucial tool in an architect’s kit, but it’s use goes way beyond drafting building plans. Six (prominent Australian) architects tell Katrina Strickland when and where they sketch – and how much it means to them.

One of the 6 Australian architects chosen to comment was Kytherian architect.....

Eva-Marie Prineas

Architect Prineas


Once I began studying architecture, the way I sketched changed. I sketch in the office and also try to sketch when we go away, although with two children aged three and five it is easier when I travel alone. I probably don’t sketch enough in meetings because l'm self-conscious. I’m not confident enough to sketch in front of a client when the idea is not yet fully formed. But I have seen how sketching can completely seduce a client - some architects are masters.

My father is from the Greek island of Kythera, which is south of the Peloponnese and north of Crete. When l was at university I started working on a conservation plan for our family house, which is at the top of the island in a village called Mitata.

When you go there it is like stepping back into the 1940’s. We got married there and until we had children, travelled there every summer. Our neighbour in Mitata, who is also an architect, organised a week of tango one summer. This sketch is of the master classes we would have in the morning in the old school house at the main square.

The image above is from the island of Naoshima in Japan, where there are a number of art museums including Chichu.

To enter one of the galleries here, you have to remove your shoes and put on little slippers. You go through a dark space first, then emerge into a diffusely lit white room. Three significant Monet paintings appear to float on each of the walls. I made this sketch from memory afterwards. I was taken by the small moves the architect made, which completely changed the way I perceived the paintings.