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Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

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Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by James Gavriles on 02.06.2004

inside the Plymouth Grille, Detroit, Mich.

Inside the Plymouth & Telegraph Grille.
My Uncle, Paul Panaretos on far left standing in the colored shirt.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by James Gavriles on 02.06.2004

Plymouth Grille, Detroit, Michigan, Paul Panaretos

Another picture of the Plymouth &Telegraph grille during the early 1940's. Owned by Paul Paneretos.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by James Gavriles on 02.06.2004

Plymouth Grille Detroit,Michigan

PLymouth and Telegraph Grille, owned by my Mother's brother, Paul Theo. Panaretos.
This particuliar restaurant burned down in the late 40's and was rebuilt into a larger and finer reataurant named "Pauls Steak House"

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by James Gavriles on 02.06.2004

Mary Panaretos Pappas

My Mother's sister Mary, in front of my Father's restaurant,Atlas Cafe, Highland Park, Michigan. She worked as a waitress for some time. This picture is around 1925

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 01.06.2004

Crethar's Cafe Lismore ~1935

Angelo Victor Crethar arrived from Ballina in 1923 and acquired the ‘Busy Bee Café’ of George Patrinos in Woodlark Street, revamping it into ‘Crethar’s Sundae Shop’ and trading as Crethar Bros in silent partnership with his brother Menas, who turned up from Tamworth in about 1925.
In 1926 Angelo also acquired a tearoom business in Molesworth Street, one shop up from Theo George Fardouly’s ‘Olympia Café’. Here he established another Sundae shop which became the ‘New Sundae Shop’ in 1929 and further evolved into ‘Crethars Café’ a year or so later when he acquired the shop next door and expanded his premises.
In 1927, the year electricity first came to Lismore, he opened a third Sundae Shop in Keen Street, trading as Crethar & Crethar, the second bloke believed to be Harry Nick Crethar.
In 1929 he took in Nick Angelo Crones as a partner in his Woodlark Street shop, allegedly divided off from the original one owned by he and Menas, and thereafter traded as Crethar & Crones from that outlet.
In about 1930 he took in Greg Jacob Londy as a partner and established the ‘Star Court Milk Bar’ in the arcade adjacent to the Theatre, just down from his Molesworth shop.
In 1935/36, sometime after selling out of the Keen Street business, he established the ‘Vogue Milk Bar’ adjacent to the newly built theatre on the river side of Molesworth, where he was again in partnership with Nick Crones.
In the meantime the elaborate Olympia had become a white elephant in the Depression shakeout, going belly up around 1930 and leaving a vacuum at the top end of the market. Angelo gradually crept into this upmarket niche in a series of small makeovers of his Molesworth shop. It’s believed the second storey was added around 1933 and by about 1935, when Lismore could again sustain a ritzy establishment, was Lismore’s leading restaurant, with salubrious café downstairs and posh eatery, with silver service, on top.
In 1939 it became the first air-conditioned business in the region and, naturally enough, was rechristened ‘Crethar’s Air-Conditioned Café’. Queues formed halfway down Molesworth Street during summer waiting to be accommodated. After the destruction of the 1945 flood the restaurant was again renovated and made even more opulent, becoming the favoured social venue of Lismore’s glitterati upon being awarded the North Coast’s first restaurant liquor licence in 1946.
He sold the business in 1956 and after about 10 years retirement in Lismore and Sydney settled in Ballina, where he died in 1974.

Angelo was a foundation member of the Lismore Rotary Club, a stalwart of the Golf Club (secretary-manager 1956 to 64) and became the defacto leader of the Northern Rivers Greek community through to about the end of the war. Thereafter he withdrew from community affairs and upon the reformation of ‘The Greek Community of Lismore’ in about 1948 his brother Eric became President, and remained as such for 4yrs until passing the baton to Leo Manias, who in turn passed it to Charlie Anthony Sourry who wore the mantle until 1970 when the organization folded. Eric’s son, ‘Young Harry’ Crethar, is now the Defacto General of the remaining Northern Rivers Greeks.

At the beginning of the war Angelo organised the North Coast Greeks to contribute liberally to a fund to purchase a fighter aircraft for the Commonwealth and upon the invasion of Greece was instrumental in setting up other funds for the Greek war effort. One such meeting at his café in late 1940 raised £210 within minutes for ‘The Central Greek War Relief Fund’ and a permanent committee, consisting of Peter Manias, Nick Crones, Len Sargent and Lou Katsaros, was formed to raise and administer further collections. A couple of weeks later he was the keynote speaker at a function hosted by Murwillumbah Rotary at which he amazed everyone by using some contraption called an epidiascope to outline the history of Greece and the progress of the war. He was well supported at the function by a large contingent of Greeks from all over the Tweed, Brunswick and Richmond districts. It was probably he who instigated and organised the post war visit and civic reception for Peter George Poulos of Katoomba and Anagyros Stratigos, the Greek Government envoy, in the quest to personally call upon each of the next-of-kin of North Coast soldiers buried in Greece.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 04.06.2004

Regent Cafe Lismore ~1938

L to R
1. Harry John Crethar or Harry Nick Crethar. Former was in Lismore until ~ 1930 and then moved to Deepwater and/or Emmaville. Returned Kythera ~1935 and came back to settle Tenterfield ~1937. Latter landed 1914 and spent time Dungog, Ballina, Coraki before coming to Lismore and allegedly acquiring Regent café in Keen St late 1920s from Nick Poulos. Sold to Harry James Crethar early 1930s and disappeared somewhere.
2. Spyro George Tsicalas. (Chief debt collector. Kept a bike chain under the cash register as an aid in persuading recalcitrant drunks to pay up. The Regent had a captive clientele from the 4 pubs in the vicinity.)
3. Nick James Crethar. (Initally a partner with brother Harry in Regent until acquiring Woodlark St café of Stathis & Cassimaty 1939. Moved Casino ~1947)
4. Jean Brown, Ruby Green, Nellie Mules
5. Harry James Crethar. (Landed 1922 with Peter Nick Crethar and initially went to Glen Innes before both came to Lismore late 1920s. Peter Nick, who had Monterey Café further down Keen St, believed to be unconnected to Harry Nick above. Harry James sold Regent to Veniamin Gialouris ~1945 and acquired Golden Globe café Molesworth St.)

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 31.05.2004

Bingara's Roxy Theatre - Officially re-opened

Back to the flicks after a 36-year intermission.

Mark Coultan.

Sydney Morning Herald. Monday, May 31, 2004. page 3.

The opening of Bingara's Roxy Theatre in the Depression years must have seemed a symbol of a great future for the small town in north-western NSW. In fact, it was a folly - a glorious one, but one nevertheless doomed to failure.

Now the Roxy has reopened, and the theatre is again the hope of the town.

Alex Cross, [a local of the town], was 14 when the Roxy opened. "All during my school days we used to come here of an evening."

Admission was sixpence, and the treat was a Big Penny ice-cream. Westerns and Popeye cartoons were the staple fare.

"There wasn't much love stories in those days." So did he bring girlfriends to the Roxy? "I wasn't a lover", he said, adding that he came with his sisters.

But the Roxy struggled, battling for patronage against the REgent Cinema down the road, which had better access to Hollywood movies, and closed in 1958.

THe last Jaffa rolled down the aisle as television was coming to Australia. The Roxy's art deco beauty was largely hidden behind a cafe.

In 1999 the council bought it, with the help of a $100,000 grant from the NSW Government. The interior remained remarkably intact. But is still required $300,000 of the council's money and grants from the federal and NSW governments to restore the ornate plasterwork and original paint finishes and to build a new backstage area.

It's one of a number of country cinema's reopening, thanks to government funding and a new business model which relies on government restoration grants, council ownerships and support and volunteer workers.

The Roxy is now the home of the North West Theatre company and regional theatre performance course.

John Wearne was mayor when the council bought the building.

"A community our size can go in two different directions," he said.
"Thet can lie down and die and be negative and complain....or they can be progressive, look forward and play to their strengths."

"We have done all that. We examined tourism as a way out for us and I'd say when a small community like Bingara stops having a project like the Roxy, it's the beginning of the end."

Bob Carr [Premier of the State of New South Wales] came to Bingara at the weekend, the first premier the town has seen in a generation, to officially open the Roxy and see a showcase of regional talent.

He also announced another grant, this one to replace the roof and provide insulation.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 29.05.2004

Roxy Theatre - Bingara NSW Australia Official Opening 29 May 2004

Hon.Bob Carr MP Premier of New South Wales and Senator Sandy Macdonald representative for the Minister for Transport and Regional Services unveil the plaque at the Official opening of the Roxy Theatre at Bingara NSW Australia Saturday 29 May 2004. Premier Carr and Senator Macdonald were generous in their tribute to the Greeks who established the theatre complex in 1936

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 27.05.2004

Molong Cafe

Original Molong Cafe of Capitan-Minas Poulos (Tzortzopoulos), and other Kytherian owners.

A symbol of the decline of Kytherian and Hellenic influence in the retail trade - central western New South Wales.

The shop is not trading - with newspapers lining the window.

I am certain that many persons in Australia have many photographs of this shop from the 1920's onwards, when it was a thriving cafe, with a great reputation, which spread well beyond the borders of the small town of Molong.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 27.05.2004

Andronicus Olympia cafe at Allora

Andronicus Olympia cafe at Allora

Does anyone know the history of the Andronicus's who owned the Olympia Cafe?


About Allora:

A quiet service centre in the Darling Downs.
161 km south-west of Brisbane, 58 km from Toowoomba and 467 m above sea level, Allora is known as the 'best little town on the Downs'. Its name is probably a corruption of the Aboriginal word 'gnallorah' meaning 'swampy place'. If it is accurate translation it would be an apt description for this pleasant little town which is located at the point where the New England Highway crosses Dalrymple Creek.

The area around the present-day site of Allora was first explored by Europeans in the early 1840s. Grazier Patrick Leslie moved into the area in 1840-1841 with a stud of combined merino and German sheep.

The area gained in importance when the government of New South Wales decided to establish the town as an outpost. In 1859 the site was surveyed and became a municipality a decade later. The town prospered as a service centre for the agriculturally rich surrounding districts and as a stopover point for the itinerant workers who travelled through the area en route from Warwick to Toowoomba. Its chances of ever becoming a major centre disappeared when the Toowoomba - Warwick railway bypassed the town.

See,

http://www.walkabout.com.au/fairfax/locations/QLDAllora.shtml

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 27.05.2004

Margies Candies - Chicago, USA - Poulos's

Margies Candies

Margie’s Candies ice cream parlor, 1960 N. Western Ave, was founded in the 1920s by Greek immigrant Peter George Poulos.

It later expanded to include chocolate and other sweets which it manufactures on behalf of other companies. From the beginning, Margie’s candy, ice cream, and fudge sauce have been homemade.

It was the homemade fudge sauce, poured over 18 percent butterfat ice cream, that attracted the Beatles after their concert in Comiskey Park.

The shop is today operated by Peter Poulos Jr.

Placed on the www by the Chicago Department of Planning and Development.

See,

http://www.ci.chi.il.us/PlanAndDevelop/MadeInChicago/Margies.html

Can anyone, particularly those from Chicago, USA, tell us more about Peter George Poulos or Peter Poulos Jnr, or Margies Candies?

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 23.05.2004

Murgon 1938

Murgon’s Mason fraternity. George Black on the throne and Danny Vanarey in the chair far left.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 23.05.2004

Murgon ~1936

Theo Peter Comino arrived in town around 1930 and acquired the Blue Bird café across the road from George Black, remaining into the late 1940s. Read all about his war time fun and games at Murgon in ‘The Greeks of Queensland’ by Denis Conomos.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 23.05.2004

Murgon ~1929

My wife, a true-blue Murgon girl, has this and the following Murgon photos in her inherited collection. She reckons Danny Vanarey was the first to bring Greek cooking to Murgon in 1921 when he took up one of the new suite of shops built by a bloke named Carrodus (is this Greek?). A couple of years later George Black arrived to give him a few pointers, taking over the business in 1927 when Danny decided his talents lay as a draper in the adjacent shop.
In 1932 they went into partnership to buy the freehold of the 4 shops and Carrodus’ private residence in the street behind - where George lived. (Danny had a separate large house and grounds nearby, which became Murgon’s favoured venue for garden parties over many years.)
George passed the cafe to his nephew Peter Lahanas in the late 1950s and established a newsagency in his shop next door, creating a Greek Quarter in Murgon’s CBD.
George and Danny retired in about 1970 and returned to Kythera, but Danny couldn’t handle the plumbing and came back shortly afterwards.
[George’s brother Jack had a café up the road at Goomeri (See photo at the State Library of QLD photo site.) Jack died in 1947 and his sons Jim and Manuel took over the business. His other sons, Zachary (Jack) and George, stayed with uncle George for a while before moving off to Casino to work for their uncle Tony Calopades, subsequently buying the business.]
Peter Lahanas sold up in about 1975, so ending Murgon’s Greek adventure, but his home made pineapple crush is still talked about. (Psst: Susan taught his daughter at Murgon Primary and many years later they serendipitously found themselves sharing a Uni class – ‘a lovely girl’ she has just called out. That’ll cost.)

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Giannis Cassimatis on 14.05.2004

Cassimatis Tobacco shop USA

right to left: Panagiotis, Andreas, Theodoros and Nikos Cassimatis infront of their tobacco shop in America.

(see a chapter of Cassimatis family history in the oral history section.)

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 12.05.2004

The Townhouse. The Lobby. Childhood home of Lafcadio Hearn in 2004

The Townhouse. The Lobby.

Childhood home of Lafcadio Hearn in 2004

Established in 1978 The Townhouse has a long standing commitment to the comfort of our guests. The Townhouse offers you a unique range of bed and breakfast accomodation in a relaxing, comfortable and friendly atmosphere.

The original Townhouses were the elegant family homes of two famous playwrights - Dion Boucicault (1829 - 1890) and Lafcadio Hearn (1850 - 1904).

Their memories have been honoured by displays in the lobby of memorabilia, photographs and original playbills.

Both men had colorful and singular lives - their histories are re-counted in full in the lobby.

Each bedroom is named after one of their works.

1997 saw the addition of The Townhouse Mews - a new wing in a beautiful minimalist style - oak wooden floors, designer furniture, elegant simplicity. It is alternative and complimentary to the Georgian buildings of The Townhouse.

The Townhouse is located in the heart of historic Dublin, a short walk from the leafy Trinity College (the second oldest university in Europe), the fashionable shopping streets, the Temple Barleft bank, the International Financial Services Centre, the Point Depot, museums, art galleries and a myriad of pubs and restaurants.

It is just 100m from the Central Bus and Airport Coach Station and 200m from mainline rail and dart stations.

The Townhouse, 47- 48 Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin 1, Ireland
Telephone: +353 1 8788808 Fax:+ 353 1 8788787 email: info@townhouseofdublin.com.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 12.05.2004

The Townhouse. Dublin, Ireland. Childhood home of Lafcadio Hearn in 2004

The Townhouse. Exterior.

Childhood home of Lafcadio Hearn as it exists in 2004

Established in 1978 The Townhouse has a long standing commitment to the comfort of our guests. The Townhouse offers you a unique range of bed and breakfast accomodation in a relaxing, comfortable and friendly atmosphere.

The original Townhouses were the elegant family homes of two famous playwrights - Dion Boucicault (1829 - 1890) and Lafcadio Hearn (1850 - 1904).

Their memories have been honoured by displays in the lobby of memorabilia, photographs and original playbills.

Both men had colorful and singular lives - their histories are re-counted in full in the lobby.

Each bedroom is named after one of their works.

1997 saw the addition of The Townhouse Mews - a new wing in a beautiful minimalist style - oak wooden floors, designer furniture, elegant simplicity. It is alternative and complimentary to the Georgian buildings of The Townhouse.

The Townhouse is located in the heart of historic Dublin, a short walk from the leafy Trinity College (the second oldest university in Europe), the fashionable shopping streets, the Temple Barleft bank, the International Financial Services Centre, the Point Depot, museums, art galleries and a myriad of pubs and restaurants.

It is just 100m from the Central Bus and Airport Coach Station and 200m from mainline rail and dart stations.

The Townhouse, 47- 48 Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin 1, Ireland
Telephone: +353 1 8788808 Fax:+ 353 1 8788787 email: info@townhouseofdublin.com

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 13.05.2004

Plaque presented to Panayoti Zantiotis by the Gunnedah Shire Council

Plaque presented to Panayoti Zantiotis by the Gunnedah Shire Council, resting on a laminate table top at the Busy Bee Cafe.

The Inscription reads:

"Peter Zantiotis

The late Peter Zantiotos was a marvellous contributor to the fabric and culture of the Gunnedah business community over a 60 year period.

As a teenager, Peter Zantiotis joined his father in the Busy Bee Cafe and on March 15 1936, making the long passage by ship from the Greek island of Kythera, in the Ionian Sea, by himself.

Apart from one return trip to Greece, he spent almost every day of his life in the cafe, until his death in early 1996.

Generations of families have made the Busy Bee a stopping-point during their shopping days in Gunnedah, and "Mr Zantiotis", as he was known to scores of children, was remembered for his kindness and generosity.

His dedication to his family and business were without peer, as was his contribution to business in Conadilly Street, over six decades.

A warm and generous representative of his ancestry, and a proud Australian, Peter Zantiotis will long be remembered in Gunnedah."


The trophy holds pride of place in Theodora - "Loula's" - 'office' at the rear of the Busy Bee Cafe.

My mother would say - "to cumaroni" - Loula holds it dear to herself - as a mother holds her baby. She is very, very proud of it

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 11.05.2004

Canberra Dining Rooms - Queanbeyan NSW -Megali Kythera

Potiri Bros Canberra Dining Rooms in Queanbeyan NSW Australia c 1916. Second from right is Theo Psaros. Can any one identify the other men?

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 13.11.2009

I Zoi En Afstralia - Life in Australia - panel at exhibition

I Zoi En Afstralia - Life in Australia - panel at exhibition

Outlining the story behind this marvellous book, published in 1916; chronicling the lives of many of the Greek-Australiam cafe and shop-owners in Australia at the time.

Museums and Galleries Foundation of NSW staged the Milkshakes, Sundaes and Cafe Culture exhibition in various venues around New South Wales, Australia, in 2003-2004.

The travelling exhibition enhanced Australian consciousness about the importance of the book Life in Australia.

Download .pdf of the original artwork for the banner here:

M&G_PANEL_Life _in _Aus.pdf