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Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 05.05.2007

Australia Cafe - Inverell NSW Australia

A paper bag for sweets/chocolates etc from the Australia Cafe Otho Street Inverell NSW
c1936.
Sid & Harry Zantis(Zantiotis - Potamos)

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 27.05.2004

Leonard Janiszewski & Effy Alexakis on ABC Radio - Greek-Australian Cafe culture

Radio National Program, *ABC Radio, Australia.

*ABC stands for Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and is the Public (Government, non-commercial) broadcaster in Australia.

From,

http://www.abc.net.au/rn/talks/perspective/stories/s944776.htm

presented by Sandy McCutcheon
on Monday 15/09/2003

Leonard Janiszewski (written with Effy Alexakis)

Summary:
California Dreaming: 'The Greek cafe' and its role in the Americanisation of Australian eating and social habits

Transcript of this program:

The national commercial success of the ‘Greek café’ - broadly regarded as a quintessentially Australian phenomenon and particularly synonymous with rural life in the eastern states of New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland – was, to a degree, a ‘Trojan Horse’ for the Americanisation of Australian eating and social habits well before the second-half of the twentieth century. The ‘Greek café’ firmly evidences a marriage of American food catering ideas to British-Australian tastes, including the association of food with entertainment and fantasy. This union had been instigated through Australia’s earlier Greek-run food catering enterprises – the oyster saloon or ‘parlor’ (American spelling was usually used) of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the ‘American style’ soda bar/sundae ‘parlor’ which had appeared by the mid-1910s, and the ‘American style’ milk bar which had emerged by the early 1930s; the ‘milk bar’ was initially created in Australia, based upon early 1930s American drug store soda bars, and then taken to Great Britain, and to a lesser extent, the United States.

The American influence was essentially generated by Greeks who had relatives or friends working in the United States in food catering enterprises, or who had been there themselves working in such establishments. The classic Greek country café, which experienced its golden period from the mid-1930s to late1960s, was primarily an evolutionary amalgam of its three predecessors. In names such as the California, Niagara, Monterey, Astoria, Hollywood, New York and Golden Gate, the American component of the Greek café’s creation is well suggested, but more so in its provision of customers with American sundaes, milkshakes, sodas and freezes or crushes, American confectionery (hard sugar candies and milk chocolate bars), and another popular product, American ice cream.

During the Greek cafe’s golden age, an important and close working relationship developed with picture theatres – an association between food and entertainment which had initially been suggested by early soda fountain service and back bar designs which emphasised fantasy by use of coloured lights, mirrors and stained glass (‘the light fantastic’). Again, these relationships had been adopted from the United States by Greek-Australian café proprietors. Indeed, a significant number of picture theatre operators were Greek-Australians who had or continued to run cafés. By the 1950s many Greek cafes had introduced juke-boxes as part of their entertainment component. American and British popular music attracted a youth clientele and culture to these establishments, many young Australians mimicking the clothing, attitude and language of their overseas singing idols. In a sense, for most of the twentieth century, Greek cafes were selling a dream – essentially an American dream. Even the Art Deco style of architecture which characterized Greek cafes and picture theatres appears to have been, to some extent, influenced by American rather than European Art Deco designs, particularly those undertaken by Greek-Australian shop fitters whose design templates were based upon Greek-American cafes.

Unfortunately the Australian Greek café’s link to America also assisted, in part, with its demise in the final decades of the twentieth century – American lead corporatised fast food began to replace family-based food catering concerns, take-away rather than sit-down meals burgeoned. Combined with the initial impact of television which challenged cinema, rural economic rationalisation, the by-passing of country townships by arterial inter-urban highways upon which road houses (supplying both food and fuel) developed, the advent of supermarkets and convenience stores providing packaged ice creams and chocolates, bottled flavoured milk and aerated drinks, and counter lunches at pubs and clubs, most Greek cafes were forced to transform into take-aways or be relegated into memory or oblivion. A greater diversity of employment choices for the well-educated younger generation of Australian-born Greek, further compounded the demise. Generally, only those Greek cafes in major recreational and tourist regions have survived the sweeping tide of change.

Australians from non-English speaking background have impacted greatly upon Australia’s development – the ‘Greek café’ being a pertinent example – yet, the nation’s grand historical narratives only reveal their presence as marginal entities. There is a real need for multi-lingual research in the fields of Australian history and heritage to release the broader canvas of this nation’s history from its cultural myopia and reveal the significance which cultural diversity and hybridity has had in developing the Australia of today. Untying the restrictive binds of the English language straightjacket will undoubtedly lead to new Australian visions of our past and heritage. Professional Australian historians with linguistic skills in a language or languages other than English, and who are prepared to engage in research utilising these skills, are presently rare. History Week (13 to 21 September) – an initiative undertaken by the History Council of New South Wales – is an appropriate time for all Australians to seriously consider that facilitating and encouraging the development of such historians is essential to revealing who we are, and potentially, what we could become.

Guests on this program:
Historian, Leonard Janiszewski, and documentary photographer,
Effy Alexakis, have been researching the Greek-Australian historical and contemporary presence in both Australia and Greece since 1982. Their project and archives, In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians, encompasses visual, oral and literary material and is based at Macquarie University, Sydney, in association with the Department of Modern History and the Australian History Museum. Various national and international touring exhibitions, books, articles and a film documentary have been produced. Alexakis’ photographs are held in both public and private collections in Australia – most significantly in the Australian National Gallery, Canberra, and the NSW State Library, Sydney.

Producer:
Keri Phillips

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 07.12.2004

Capitol Cafe East Row, Canberra, ACT, Australia, 1937

Capitol Cafe
East Row, Canberra, ACT, 1937

The Capitol, perhaps the most renowned of the Australian capital's early Greek cafes, opened its doors on Thursday morning, 27 October, 1927. It continued to serve the needs of Canberra's growing population for the next thirty years.

Back Row, from left: Spero Cassidy, Jack Cassidy, Theo Notaras, Manuel Calligeris and Peter Cassidy.
Front Row: Agapy Cassidy, Katina Notaris and Hariklia Cassidy (nee Mihalakaki)

From the Macquarie University site at,

http://www.austhistmuseum.mq.edu.au/greek/capitol.htm

According to ABC Radio, Harry Notaras's Capitol was the first cafe opened in the Australian Capital Territory.

http://www.abc.net.au/canberra/real/stories/s877359.htm

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 09.12.2004

Sytematic Research - Greek-Australian Cafe culture

Effy Alexakis & Leonard Janiszewski, based at Macquarie University, have been undertaking systematic research into the Greek-Australian Cafe phenomenon for decades.

Please contact them if you have any information about your parents, grandparents, uncles, cousins etc - cafe.

From,

http://www.austhistmuseum.mq.edu.au/greek/new.htm

THE GREEK CAFÉ

We are currently doing research on the Greek café, initially focusing on New South Wales, and later nationally. For many of those who recall the heyday of the Greek café during the 1940s - 1960s, these enterprises are revered as a phenomenon which was quintessentially Australian. Providing a regular income, independence, maintenance of the family unit, and requiring only limited education and knowledge of English, cafes became a popular form of small business ownership or employment for numerous Greek-Australians. Today, the dwindling populations of various country towns and the introduction of corporatised fast food outlets have resulted in the conspicuously rapid decline of the cafes.

We are seeking those who owned, worked in, or regularly frequented Greek-owned cafes and milk bars throughout NSW. We are conducting interviews, copying photographs and documenting associated memorabilia. If you can provide an insight into your café experiences or have material which you feel could be of assistance to our research please contact us at

In Their Own Image: Greek Australians
National Research Project and Archives
Department of Modern History,
Macquarie University. NSW. 2109.

Ph: 02 9850 6886.
Fax: 02 9850 6594

Emails:

greekoz@hmn.mq.edu.au
effy.alexakis@mq.edu.au

www.austhistmuseum.mq.edu.au/greek/

The picture gallery can be accessed at:

http://www.austhistmuseum.mq.edu.au/greek/gallery.htm

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 08.05.2004

Gunnedah - Loula Zantiotis - The Busy Bee Cafe - Newcastle Herald article

"Loula" Zantiotis and the Busy Bee Cafe

Mrs Theodora Zantiotis
242 Conadilly St
GUNNEDAH
NSW 2380

On Saturday, August 16th, 2003, page 29, the Newcastle Herald,

http://www.theherald.com.au/

published the following article about Loula Zantiotis and the Busy Bee Cafe.

Light grows dim from beacons of hospitality.

By, Philippa Murray.

Stopping at the Greek cafe on the way home was once a ritual in country life. The lights were always on, the faces always welcoming, and the meals hot. As a traveller or country dweller, it represented a singular, comforting port of call before another long, hungry and thirsty drive. For those on farms or passing through outside buisness hours, the cafe was the only place that could be relied on as a suitable changeover point for everything from pups to pullovers.

The past three decades have wreaked closure on many of the cafes run by Greek families in regional Australia. Victims of social change, retail laws, lifestyle choices and their own success, these beacons of hospitality in the bush are practically extinct.

The Busy Bee, pictured, in the north western NSW town of Gunnedah, is one survivor of the glorious cafe era, its decor and owner intact.

It is a gem of a place, where little has changed since its glamorous fittings were installed in 1936 by cafe interior designer Stephen Varvaressos, at the behest of the proprietor, Lambros Zantiotis.

A temple of art deco design with illuminated Greek columns at the back counter to display the soda ware and cigarettes, it remains a monument to its time. Old electric fans whir in the summer heat, and the steel lids of the refrigerated cabinets clunk like they always did when they are opened for ice-cream or fruit drinks.

Etched in the glass at the top of the shop is the cafe name, underneath which is written Peters and Co, a common enough sight according to social reseracher Leonard Janiszewski of Macquarie University.
"They may have possibly being hoping to highlight an association with Peters' American Delicacy Company Ltd., later to become popular ice-cream manufacturer, Peters", he said.

Janiszewski has been gathering material on Greek cafes in regional NSW for almost a decade as part of a study of the Americanisation of Australian eating and social habits. These cafes were responsible for our introduction to much American confectionery, sodas, ice-cream, milkshakes and crushes.

Some cafes began as oyster bars, but were soon to switch to the craze of American-style snacks and food.

White Rose and Blue Rose were popular brands of chocolate, while the Golden Gate, the Niagara, the Hollywood and the Monterey, familiar names to cafe habitues, are all about the American connection.

Some Greek families liked to cling to their Hellenic roots by choosing names such as Olympia, the Acropolis and the Parthenon.

In Gunnedah's Busy Bee, there has been scant sacrifice to the last half century, save a glass doors drink fridge in the place of a confectionery counter, and the cigarettes being moved beyond the reach of shoplifters.

At 71, "Loula" Zantiotis still runs the shop although for how much longer, she is unsure. Since her husband Peter died seven years ago, she has continued to open the folding wooden doors at the front of the shop but for shorter hours, and with a reduced menu. Her three children have departed for the city with no intention of returning to the business.

Loula arrived from Kythera, the same Greek island from which her husband came, and married in Sydney in 1954, before being whisked some 400km away.

Freindhips were formed with other Greek families who owned the other four cafes in town and trips made regularly to Tamworth to attend the Greek Orthodox church.

But life outside the shop was largely non-existent. The cafe, in its heyday, employed six people including a cook, kitchenmaids and waiters, and opened seven days a week from 7am to 11.30pm.

A 70-year old menu lists rump steak, eggs and chips at one shilling and ninepence - less than 20 cents in todays' currency. The menu boasted proudly that the Busy Bee, whose insignia still adorns crockery owned by the family, offered "promptitude, attention, pleasant courtesy, quality, cleanliness, comfort, convenience and organisation."

Manny Zantiotis, the youngest of the family, remembers being the envy of his school friends when he went "home" to the cafe and its attractions of having anything you wanted to eat and drink. He said his father always told him "you don't want to do this" as he worked ceaselessly in the shop.

Like many hard working migrants, he wanted only for his children to get a good education and better opportunities. Manny's jobs would include re-stocking the shelves, rising early to light the stove, turning on the coffee machines and toaster, and cleaning down benches in the kitchen.

The swinging kitchen door always held some fear for young Emmanuel, as above iot his father kept a leather strap, a constant reminder of tasks to be completed.

"I remember a lot of people saying, don't ever change. My father never installed a deep fryer and stove for takeaways out the front. There was never that smell. It was always nice and clean, not greasy. It is to his credit that he stuck to his guns."

The 36-year old computer technician said the thought of selling the cafe leaves him with mixed feelings.

Mrs Zantiotis has an air of resignation when it comes to talk of the future. No buyers have come forward for the business she has helped to foster and grow for almost a century. If the cafe is not sold as a going concern, she intends to sell the historic fittings and keep the building.

Meanwhile, it's business as usual in her office, with its newspaper and magazine stacks, and the wall mounted telephone with the double bells.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 03.05.2004

Cremorne Tea Gardens set up by Theodore Politis in the Melbourne suburb of St Kilda in 1916.

The Cremorne Tea Gardens set up by Theodore Politis in the Melbourne suburb of St Kilda in 1916.

Politis came from the island of Leukas to Australia in 1901.

I include this photograph here because another Politis, George Politis, an emigrant - initially TO Karavas, Kythera - would later, emigrate to Brisbane, Australia, and establish a shop there.

His son, Nick Politis, would later achieve both fame and fortune in Sydney, NSW.


To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island......

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 03.05.2004

Woodburn, NSW - Kytherian store owner near the front counter of his store, circa 1922/23.

Kytherian store owner near the front counter of his store at Woodburn, NSW, circa 1922/23.

The cafe owner has not been identified.

Can anyone help to identify him?



To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island......


For those wanting to know the exact location of Woodburn:

Woodburn

Small township located on Richmond River, 723 km north of Sydney on the Pacific Highway. It lies south of the towns of Ballina and Broadwater.

The Woodburn catchment had a population of 496 at the 1996 census which had grown from 475 in 1991. This represents an annual growth rate of 0.8%. The 1998 population is estimated at 516.

The district we now call Woodburn was known as 'maniworkan' to the local Aborigines.

For thousands of years prior to European settlement, the Richmond River and the Woodburn area was inhabited by the Bundjalung Aborigines who survived on the rich mixture of fish, shellfish, wallabies and turtles which abounded.

The cedar cutters who arrived in the area in the early 1840s originally called the settlement Rocky Mouth. Unfortunately Rocky Mouth was already being used elsewhere in the state and the name was changed to Woodburn by William Gollan, the town's first postmaster. This became official in 1896.

There was considerable activity in the area by the 1840s. In 1847 a local timber merchant named Billy Wright employed a shipwright company to build him a number of large vessels. These vessels were launched in the early 1850s and began to ply the Richmond River. A number of ports grew along the river at this time including Wardell, Broadwater and Coraki.

In the early 1860s a township began to form near the present day site of Woodburn. It is believed that William Cravigan, who took up land in 1863, was the town's first settler. Throughout the 1860s and 1870s people settled on the river bank near Cravigan's house. This tiny community had become a kind of township when William Gollan opened a general store and post office in 1868. Shortly afterwards a number of shops and hotels were built and the town had its first policeman by 1879. At this time most of the town's development was occurring on the northern side of the Richmond River. The first significant building on the southern side was the Presbyterian Church which was completed in 1869. The following year a school was built nearby. During the 1870s the whole area became an important sugar growing area.

Such was the activity on the Richmond River at this time that Woodburn grew into an important port. In 1884 the Woodburn Court House was opened and the following year Woodburn was formally proclaimed a village.

Perhaps the most interesting of all the developments around the town occurred in 1882 when a number of Italians settled near Woodburn. 'In 1880, the ill-fated Marquis de Rays expedition of 340 hopeful migrants from Veneto, Italy, sailed to make a new home in New Ireland (now part of Papua New Guinea).

'Here they struggled against fever, starvation and the jungle, and many died. After four months the survivors made their way to Noumea and sought aid from the Government of New South Wales. The Premier, Sir Henry Parkes, arranged their safe transport. They reached Sydney on 7 th April, 1881. A number of them came to this place and built a happy and prosperous settlement, which was called "New Italy". Nothing now remains of their homes. But the quiet pride, the courage and strength of these Italian pioneers will always be remembered in this district with respect and gratitude.'

Woodburn has continued to be an important river port. However, as the importance of transportation along the Richmond River has declined, the town has become less important. Today it survives more because it is on the Pacific Highway and therefore is a stopover for travellers making their way from Sydney to Queensland.

For further information, see


www.walkabout.com.au/theage/fairfax/locations/NSWWoodburn.shtml

And,


www.richmondvalley.nsw.gov.au/tourism/wburn.html

And,


www.richmondnet.com.au/.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 03.05.2004

Woodburn, NSW - Kytherian store owner at counter of his store, circa 1922/23.

Kytherian store owner at counter of his store at Woodburn, NSW, circa 1922/23.

The cafe owner has not been identified.

Can anyone help to identify him?



To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island......


For those wanting to know the exact location of Woodburn:

Woodburn

Small township located on Richmond River, 723 km north of Sydney on the Pacific Highway. It lies south of the towns of Ballina and Broadwater.

The Woodburn catchment had a population of 496 at the 1996 census which had grown from 475 in 1991. This represents an annual growth rate of 0.8%. The 1998 population is estimated at 516.

The district we now call Woodburn was known as 'maniworkan' to the local Aborigines.

For thousands of years prior to European settlement, the Richmond River and the Woodburn area was inhabited by the Bundjalung Aborigines who survived on the rich mixture of fish, shellfish, wallabies and turtles which abounded.

The cedar cutters who arrived in the area in the early 1840s originally called the settlement Rocky Mouth. Unfortunately Rocky Mouth was already being used elsewhere in the state and the name was changed to Woodburn by William Gollan, the town's first postmaster. This became official in 1896.

There was considerable activity in the area by the 1840s. In 1847 a local timber merchant named Billy Wright employed a shipwright company to build him a number of large vessels. These vessels were launched in the early 1850s and began to ply the Richmond River. A number of ports grew along the river at this time including Wardell, Broadwater and Coraki.

In the early 1860s a township began to form near the present day site of Woodburn. It is believed that William Cravigan, who took up land in 1863, was the town's first settler. Throughout the 1860s and 1870s people settled on the river bank near Cravigan's house. This tiny community had become a kind of township when William Gollan opened a general store and post office in 1868. Shortly afterwards a number of shops and hotels were built and the town had its first policeman by 1879. At this time most of the town's development was occurring on the northern side of the Richmond River. The first significant building on the southern side was the Presbyterian Church which was completed in 1869. The following year a school was built nearby. During the 1870s the whole area became an important sugar growing area.

Such was the activity on the Richmond River at this time that Woodburn grew into an important port. In 1884 the Woodburn Court House was opened and the following year Woodburn was formally proclaimed a village.

Perhaps the most interesting of all the developments around the town occurred in 1882 when a number of Italians settled near Woodburn. 'In 1880, the ill-fated Marquis de Rays expedition of 340 hopeful migrants from Veneto, Italy, sailed to make a new home in New Ireland (now part of Papua New Guinea).

'Here they struggled against fever, starvation and the jungle, and many died. After four months the survivors made their way to Noumea and sought aid from the Government of New South Wales. The Premier, Sir Henry Parkes, arranged their safe transport. They reached Sydney on 7 th April, 1881. A number of them came to this place and built a happy and prosperous settlement, which was called "New Italy". Nothing now remains of their homes. But the quiet pride, the courage and strength of these Italian pioneers will always be remembered in this district with respect and gratitude.'

Woodburn has continued to be an important river port. However, as the importance of transportation along the Richmond River has declined, the town has become less important. Today it survives more because it is on the Pacific Highway and therefore is a stopover for travellers making their way from Sydney to Queensland.

For further information, see

www.walkabout.com.au/theage/fairfax/locations/NSWWoodburn.shtml

And,

www.richmondvalley.nsw.gov.au/tourism/wburn.html

And,

www.richmondnet.com.au/

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 03.05.2004

Woodburn, NSW - Kytherian store owner in his store, circa 1922/23.

Kytherian store owner in his store at Woodburn, NSW, circa 1922/23.

The cafe owner has not been identified.

Can anyone help to identify him?



To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island......


For those wanting to know the exact location of Woodburn:

Woodburn

Small township located on Richmond River, 723 km north of Sydney on the Pacific Highway. It lies south of the towns of Ballina and Broadwater.

The Woodburn catchment had a population of 496 at the 1996 census which had grown from 475 in 1991. This represents an annual growth rate of 0.8%. The 1998 population is estimated at 516.

The district we now call Woodburn was known as 'maniworkan' to the local Aborigines.

For thousands of years prior to European settlement, the Richmond River and the Woodburn area was inhabited by the Bundjalung Aborigines who survived on the rich mixture of fish, shellfish, wallabies and turtles which abounded.

The cedar cutters who arrived in the area in the early 1840s originally called the settlement Rocky Mouth. Unfortunately Rocky Mouth was already being used elsewhere in the state and the name was changed to Woodburn by William Gollan, the town's first postmaster. This became official in 1896.

There was considerable activity in the area by the 1840s. In 1847 a local timber merchant named Billy Wright employed a shipwright company to build him a number of large vessels. These vessels were launched in the early 1850s and began to ply the Richmond River. A number of ports grew along the river at this time including Wardell, Broadwater and Coraki.

In the early 1860s a township began to form near the present day site of Woodburn. It is believed that William Cravigan, who took up land in 1863, was the town's first settler. Throughout the 1860s and 1870s people settled on the river bank near Cravigan's house. This tiny community had become a kind of township when William Gollan opened a general store and post office in 1868. Shortly afterwards a number of shops and hotels were built and the town had its first policeman by 1879. At this time most of the town's development was occurring on the northern side of the Richmond River. The first significant building on the southern side was the Presbyterian Church which was completed in 1869. The following year a school was built nearby. During the 1870s the whole area became an important sugar growing area.

Such was the activity on the Richmond River at this time that Woodburn grew into an important port. In 1884 the Woodburn Court House was opened and the following year Woodburn was formally proclaimed a village.

Perhaps the most interesting of all the developments around the town occurred in 1882 when a number of Italians settled near Woodburn. 'In 1880, the ill-fated Marquis de Rays expedition of 340 hopeful migrants from Veneto, Italy, sailed to make a new home in New Ireland (now part of Papua New Guinea).

'Here they struggled against fever, starvation and the jungle, and many died. After four months the survivors made their way to Noumea and sought aid from the Government of New South Wales. The Premier, Sir Henry Parkes, arranged their safe transport. They reached Sydney on 7 th April, 1881. A number of them came to this place and built a happy and prosperous settlement, which was called "New Italy". Nothing now remains of their homes. But the quiet pride, the courage and strength of these Italian pioneers will always be remembered in this district with respect and gratitude.'

Woodburn has continued to be an important river port. However, as the importance of transportation along the Richmond River has declined, the town has become less important. Today it survives more because it is on the Pacific Highway and therefore is a stopover for travellers making their way from Sydney to Queensland.

For further information, see

www.walkabout.com.au/theage/fairfax/locations/NSWWoodburn.shtml

And,

www.richmondvalley.nsw.gov.au/tourism/wburn.html

And,

www.richmondnet.com.au/

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 03.05.2004

American Bar - George Sklavos - Brisbane, circa 1916.

From, Denis A. Conomos, The Greeks in Queensland. A History from 1859-1945. 2002.
p. 119.

"In about 1912, the Kytherian, George Sklavos, opened the American Milk Bar at 276-278 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley, having apparently spent some time in America and observed the latest milk bar developments there.

His shop was one of the most modern of its type at the time, and it became a model which many of its owner's compatriots were to copy. A modern version of the old 'refreshment rooms', it sold the usual pies, sandwiches, cakes, hot beverages and confectionery, but with the help of the new milk-bat technolgy, it was able to offer more. Malted milks, freshly made fruit drinks, ice-cream sodas and sundaes became important new items on the menu.

Customers either stood at the counter to be served, or sat at the tables, which seated more than one hundred people.

There was a staff of about fifteen, both males and females.

Panagiotis Dimitris Feros (Peter Feros), who worked there in 1915, has descibed the shop as having 'every facility known to the game then.'"

This same photograph of George Sklavos's "American Bar" can also be viewed on page 112 of, Denis A. Conomos, The Greeks in Queensland. A History from 1859-1945. 2002.



Copies of Denis's books are available from the Kytherian Association of Australia, and, from George Poulos, who, amongst other things, is a current Committee Member of the Association. (2004).


To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island.....

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 02.05.2004

Bega - 1950's - Greek cafe owner preparing wood for use in the kitchen.

Greek cafe owner preparing wood for use in the kitchen.

Photograph taken in Bega, NSW, circa 1950s.

The cafe owner has not been identified.

Can anyone help to identify him?


To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island.....

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 02.05.2004

Dorrigo Hotel - 1924 - Kytherian owned

The Kytherian owned Dorrigo Hotel, 1924.

The individuals have not been identified.

Can anyone help fill in the history of these Kytherians?

The history of Kytherian ownership of the Dorrigo Hotel has not been recounted to date.

Can anyone inform us of this history?


To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island.....

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 02.05.2004

Helen Calligeros (nee, Coroneos) - Dubbo, NSW - Karavas - Kythera

The following article appeared in the Dubbo Liberal Newspaper in October, 2003.

[Dubbo is situated in the geographic centre of the state of New South Wales.

Dubbo ia one of the fastest growing inland cities in Australia.

The increasing importance of Dubbo is reflected in its population growth over the past 30 years from 12,000 in 1954 to its current estimate of 38,000. The City has a strong reputation for its successful and innovative approach to the development of its economy.

As its many residents and visitors will testify, Dubbo is one of the State's most vibrant and progressive regional centres.

See,

http://www.dubbo.nsw.gov.au/

www.dubbo.nsw.gov.au/

www.dubbotourism.com.au/ ]


[Note: The above photograph is not the one that appeared in the original article.]



Helen Proud of her Heritage.

When Helen Calligeros came to Australia she may have been poor in terms of possessions, but she was rich in hoipe and determination to succeed.

Rachel Whitely reports.

An afternoon in the garden reminiscing with Helen Cakkigeros could almost make you believe you were sitting on the island of Kythera, in Greece, which she was born.
And while she is very proud of her Greek heritage she loves Australia.

Helen Calligeros arrived in Dubbo 50 years ago this year, and celebrated her 50th wedding anniversary on October 5; her husband George having passed away 15 years ago.

Arriving in the country in 1948 as a 15-year-old, her 14-year old brother Nick in tow, she brought with her many stories of the beautiful island where she was born, the people, the culture and, of course, the food.

"I was born on Kythera Island in Greece in 1933, as one of seven children," Helen reminisced. [In birth order, their anglicised names were Theo, Toula, Angie, Helen, Nick, Manuel, and Voula. Theo, Toula, Nick and Manuel are deceased.(G.C.P.) ]

Helen remembers World War II, and the invasion by Germans and Italians of her island. She recalls the hardships experienced, although she was young at the time.

In 1946, Helen's mother [Georgia (nee, Mentis)] died from complications during the birth of her eighth child, leaving her father to raise the brood.

"We came to Australia, sponsored by my uncle (Nick), who owned a cake shop in Blacktown," Helen said. "We came because we were poor, and my uncle could see a future for us in Australia."

"We arrived in Blacktown in the night time, about seven or eight. The next morning my uncle said to us 'go behind the counter and say yes please?'
The people would come in and we would say 'yes please', and they would point to what they would want."

The family remained in Blacktown for four years, and after three months, had learned the cake business.

"In 1952, I came to Dubbo for a Greek wedding," Helen said. THe wedding was between a local girl Audrey Dumbrell and John Calligeros, no relation to Helen, but also from Kythera Island. (However, another John Calligeros, also in Dubbo, was George's brother.)

"It was at that wedding that I met my husband George, who was a bootmaker here in Dubbo," Helen said.

The young couple were married three months later on the long weekend in October in the Church of England, by a Greek Orthodox priest, brought up from Sydney.

George had first worked at the California Cafe, now the site of Carrington Firearms in Talbragar Street, which was owned by George's brother-in-law, John Comino.
"We had the boot shop for six or seven years before we sold it and bought Fred Cunningham's fruit shop, also in Talbragar Street, in 1958," Helen said.

This was the time before supermarkets, and the pair worked very long hours.
"Dad would get up at 6am, and work until 9pm, seven days a week. The only day they had off was Christmas Day," explained Angela Calligeros, Helen's oldest child.
"They worked very hard like all the migrants had to in those days."

During this time their two chiuldren were born, Angela, and son Micheal, who both still live in Dubbo. [In 2004, Micheal moved to Canberra.]

Micheal..and wife Tracey (nee, Neeve - heritage English), have three teenage boys, who simply love their Yiayia (Greek for Grandma), while Angela, who is a legal secretary with Nelson, Keane and Hemingway, lives with her mother.

On June 6, 1961, Helen became a naturalised citizen, after being advised to do so in the lead-up to a visit to Greece.

"They suggested we be naturalised before returning to Greece for our trip, to avoid problems in returning to Australia," Helen said.

George died 15 years ago, and although Helen has toyed with the idea of leaving Dubbo, she is now adamant that this country - and city - is her home.

"I love my cooking, gardening, watching tennis,..I love to play bingo..and I love Australia," Helen said.


Helen's older sister, Envangalia - Angela or Angie; mentioned in the course of the article, is my mother.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 29.04.2004

Tenterfield, NSW, Australia - 1922 - Backyard of a Kytherian shop

Backyard of a Kytherian shop in Tenterfield in 1922.

The individuals have not been identified.

Can anyone help fill in the history of these Kytherians?



To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island....

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 29.04.2004

Gilgandra NSW - A Kytherian town - c. WWII-1975 - the Monterey Cafe

I was born in Gilgandra, in 1952, and left after completing my schooling in 1969.

From about the end of WWII, until mid-1975 - Gilgandra, population, 2,900 - was a very Kytherian town.

5 families - the Pentes, Sklavos, Kelly (Koumokellie), Psaltis (Protopsaltis), and Poulos (Tzortzopoulos) - lived in close proximity to each other - culturally, residentially, and commercially.

In the main, Kytherians embraced Kytherians - Gilgandra embraced Kytherians - and Kytherians embraced Gilgandra.

Gilgandrians have a very warm regard for Kytherians. On a recent visit to Gilgandra with my 88 year old father, Con Poulos; retired local plumber, Kevin Walton, on seeing "Con...nnië", rushed over and grabbed him, and kissed him on both cheeks. (I doubt whether Kevin treats his own wife with such affection.) This, despite the fact that they had not seen each other for 33 years.

I was not surprised therefore, when I ventured into the recently opened Cooee Heritage Centre in Gilgandra, to find a glass showcase, on an entire wall, devoted to displays derived from mostly Kytherian Cafes and Shops.

The photograph above is one of the displays of food utensils from the Monterey Cafe, Miller Street, Gilgandra.

The Monterey was owned by George Protopsaltis (Potamos) & Alexandra Protopsaltis (nee Feros) (from Mitata). Both are now deceased.

Before I was born, and when I was young, The Monterey had a large working kitchen - and sold meals at all hours. (Hence the utensils).

Later George and Alexandra opted for "quality of lifë" options - scaling back the restaurant and re-inventing the Monterey as a milk bar and snack shop.

I remember them both with deep affection.

If they were alive, I think both would be very proud of the Cooee Heritage Centre, and the Centre's tribute to them.


About the Cooee Heritage Centre

The Coo-ee Heritage Centre, Gilgandra's Cultural Heritage Centre, was constructed in 2001 and aims to harmoniously represent the cultures and lifestyles, past and present, of the people of the Gilgandra district in a setting conducive to providing education and entertainment.

The Centre demonstrates local major events of regional, state and national significance. Exhibitions include the Cooee March Collection, the Australian Collection and a plotted history of Gilgandra. The Centre is located on the banks of the Castlereagh River with the Gilgandra Visitor Centre.

The architectural design reflects Reconciliation with the Koori Gallery at one end, the European History Gallery at the other with a neutral exhibition space in the centre. The Centre features rammed earth walls and floors, corrugated iron and water tanks. It brings the two cultures together in a peaceful and artistic manner providing a truly enjoyable experience for all visitors.

The middle exhibition space features travelling exhibitions, local artists displays and themed presentations about Gilgandra district, so no two visits to the Centre should ever be the same.

The Gilgandra Visitor Centre is also located within the building. Another aspect of the complex is the Rural Museum, just 200 metres from the Visitor and Coo-ee Heritage Centre. The Rural Museum offers a peep into yesteryear with its vast collection of agricultural artifacts, historical buildings and fascinating stories. Just look for the huge windmill out the front on the Newell Highway. The Rural Museum is open weekends and school holidays between 10am and 4pm with admission being Adults $4 and children $2.

You may also wish to take a stroll into town along the 'Windmill Walk'. A beautiful avenue of trees and local windmills that meanders along the banks of the Castlereagh River towards the centre of town. There are picnic facilities right along the walk with cafes and service stations on the other side of the road offering a variety of snacks and meals.

The Centre is open to the public 7 days a week from 9am to 5pm. Admission is currently free while the displays are being finalised. Bus and school groups are welcome and are encouraged to make a booking at the Gilgandra Visitor Centre on (02) 68472045 or Email us. Local volunteer tour guides are also available.



Contact Details
Gilgandra Shire Council
Ph: (02) 6847 2709
Fax: (02) 6847 2521

council@gilgandra.nsw.gov.au

http://www.gilgandra.nsw.gov.au/heritagecentre.htm


You can take the boy out of Gilgandra .... but you can't take Gilgandra out of the boy.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 29.04.2004

Tenterfield, NSW - 1922 - Kytherian Cafe owner with his staff

Kytherian Cafe owner with his staff taken in Tenterfield, NSW, 1922.

The individuals have not been identified.

Can anyone help fill in the history of these Kytherians?



To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island...

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 29.04.2004

Tenterfield NSW - Kytherian owned Cafe - circa 1937/38.

Kytherian owned Cafe in Tenterfield NSW, Australia, circa 1937/38.

No history of this Shop has been provided.

Can anyone help fill in the history of this Shop?



To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island..

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 29.04.2004

Nicholas Aroney, Shop - Sydney 1916.

Nicholas Aroney came to Australia from Kytheria in 1902.

He was well known for his hospitality to new Kytherian arrivals.

Photograph cira Sydney 1916.

No history of this Shop has been provided.

Can anyone help fill in the history of this Shop?



To view a larger collection of photo's, including many Kytherian-Australian photo's go to

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/photographs/photos.htm


Thanks to Maria Hill, for allowing us to reproduce Kytherian photographs at kythera-island.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 30.04.2004

The Museums and Galleries Foundation of NSW (MGF) -

The Museums and Galleries Foundation of NSW (MGF) staged the -"Milkshakes, Sundaes and Cafe Culture" exhibition in various venues around New South Wales, Australia, in 2003-2004.

The photo above was taken at the Inverell Motor Museum exhibition, Inverell, NSW, in April 2004.

The woman standing in front of the display is Angelique(nee, Mitchell/Michaletos) Papadopoulos. She now lives in Wollongong, NSW.

Angelique was bought up in Inverell. Her father Steve (Stavros) Mitchell came to Australia c. 1922 from Neapolis. In 1933 he moved to Inverell, and established the Black and Green Bar in Otho Street.

The malt dispenser in the background is from the Black and Green Bar, and Angelique can recall using it to make "malted milkshakes", from the time she was old enough to serve in the cafe.

In the frame in the background is a pie bag from the Black and Green Bar.

A takeaway operates today (2004) on the corner where the Black and Green Bar used to operate.

The Greek Flag in the background, was sewn by Deanna Makarthis's (nee Psaros) mother.

Deanna's Mothers Maiden name was Phacheas (Fatseas).
Deanna's mother was Calliope Phacheas, born 1908, at Kurri Kurri NSW - her father was George Phacheas, and mother Sophia (nee, Defteron).

George arrived Australia 1901, and with brother Peter Phacheas and a nephew Alexander, settled in West Maitland. George returned to Smyrna 1904 and married Sophia Defteron, returning the same year. They established an oyster saloon in the newly ermerging town of Kurri Kurri, NSW, remaining there until c 1920, when they moved to 23 Renwick St Redfern - only about 100 metres from the Cathederal in Cleveland Street.

Only a small number of Fatseas's used the Phacheas translation, and are closely related. This name has been lost in Eastern Australia due to a lineage of daughters, and only a small group remain in Western Australia, which have evolved to Phaceas. [Information, Peter "Skoudladris" Makarthis, Inverell, Deanna's husband.]



For Information about the Museums and Galleries Foundation of NSW (MGF)

See,

http://www.mgfnsw.org.au/index.php

The Vision

A confident, dynamic and sustainable network of museums and galleries which contributes to the economic, social and cultural life of NSW.

Our Mission

To support the strategic position and relevance of museums and galleries

WHO WE ARE

The Museums and Galleries Foundation of NSW (MGF) was established in 1999 as the key service agency throughout NSW for the museum and gallery sector.

We support the work of museums, galleries, Keeping Places, contemporary art and craft spaces and artist-run galleries throughout NSW, in both regional and metropolitan areas.

MGF works with local, state and federal governments, tourism bodies, educational, arts and cultural organisations to promote the importance of museums and galleries to the community and ensure that the sector is aware of changing needs.

For the latest MGF news click on the following link, What's New,

http://www.mgfnsw.org.au/news/[001]news.php

For information pertaining to the services MGF provides click on the following link.

http://www.mgfnsw.org.au/services/[001]services.php


OVERVIEW 2003-2005

The MGF has developed a fully integrated approach for the next three years embracing:

Research - to develop sound data to inform activities and create appropriate services and fuel advocacy
Development activities - to provide training and professional development, programs which promote standards and to offer services such as the MGF-NETS touring exhibition service and
A program to foster sector connection - to broker stronger relationships within the sector and between the sector and government, particularly local government.
To achieve this we will focus on:

Best practice programs to raise standards
Access and audience development - ensuring community relevance and
Advocacy - raising awareness of sector value.

MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES SECTOR SUPPORT
Advice and Information

MGF offers advice and news on every aspect of museum and gallery work. For staff contact details refer to the last two pages of this document.

Advocacy and Research

MGF is continuing its strong program of research and planning to increase its advocacy activities in 2003. MGF has contributed and responded to a number of key reports related to the sector and its activities. Submissions and responses to the Report of the Inquiry into the Contemporary Visual Arts and Craft Sector and the report into the Future of the Heritage Collections Council among others have been lodged. Recent research projects have included Who Owns Museums (a survey covering issues related to museum collections management and ownership by Virginia Hollister), and research into gallery directors’ positions within local councils conducted by Peta Landman. Research and advocacy priorities for 2003 include volunteer succession, the significance of and valuing museum collections, promoting museums and galleries to the public and to local government.

Advisory Committees

MGF seeks specialist advice from a number of committees comprising representatives and specialists in the sector. These include: The Volunteer Reference Committee, NETS Advisory Committee, Programs Reference Committee, Access Reference Group and Pilot Accreditation Committee.

CONTACT US

Who to Contact

Museums and Galleries Foundations of NSW
43-51 Cowper Wharf Road, Woolloomooloo NSW 2011 AUSTRALIA
Telephone: +612 9358 1760,
Facsimile: +612 9358 1852,
Freecall 1800 114 311 (regional NSW)
email: mgfnsw@ozemail.com.au

FUNDING

MGF receives core funding from the NSW Government through the Ministry for the Arts, with additional funding from project grants.

The Museums and Galleries Foundation of NSW is assisted by the Commonwealth Government of Australia.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 29.04.2004

Inverell Motor Museum, Inverell NSW Australia

The massive Inverell Motor Museum, which housed the Museum and Galleries Foundation of NSW {see separate entry for details of the Foundation} -"Milkshakes, Sundaes and Cafe Culture" display in 2004. [See other entries in this category - "Cafes and Shops" - by Inverell businessman, and honorary Kytherian Peter Makarthis.]

A PDF format educational kit, about this display is avalaible to download at

http://mgfnsw.org.au/resources/Fact_Sheets/Education/CafEdKitsec.pdf

This is a very important and useful educational kit - and particularly relevant to all Kytherians.

The Museum is located on a large acreage on the outskirts of the town.

Originally built to house a snack food factory - the venture collapsed, prompting the Local Council to buy the building, and dedicate it as a Museum. This has proved a bonus to the cultural and civic "life" of Inverell.

Situated in North-Western New South Wales, the population of Inverell is c. 10,000, but it draws on a shopping/commercial population of about 30,000 people from neighbouring towns.