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Cafes, Shops & Cinemas / Friligianika

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Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by The Daily Examiner, Grafton on 18.01.2011

School children line up for the opening of the Saraton Theatre in 1926

Photograph included in an article entitled, Lights, Cameras and Plenty of Action, on page 2 of a 24 page Liftout to celebrate the "
re-opening of the refurbished Theatre.

The Liftout can be downloaded here:

Saraton_24p_Liftout_s.pdf

You can read all remaining articles in the Liftout.

First article:

After its grand reopening on November 23, 2010, we look back at the Saraton Theatre’s (Grafton, NSW) history, and the special place it holds in our hearts

By Ian Thomson

Throw yourself back to 1926. Joan Sutherland (the late opera diva Dame Joan) is born. So too is Jack Brabham (later knighted for his motor racing exploits). South Sydney Rabbitohs defeat University to win the NSW Rugby League premiership, a horse called Spearfelt lands a colossal betting plunge to win one of the most controversial Melbourne Cups on record, and back in the Clarence Valley, Cyllene Laddie, ridden by T Farthing, takes the Grafton Cup.

The cup carnival aside, Grafton was at the centre of attention as Mayor WT Robinson officially raised the curtain on the new Saraton Theatre on July 17. Alderman Robinson told an excited crowd at the opening that Notaras family members were to be applauded for providing the entertainment centre.

He said the occasion only went to show there were at least some men in the district who appreciated its value and were prepared to put in all they could to make Grafton a better place in which to live. “I hope it will be an example to many others who were reluctant to spend their money on progressive ventures to make this part of the state more attractive from the point of view of up-to-date institutions,” the mayor said.

Big screens everywhere were showing enthralling movies featuring the Hollywood stars of the time – including the swashbuckling Douglas Fairbanks, the sultry Greta Garbo, heart-throb Rudolph Valentino and the sweet Mary Pickford. For a time in the ’30s fire damage brought the curtain down on the screening of movies. Instead, the Saraton was home to dances, concerts and social functions.

The Notaras family bit the bullet in 1940 and had the interior completely remodelled to produce what was described at the time as “an ultra-modern luxury theatre on the lines of the metropolitan picture shows”.

The fact World War II had broken out just 10 months before was not lost on Country Party founder and brieflyPrime Minister, Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page, who had the job of opening the magnificent new cinema complex. He emphasised the importance of providing entertainment in times of conflict, saying one of the three principles of winning wars was to keep up the spirit of the people.

“Men and women are better able to work hard and continuously if they are entertained,” he said. “I am sure that in these times we will think clearly, work better, plan straighter if we mix work with amusement, and therefore I am glad to open this place of entertainment.”

Sir Earle Page’s comments, made the day before the Battle of Britain began, flew in the face of calls by patriotic conservatives to close down theatres and cinemas, claiming they did not contribute to the war effort. Records show Grafton and South Grafton had, at some period, at least seven theatres that were being individually used for the showing of movies.

According to the Heritage Council, only the Saraton Theatre remains as representative and symbolic of a time when attending a picture theatre was the principal passive recreational activity of the general population.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by The Daily Examiner, Grafton on 18.01.2011

Lights, Camera's and Plenty of Action

After its grand reopening on November 23, 2010, we look back at the Saraton Theatre’s (Grafton, NSW) history, and the special place it holds in our hearts

This is the header for the first article in a 24 page Lifout produced by the Daily Examiner.

The Liftout can be downloaded here:


Saraton_24p_Liftout_s.pdf

You can read all remaining articles in the Liftout.

By Ian Thomson

Throw yourself back to 1926. Joan Sutherland (the late opera diva Dame Joan) is born. So too is Jack Brabham (later knighted for his motor racing exploits). South Sydney Rabbitohs defeat University to win the NSW Rugby League premiership, a horse called Spearfelt lands a colossal betting plunge to win one of the most controversial Melbourne Cups on record, and back in the Clarence Valley, Cyllene Laddie, ridden by T Farthing, takes the Grafton Cup.

The cup carnival aside, Grafton was at the centre of attention as Mayor WT Robinson officially raised the curtain on the new Saraton Theatre on July 17. Alderman Robinson told an excited crowd at the opening that Notaras family members were to be applauded for providing the entertainment centre.

He said the occasion only went to show there were at least some men in the district who appreciated its value and were prepared to put in all they could to make Grafton a better place in which to live. “I hope it will be an example to many others who were reluctant to spend their money on progressive ventures to make this part of the state more attractive from the point of view of up-to-date institutions,” the mayor said.

Big screens everywhere were showing enthralling movies featuring the Hollywood stars of the time – including the swashbuckling Douglas Fairbanks, the sultry Greta Garbo, heart-throb Rudolph Valentino and the sweet Mary Pickford. For a time in the ’30s fire damage brought the curtain down on the screening of movies. Instead, the Saraton was home to dances, concerts and social functions.

The Notaras family bit the bullet in 1940 and had the interior completely remodelled to produce what was described at the time as “an ultra-modern luxury theatre on the lines of the metropolitan picture shows”.

The fact World War II had broken out just 10 months before was not lost on Country Party founder and brieflyPrime Minister, Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page, who had the job of opening the magnificent new cinema complex. He emphasised the importance of providing entertainment in times of conflict, saying one of the three principles of winning wars was to keep up the spirit of the people.

“Men and women are better able to work hard and continuously if they are entertained,” he said. “I am sure that in these times we will think clearly, work better, plan straighter if we mix work with amusement, and therefore I am glad to open this place of entertainment.”

Sir Earle Page’s comments, made the day before the Battle of Britain began, flew in the face of calls by patriotic conservatives to close down theatres and cinemas, claiming they did not contribute to the war effort. Records show Grafton and South Grafton had, at some period, at least seven theatres that were being individually used for the showing of movies.

According to the Heritage Council, only the Saraton Theatre remains as representative and symbolic of a time when attending a picture theatre was the principal passive recreational activity of the general population.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 08.11.2010

Angelo & Spiro Notaras all smiles on opening day for the Saraton Theatre

Clarence Valley Review, 16 page supplement, 22nd September, 2010.

Full version, now downloadable at:

Saraton_Theatre_22_Sept_2010.pdf

Back from the brink

Geoff Helisma


Article, page 2 of the supplement

In 1999 many country cinemas were enduring hard economic times. The Saraton Theatre was set to become a victim of those times, and was on the verge of being demolished to make way for a car park. The state government had imposed a temporary heritage order on the building, Grafton was divided, and the debate raged on, as highlighted in an ABC 7.30 report on the issue.

Then Grafton councillor, Peter McKenna, described it as “just a fibro building” that had passed its used-by date. Then deputy mayor, Heather Rowland, who was described in the Maxine McKew hosted story as “historically sensitive”, said: “I believe shoppers need car parks, it’s as simple as that.”

Bruno Notaras said: “We’re all sentimental about it. Unfortunately we have to face facts, facts of life.” According to Bruno, as he spoke to ABC reporter, Jacinta Tynan, the Notaras family was left with no alternative other than selling the property. “The family has voted unanimously to do what they’ve done,” he said.

“We just got to the stage we’ve got to face facts. “There are members of the family who can’t get a pension because they’ve got shares in the place, and this is tragic. I think, from our point of view, it’s the only thing to do.”

Of the 12 councillors, one, Leo Ellis, saw things differently. “This is really a historical town, Grafton, and I do believe the historical and heritage is our lifeblood, it’s our lifeblood if we look after it properly,” he said. “If we destroy the Saraton Theatre and them other buildings there, it’s going to leave a gap in an otherwise heritage street.”

The National Trust’s Graham Quint shared Cr Ellis’s opinion. “It’s one of the most decorative and architecturally handsome theatres in NSW,” he said. “It’s on the Royal Institute of Architects’ list of buildings of 20th century significance and it’s one of the last remaining theatres in NSW with a balcony.”

But, as it turns out, on that fateful day in May of 1999, the 7.30 Report ended its story with a last minute, unexpected twist, in the form of a fax from the developer “saying he intends to withdraw his application to take down the theatre”. “But the theatre hasn’t heard the news,” Jacinta Tynan concluded. “We await the sequel.”

Turns out that the sequel had a happy ending, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Vassilia Corones on 14.12.2006

Jim Corones and Quilpie

Author: Vassilia Corones
When Published:
Publisher:Polyurn Press
Address: 28 Carabella Street,
Kirribilli, NSW, 2061
Available:
Description:
ISBN: 0 646 25692 0

An account of the life of Jim Corones who migrated from Greece in 1905, and lived his life in the tiny outback Queensland town of Quilpie with generosity, courage and good fellowship leaving the town the better for his unflagging involvement in all aspects of life in this "oasis" in a harsh country.

Leaving Kythira in the Greek Ionioan Islands with his uncle, Harry Corones, Jim Corones was eleven when he landed in Australia. From humble but typical beginnings, both Harry and Jim were to become extremely successful businessmen. The first years in Australia were years of low wages, long hours and terrible conditions. Moving from Sydney and cleaning fish to a better opening in Brisbane, Harry ensured that Jim had a good education.

Within five years Harry was in a position to buy a cafe in Charleville and thus the path of both men's lives was set.

From a cafe in Charleville, Harry and Jim were to become two of Queensland's foremost hoteliers. It was in Harry's Charleville Hotel that plans for the establishment of an airway were discussed, later to become Qantas. Jim and Harry were foundation shareholders.

By 1929, Harry's dream was realised with the completion of the first class Corones Hotel, graced over the years celebrity guests that included the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, Charles Kingsford Smith, Amy Johnston and Gracie Fields.

Harry thrived in Charleville and in recognition of his services to the community, he was awarded the MBE in 1969.

Jim meanwhile had moved on to "nearby" Quilpie (138 rail miles from Charleville) and gave of himself to Quilpie as Harry gave of himself to Charleville. Devising a means to supply electricity, in 1933 Quilpie was an outback rarity - street night lighting and electricity to all the shops as well as the Corones owned hotels and properties.

As with the Corones hotels in Charleville, the Corones hotels in Quilpie were a delight to locals and travellers alike, situated as they were in the middle of nowhere but with decor, service and food expected only in the best hotels of Brisbane and Sydney.

Five hundred or more arrived from across Queensland and New South Wales for Jim's funeral in 1966.

In his panegyric, Brother Max Timbrell of the Bush Brotherhood said Jim "was a man of rich character, a man of great energy and talent. The monuments to his talents are visible in our town- public utilities which even today could not be closed because they were built to give service. That service was of a pioneering nature."

This book tells the story of these two men from the Greek island of Kythira who helped develop western Queensland, making Australia their home.

From:

http://www.fastbooks.com.au/autobiography.html

***SOLD OUT ***SOLD OUT ***SOLD OUT

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Saraton Theatre, Grafton NSW. Another view from a high vantage point on the neighbouring railway bridge.

Still owned by the Notaras Family.

There are numerous references to the Saraton Theatre at kythera-family.

Search under "Saraton".

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW. Looking south-west from a high vantage point on the neighbouring railway bridge.

Still owned by the Notaras Family.

There are numerous references to the Saraton Theatre at kythera-family.

Search under "Saraton".

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Saraton Theatre, Grafton NSW, looking across the "famous" Clocktower.

Still owned by the Notaras Family.

There are numerous references to the Saraton Theatre at kythera-family.

Search under "Saraton".

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW. Looking North along Prince Street.

Still owned by the Notaras Family.

There are numerous references to the Saraton Theatre at kythera-family.

Search under "Saraton".

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW. Signage.

Still owned by the Notaras Family.

There are numerous references to the Saraton Theatre at kythera-family.

Search under "Saraton".

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Saraton Theatre, Grafton. NSW. Frontage. May, 2006.

Still owned by the Notaras Family.

There are numerous references to the Saraton Theatre at kythera-family.

Search under "Saraton".

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by The Daily Examiner, Grafton on 29.05.2006

Shaping the new Australia

South of the River: The stylish Marble Bar Cafe was just one of seven Greek Cafes in Grafton and one which enjoyed longevity.

The Daily Examiner, Grafton. August 30, 2003, page 8.

by Juris Graney


The history of Greek cafes in the Clarence Valley is being documented by two historians as part of a project called ‘In Their Own Image: Greek Australians’.

The national project, which began in 1982, is being headed by Macquarie University lecturer Leonard Janiszewski and photographer Effy Alexakis. The names read like a who’s who of the Clarence Valley. People like Lambrinos Notaras and sons Ioannis, Antonios and Theodore Lambros Notaras, who owned the Marble Bar Cafe in 1937, John Moulos, of the Hygiene Cafe, also in 1937, Peter Bernard (formerly Venardos), of the Popular Cafe, and Louis Hatgis, of the Waratah Cafe in 1949.

Mr Janiszewski’s passionate look at the the Greek influence on Austrahan society is one that will keep on growing, according to the historian, “We could probably go into two books but you have to know when to stop," Mr Janiszewski said.
“The history of Austrahan culture has always been looked at from an orthodox historical perspective but we are a hybrid­ culture.

“We are affected by dif­ferent cultures and that ex­perience makes us the place that Australia is. “The Greek people and
their influence on Australia are not marginal, they are influential and what we are doing (the book) would have been laughed at 20 years ago.

Mr Janiszewski said he did not focus on Greek cafes simply because they were considered marginal or just because they were Greek. “The Greek Cafe helped Australia develop to where it is now,” he said.

“The Americanisation of Australia happened because the Greek cafes introduced things like the jukebox, Coca Cola and ice-cream. “The people who operat­ed the cafes and the people who frequented the cafes are integral to Australian culture.”

For two decades, Mr Janiszewski has worked with photographer Effy Alexakis, who had been challenging the visual stereotypes of Greeks in Australia.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Hugh Gilchrist on 30.05.2006

Marble Bar Cafe, Prince Street, Grafton. (c.1912).

Left to right:

1. Lambrinos Notaras (1860-1932), father of Jack and Anthony;

2. unknown(??) [Identified as Sarantos Zantiotis by Mary Conomos]

3. Jack Notaras (1892-1962);

4. Unknown(??) (although wrongly designated in the book as James Zantiotis)

5. James Zantiotis (youngest lad)

6. Anthony Notaras (1895-1992), father of Angelo, Mitchell, John, Irene, and Betty Notaras.

From page 208, Australians and Greeks. Volume 1. The Early Years.

Author:Hugh Gilchrist
When Published: 1992
Publisher:Halstead Press
Available from:
Angelo Notaras
Atom Industries
PO Box 513, Rozelle NSW 2039
AUSTRALIA
Fax +61 2 9810 6691

Email order, here

or,

Email order, here

Price: A$60 each incl GST and air post and packing to anywhere in the world.

About Australians and Greeks, Volume 1

To gain an insight into Hugh's motivation for writing Australians and Greeks

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) on 28.05.2006

Marble Bar Cafe. Grafton.

Period unknown.

From the photographic collection of the Clarence River Historical Society.

Schaeffer House

190 Fitzroy St.
Grafton NSW 2460
Australia

PO Box 396
Grafton NSW 2460

Ph: (02) 6642 5212
Fax:(02) 6642 5212

Email, Clarence River Historical Society
www.nor.com.au/community/museums

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Clarence River Historical Society on 27.05.2006

Lambrinos Notaras. Refreshment Rooms.

Grafton NSW.

From the photographic collection of the Clarence River Historical Society.

Schaeffer House

190 Fitzroy St.
Grafton NSW 2460
Australia

PO Box 396
Grafton NSW 2460

Ph: (02) 6642 5212
Fax:(02) 6642 5212

Email, Clarence River Historical Society
www.nor.com.au/community/museums

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Vassilia Corones on 30.12.2005

Club Hotel at Quilpie, Queensland.

Harry Corones' involvement in the hotel industry extended to Quilpie, where he came to operate three hotels which were placed under the management of his nephew and partner, Jim, and another nephew, Harry George Corones.

In August 1921 the Quilpie Hotel, in Brolga Street, was purchased from Ernest and Emma Culliford, and in 1925 the Imperial Hotel was constructed on the corner of Brolga and Buln Buln Streets.

In 1926 a fire swept through Quilpie and destroyed the Quilpie Hotel. A new Quilpie Hotel, known as "The Brick" was erected on the site in late 1925 and completed in 1926.

In October 1934 the Club Hotel was leased from Castlemaine Perkins Brewery.

This hotel was purchased in 1965.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Vassilia Corones on 13.05.2006

Hotel Charleville ca. 1915.

The Hotel Charleville as viewed from Alfred Street, Charleville. A large double storey timber building with a wide wrap-around verandah. Some stripped hessian blinds have been used for protection from the elements.

The roof line has various gables and decorative timber work, with signage on the front of the hotel nominating H. Corones as the proprietor.

Other signs on the building advertise Albert Calcino, hairdresser and tabacconist.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Vassilia Corones on 30.12.2005

Aerial views of the town centre Charleville, 1934.

Charleville, Central Queensland, is the location of the famous Charleville Hotel, later the Hotel Corones.

Given Harry Corones's fascination with aviation, this is the most appropriate vantage point from which to take a photograph of Charleville.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) on 27.01.2005

Marble Bar Cafe, Grafton.

Owned by the Notaras family.