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Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

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Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 14.06.2004

Paragon Cafe, Katoomba, NSW - view looking into store with water fountain display on the left

The Paragon Cafe, Katoomba, NSW, Australia is a 20th century, Kytherian cafe "time capsule".

Note:

1. The Simos photo gallery surrounding the upper part of the store.

2. The original glass counters.

3. Original chandeliers.

4. Original ceilings.

5. Fine woodwork and craftsmanship.

6. How incredibly busy it is. On the day I attended all tables were full, at all times.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 14.06.2004

Paragon Cafe, Katoomba, NSW - original milkshake makers, metal milkshake containers, and sundae glasses - in situ, 2004

The Paragon Cafe, Katoomba, NSW, Australia is a 20th century, Kytherian cafe "time capsule".

Paragon Cafe, Katoomba, NSW - original milkshake makers, metal milkshake containers, and sundae glasses - in situ, 2004

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 14.06.2004

Paragon Cafe, Katoomba, NSW, Australia -

The Paragon Cafe, Katoomba, NSW, Australia is a 20th century, Kytherian cafe "time capsule".

"Penny" Vending Machine, surrounded by film posters, in situ, 2004.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 14.06.2004

Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW, Australia - Walls and Screen surround with speakers

For more background on the Saraton Theatre - see entry; "Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW, Australia - Looking to the stage - the World Heritage stage?"

Photograph from website at:

http://www.nsw.nationaltrust.org.au/saraton2.html

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 14.06.2004

Saraton Theatre - Grafton, NSW, Australia - refurbished walls

For more information on the Saraton Theatre - see entry; "Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW, Australia - Looking to the stage - the World Heritage stage?"

Photograph from website at:

http://www.nsw.nationaltrust.org.au/saraton2.html

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 14.06.2004

Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW, Australia - Looking to rear entry into theatre

For more information on the Saraton Theatre - see entry; "Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW, Australia - Looking to the stage - the World Heritage stage?"

Photograph from website at:

http://www.nsw.nationaltrust.org.au/saraton2.html

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 14.06.2004

Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW, Australia - Foyer

For more information on the Saraton Theatre - see entry; "Saraton Theatre - Looking to the stage - the World Heritage stage?"

Photograph from website at:

http://www.nsw.nationaltrust.org.au/saraton2.html

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 29.09.2004

Saraton Theatre, Grafton, NSW, Australia - Looking to the stage - the World Heritage stage?

From:

http://www.nsw.nationaltrust.org.au/saraton2.html

NATIONAL TRUST REGISTER
Approved and entered 24th November 1999

GRAFTON Saraton Theatre
95 Prince Street

OWNER: Notaras Bros Pty Ltd c/- Mr Angelo Notaras PO Box 513 Rozelle NSW 2039

LESSEE: Irene Notaras PO Box 82 Woollahra NSW 2025

LGA: Grafton City Council
PO Box 24
Grafton NSW 2460

AUTHOR: L. Murray

PROPONENT: Graham Quint, Senior Conservation Officer
National Trust of Australia (NSW)

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Baynes, Dana (1999) "Shaky Saraton: Council clears way for demise", The Daily Examiner - Grafton, 20 April 1999.

Baynes, Dana (1999) "Saraton saved", The Daily Examiner - Grafton, 18 May 1999.

Thorne, Ross, Les Tod & Kevin Cork (1983) Theatres and Cinemas In NSW. Stage 2 - Investigation of types of new uses for which theatre buildings have been successfully adapted. Sydney: Heritage Council of New South Wales

Thorne, Ross, Les Tod & Kevin Cork (1996) Movie Theatre Heritage Register for New South Wales 18,96-1996, Sydney: Department of Architecture, University of Sydney. A National Estate Project for the Heritage Office (NSW) and the Australian Heritage Commission.

Tod, Les (1999) Saraton Theatre Submission to NSW Heritage Office, including research notes, 24 May 1999.

STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

The Saraton Theatre, 95 Prince Street Grafton, is a fine intact example of a two-level cinema built in 1926 and internally remodelled in 1940. The Saraton Theatre is of state significance as a rare surviving example of a two-level cinema, which is still operating. The Saraton is still under the management of the Notaras family, who built the theatre in 1926. The Saraton has featured prominently in the social lives of the community, being the first theatre built in Grafton, and continues to entertain the community as the town's only cinema. The Saraton Theatre is a major streetscape element along Prince Street, forming the centre piece of a row of two storey shops in a modified Spanish styling.

HISTORY

The Saraton Theatre was designed by Lismore architect F J Board, for the Notaras family. The builder was Mr Walters. The Mayor of Grafton, Ald W T Robinson, opened the Saraton Theatre on 17 July 1926. (Tod) The Saraton was the first theatre to be built in Grafton. ("Shaky Saraton")

The lessee of the theatre was T J Dorgan Pty Ltd, who organised a film circuit of far north coast cinemas. Dorgan also managed the Regent Theatre at Murwillumbah (operating, but adapted); Roxy Theatre at Kyogle (operating); Fitzroy Open Air at Coffs Harbour (demolished); and the Star Court Theatre, Lismore (operating - live theatre). (Thorne et al 1996, Tod)

The Notaras family was, and continues to be, a prominent family in Grafton. They operated a fruitshop in Grafton, adding a restaurant and milkbar later on. The nomenclature of the theatre illustrates the family interests - Saraton is the reversal of Notaras. (Tod) The theatre is still owned by the family.

During its turbulent history, the Saraton Theatre has experienced three fires. On 20 August 1932 the Saraton Theatre was damaged by fire. The picture screen, stage tab and curtains, baffle board, roof rafters and flooring of the stage were damaged. The Theatre remained closed as a cinema for the next eight years, however occasional dances, concerts and other social functions were still held in the theatre. (Tod)

In July 1940 the Saraton was renovated and remodelled internally by Queensland theatre architect George Rae. The result was an auditorium in the art moderne style. The Saraton suffered a second fire on 10 May 1944. The curtain and screen were destroyed, but the cinema was back in operation by late June 1944. (Tod)

Dorgan continued running the theatre until the early 1960s, when North Coast Theatres and Drive-Ins took over. (Thorne et al) The Saraton was closed in the mid 1960s. Family member Irene Notaras, after extensive renovations, reopened the theatre on 10 December 1982.

The Saraton Theatre suffered a third fire - on 13 January 1989. An employee was charged with setting fire to the projection box. However, the cinema was closed for less than a month.

More recently development and demolition proposals have threatened the Saraton Theatre. The site of the theatre was proposed for a carpark in April 1999 ("Shaky Saraton"), but the placing of an interim conservation order on the theatre stayed these plans. ("Saraton saved")

DESCRIPTION

The Saraton Theatre has been described by Ross Thorne et al as "one of the most decorative and architecturally handsome in NSW". (1996) The exterior of the Saraton Theatre is built in a modified Spanish styling. The theatre presents a unified street architecture that makes an important contribution to the streetscape. The street frontage consists of the theatre entrance, a shop on one side, and three shops on the other side, together forming a unified whole. The theatre auditorium is set back from the street. (Thorne et al 1983) The site occupies a frontage to Princes Street of 75 feet and has a depth of 160 feet. (Tod) The shops and theatre are of the same design, being two storey, with the upper-floor above the awning featuring flat arches and a stepped art-deco keystone design over the windows. There are two twelve pane windows above each shop, and three above the theatre. The entrance and upper storey of the theatre are rendered and painted to signify the different use of the building. The brickwork above the shops is orange-red faced. The auditorium features a central pediment under which is a hipped bio box projecting, and two horizontal entablatures with cornices below which are arches outlined. (Thorne et al 1983)

The interior was originally quite austere with little decoration and exposed roof trussess. The Daily Examiner in Grafton described the Saraton at its opening as follows:

"The main entrance to the building is through a spacious vestibule, at the far end of which are two wide doors giving access to the stalls. Seating accommodation has been provided for 720 persons. The main auditorium, however, is capable of seating 1,100 people, but the management have left vacant a space, which could be utilised for dancing, and in which it is possible to place an additional 300 seats. ... From the centre of the entrance vestibule, access is provided to concrete stairs, leading to an intermediate floor, or flyer, 53 ft x 12 ft, thence to the large gallery, in which are 429 comfortable seats." (Tod)

Following the fire in 1932, the interior was remodelled in 1940 in a moderne style. The auditorium had "a rectangular proscenium opening, crowned by stepped fluted panelling in gold, with three recessed panels flanking the proscenium on each side, decorated with modern mouldings. There were large wall friezes along the auditorium walls, featuring oval patterns. The foyers were also remodelled and fitted out with furnishings of the period." (Tod)

The Saraton Theatre is of state significance as a rare surviving example of a two- level cinema, which is still operating.

The Saraton Theatre is identified as a category 1 item in the NSW Heritage Office's Movie Theatre Register for NSW 1896-1996 and is included within the Royal Australian Institute of Architects' Register of Buildings of 20th Century Significance.


Trivia quiz: How did the Saraton Theatre get its name?

Clue: Carefully peruse the name of its owners?

Answer: In the COMMENTS box below, if you know/can work it out.


For information about Grafton, "The Jacaranda City", go to:

http://www.nnsw.com.au/grafton/index.html


Location and History of Grafton:

"Substantial and attractive town on the NSW North Coast
Grafton has a very beautiful and very gracious city centre characterised by wide streets, elegant Victorian buildings, a superb location on the banks of the Clarence River, a sense of solidity, and a long-standing concern with civic beauty, manifest in the 6500 trees and 24 parks which adorn the city. In fact, the first ornamental trees were planted as early as 1874 and the city's famous jacaranda stands in 1907-08.

Grafton is located about 40 km due west of the coast and 625 km north-east of Sydney at the junction of the Pacific and Gwydir Highways. The city is bisected by the Clarence River which, for many years, proved a barrier to the connection of the city centre (on the northern bank) with Sydney.

The Clarence (known to Europeans as the 'Big River' until 1840), with its tributaries - the Nymboida, the Orara, the Mann and the Coldstream - constitutes the largest river system on the northern NSW coast. Draining over two million hectares it contains over 100 islands, including Susan Island which lies between Grafton and South Grafton.

With a population of 18 500, Grafton is the major settlement on the Clarence River and the commercial centre of an extensive agricultural and pastoral district. The fertile river flats have encouraged dairying, sugarcane plantations and mixed farming. Fishing, the raising of pigs and cattle, the processing and marketing of primary produce and engineering are also important.

The area was occupied by the Gumbaingirr Aborigines at the time of European colonisation. It is thought that the first whites in the area were convict escapees from Moreton Bay who passed through the area in the late 1820s and early 1830s. One of their number, Richard Craig, reported a big river and a plenitude of valuable timber when he arrived at Port Macquarie in 1832. He was later employed by a Thomas Small of Sydney who, inspired by Craig's reports, sent off his brother and two dozen sawyers on board the schooner, the Susan, to the 'Big River'. It was the first European vessel to enter the river. Other cedar-cutters followed in their wake. Small took up a large parcel of land on Woodford Island, opening the way for other pastoralists along the river that Governor Gipps named the Clarence in 1839.

A store and shipyard were established, on what is now South Grafton in 1839 and shipbuilding would remain a major local industry until the end of the century when the railways began to dominate internal trade.

A wharf, store and inn adorned the northern bank by the early 1840s . Until 1861, when a punt service commenced, the only interaction between the two settlements was by row-boat. This area was known collectively and imaginatively as 'The Settlement'.

Twenty establishments were listed on the Clarence River in 1841. The district was surveyed in 1843 and a police magistrate appointed in 1846, at which time the population was recorded as 120.

A township was laid out in 1849 and named after the Duke of Grafton who was the grandfather of Governor Fitzroy. The first land sale took place in the early 1850s, a school opened in 1852 and the first Anglican church in 1854. The population, by 1856, had grown to 1069.

Wharves were established in the 1850s and Grafton benefited both from its location on the main coastal road to the north and from gold discoveries on the upper Clarence River. It soon became the major town on the Clarence and was declared a municipality in 1859. That same year, Grafton became home to both the Clarence and Richmond River Examiner and the first National School north of the Hunter River.

Sugar-growing commenced in the 1860s but dairying ultimately proved more successful. Development was further stimulated by the commencement of selection in the 1860s. A steam-driven vehicular ferry was established at this time.

Grafton was declared a city in the mid-1880s, by which time its population had surpassed 4000. The arrival of the railway at Glen Innes in 1883 and the completion of the Casino to North Grafton line in 1905, contributed to a slow decline in Grafton's importance as a regional port although the river trade chugged along until the 1950s.

In 1897 South Grafton established itself as a separate municipality and the two settlements were not amalgamated until 1956. This separation must have been due, in part, to the absence of a bridge. Remarkably, this situation was not rectified until 1932. It is even more remarkable when one considers that the rolling-stock of the Sydney-Brisbane railway (which reached South Grafton in 1915) had to be ferried across until that time. Still, when it did arrive it was a most unique construction, consisting of two storeys with the railway running underneath the road. It was, furthermore, a lift bridge, although the decline of the river trade saw the lift section sealed.

Poet Henry Kendall lived here as a child until 1852, only to return in the early 1860s when he worked as a clerk for solicitor and fellow-poet J.L. Michael who drowned in the river in 1868. The founder of the Country Party, Earle Page, was born at Grafton in 1880.

The Grafton Jazz and Blues Festival is held at Easter and the week-long Jacaranda Festival commences on the last Saturday of October, culminating in a street parade the following weekend. Community markets are held on the last Saturday of each month at the Alumny Creek Reserve, just out of Grafton on the Southgate Rd."

For a map of Grafton and surrounding towns, as well as maps placing the town in a NSW context go to:

http://www.nnsw.com.au/grafton/district_map.html

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 29.09.2004

Bingara - Roxy Theatre - magnificently restored - Kevin James Cork's Thesis

Some of the early history of the Roxy Theatre has been recounted by the (late) Kevin James Cork, a great phillhellene, and phillekytherian, in his unpublished MA Thesis, University of Western Sydney.

You are going to hear a lot about Kevin Cork, and his cinematic research, at kythera-family.net.

Writing in the 1990's, about Cinemas's that needed to be preserved in Australia. no 4. was the Roxy Theatre at Bingara.

*******************************************************************************

From Kevin Cork's unpublished MA Thesis, University of Western Sydney.

"Chapter 5: Parthenons Down Under.

4. Roxy Theatre, Bingara,

In Maitland Street, Bingara, near the corner of Cunningham Street, stands the 480-seat Art Deco -style Roxy. It was not built without difficulties and it was never the success its originators hoped. George Psaltis, Emanuel Aroney and Peter Feros
...purchased a block of buildings in Maitland Street, Bingara, consisting of premises occupied by them as Refreshment rooms, and three other shops adjoining.

It is the firms[sic] intention of demolishing the existing buildings, and to replace them by modern and up to date premises. The work of demolishing that part of the buildings occupied by them as refreshment rooms is now in hand, and the building of modern premises will be proceeded with, the rebuilding of the shops will follow later.

Mr Psaltis informed me that he intends to erect a modern and up to date Picture Theatre...

The development was announced in June 1934 in the local Bingara newspaper. Plans for the shops and theatre received favourable comment. "When completed it will have an equal frontage to both streets, a symmetrical and well-balanced building, a splendid addition to the town's business houses." The architect for the cinema was W V E Woodforde of Sydney and construction of the cinema commenced in early 1935. It was subject to a number of alterations (believed to have been instigated by Psaltis) that resulted in extra time and expense. One of the alterations was to heighten the auditorium walls by 4 feet 6 inches to allow for the possible later inclusion of a dress circle. This brought about changes in decorative treatments of the main ceiling and proscenium.

It was not until the following year that the theatre opened.
Probably no event in the history of Bingara has caused more interest and excitement than the opening of the new Roxy Theatre, which took place on Saturday night last. The crowds which stormed the streets in the vicinity of the theatre...and long before the opening time, it was impossible to wend one's way through the crowd in front of the main entrance.

While its exterior is a basic rectangular interpretation of the Art Deco style, with pilasters and entablature and simple panelling to break up its cement-rendered wall surface, the interior is something different. Entry to the auditorium is through a long, narrow vestibule, the ticket box being situated in the middle at street entry (typical of USA cinemas). A short flight of steps leads up to the auditorium entry doors. The rear section of the auditorium is stepped and seating is fixed, whereas the front section is flat (for dances) and seating is moveable.

The auditorium decoration repeats the stepped motif of the facade, the ceiling stepping down to meet the walls at an entablature seemingly supported by pilasters. A wavy Art Deco frieze on the entablature and the perforated panels between the pilasters contrast with the angular theme. The wall panels comprise two elements, a central vertical row of five perforated, fan-like elements on each side of which are a vertical row of six rectangles containing diagonal strapping. The light fittings on the pilasters and proscenium splays are designed as angular vase elements. For Bingara, the Roxy is truly the "Theatre Moderne" (its advertised sub-title).

Reporting the opening performance on Saturday, 28 March 1936, the local newspaper said,
Great admiration was expressed at the beauty of the interior features of the theatre, and the wonderful coloured atmospheric lighting is certainly an innovation to Bingara. Changing from a soft white light to the effect of a rosy sunrise, the theatre gradually faded into soft blue lighting and the show was on.

And, the local mayor
...congratulated the management on their enterprise, saying that the theatre was a monument to the town and one of the finest buildings of its kind outside the city...Mr George Psaltis...received a flattering reception. He said it was the proudest moment of his life...He expressed...his appreciation of the support of the people of Bingara and district, whose friendship and encouragement had given them the inspiration to carry on in the face of all the obstacles that had beset them. They were but the servants of the people and they were out to give them the utmost value for their money, both in entertainment and service."


How inspiring it is that the dream of a fully restored Roxy Theatre has been realised.

Thank you, Kevin Cork, for your part in its restoration.


Kevin Cork is also the co-author of:

The Dream Palaces Part 1: The Atmospherics
Les Tod/Kevin James Cork, ATHS, Sydney NSW Aust.

The Dream Palaces Part 2: The Spanish Influence
Les Tod/Kevin James Cork, ATHS, Sydney NSW Aust.

And the following submissions to the Heritage Office (NSW) and the Australian Heritage Commission:


Thorne, Ross, Les Tod & Kevin Cork
(1983) Theatres and Cinemas In NSW. Stage 2 - Investigation of types of new uses for which theatre buildings have been successfully adapted. Sydney: Heritage Council of New South Wales

Thorne, Ross, Les Tod & Kevin Cork (1996) Movie Theatre Heritage Register for New South Wales 18,96-1996, Sydney: Department of Architecture, University of Sydney. A National Estate Project for the Heritage Office (NSW) and the Australian Heritage Commission.

Kevin James Cork, is also the sole author of:

"Twenty-four miles around Nelungaloo :the history and importance of cinema exhibition in pre-television times to a country area of central-western New South Wales"

Institution University of Western Sydney
Date 1994

Abstract:

Little research into historical, architectural and social significance of the picture theatre in pre-television rural Australian society has been undertaken. Taking a New South Wales country area (to represent a microcosm), this thesis records the picture venues and qualitative research material from past patrons and theatre staff.

The study 1/. establishes the environment created by a picture theatre 2/. shows that New South Wales was typical of Australia in film attendance before the 1960s 3/. introduces the Central-West subject area, and describes how data was gathered from available records 4/. shows the development of the picture venues within the subject areas 5/. gives 'life' to the occasion formerly associated with going to the pictures 6/. suggests the success ot the rural picture shows was a happy co-incidence: the exhibitors' desire to make money and the patrons' desire for a social experience (and entertainment).

A recommendation is made that one of the venues discovered during the course of research should be investigated for heritage listing. It is important that we should acknowledge the vital part that going to the pictures once played in pre-television days, especially in rural areas.

You can dowload this thesis at:

http://library.uws.edu.au/adt-NUWS/public/adt-NUWS20030916.125146/


For further information on Cinemas in Australia, you are referred to the website of the Cinema and Theatre Historical Society, at:

http://www.caths.org.au/welcome.htm

For a list of books and magazines contained within that site, go to:

http://www.caths.org.au/books.htm

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 13.06.2004

Paragon Cafe - Katoomba

Many of the walls of the Paragon are adorned with friezes depicting scenes from Greek history and mythology.

This is another of those friezes.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 13.06.2004

Paragon Cafe - Katoomba

Many of the walls of the Paragon are adorned with friezes from Greek history and mythology.

This is one of those friezes.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 13.06.2004

Paragon Cafe - Katoomba

Quiche water fountain, still on the same counter, still running, and still prominently displayed towards the front of the shop at the Paragon Cafe, Katoomba.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 16.06.2004

Paragon Cafe, Katoomba

Still making and selling the most superior cakes, chocolates, candies & fudges in Australia.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 13.06.2004

Paragon, Katoomba - Street frontage

[This is the text which appeared in the original advertisement to sell the Paragon business and freehold.

The original advertisement can be viewed at

http://www.nationaltrust.com.au/paragon.asp

Note that Kytherian descendants operating a long-standing Real Estate Business, sold the property for Kytherian descendants of a long-standing "cafe" business - in Katoomba.]

**SOLD**

"The Paragon"

Commercial Investment Complex,
63-67 Katoomba Street,
Katoomba

Established 1916

Freehold & Business
$1.95 million


This famous complex was established in 1916 and is still owned and operated by the same family. There is probably no other soda fountain/ milk bar/ cafe/ restaurant in Australia that has survived unaltered and is regarded as a National Treasure.

The freehold complex comprises the restaurant premises, 2 other shops, 2 self contained flats, bakery, chocolate factory, office and storage.

Please note that the freehold is not being offered separately and is to be sold in one line.

The 'Paragon' is down the hill of Katoomba Street, on the western side and not far from the Carrington. Classified by the National Trust, this unique restaurant was started by the Simos family in 1916. An existing Devonshire tea room was taken over and transformed into a Viennese cafe, modelled on a similar establishment which the late Mr. Simos saw while holidaying in Austria.

The original cafe was refitted in 1925 in the then popular Art Deco style and was later extended by the addition of the Banquet Hall in 1934 and the Blue Room in 1936.

While the tea room, still in its original state, is classical in its simplicity, the Banquet Hall decor shows strong pre-Columbian influences. The Blue Room by contrast, is in the International style and has overtones suggestive of the interiors of those marvellous ocean liners of the day, such as "Queen Mary" and "Normandie".

Of the many soda fountains, milk bars, tea rooms and cafes built in Australia between the two wars, few were as sumptuously finished, and none could compare with the 'Paragon'. It is doubtful that any still exist, finished in a similar style, for it has remained unaltered with even its displays and the packaging of its confectionery reflecting the era in which it was created. The fame of the 'Paragon' for its quality as a restaurant, for its interiors and for the excellence of its cakes, hand dipped chocolates, candies and fudges, is well earned and make it a most valued part of our national estate.

Contact: Peter Poulos
Theo Poulos Real Estate Pty Ltd
2 Katoomba Street, Katoomba 2780

Telephone: (02) 4782 1888
Fax: (02) 4782 5126

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 12.06.2004

Ella and Dave Sophios outside the Blue Bird Cafe, Lithgow, NSW, Australia

"This photo was taken outside Dad's Bluebird Cafe in Lithgow, where he met my mother when she came to work for him.

The Bluebird Cafe is classified by
the National Trust."

- Peter Sophios, Mittagong.

For more information on the Sophios family - 2004 visit their website at

http://www.hinet.net.au/~sophios/index.htm

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 25.10.2004

Jim Kepreotes - Gunnedah - in his 40's

Jim Kepreotes - Gunnedah - in his 40's.

For more detailed entries on his involvement in the town of Gunnedah, search under Gunnedah, through the internal search engine provided on the site.

As with many other photographs of Kytherians and Greeks in Gunnedah, the original photograph is held in repository at the:

Water Tower Museum,
Anzac Park
Gunnedah

PO Box 244
Gunnedah
NSW 2380

02 67402230
02 6742 1184
02 6742 3764
02 6742 1519

The Historical Societies of local town's, particularly well organised ones, like this one at Gunnedah, often hold very valuable Kytherian and Greek-Australian, source material.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 26.12.2004

Theo Fatseas - Gunnedah business identity

Theo Fatseas - Gunnedah business identity.
He lived in Gunnedah for 30 years. Theo owned the Monterey Cafe. He had two children, a boy and a girl. Both married and living in Sydney.

Theo Fatseas died on the 10th July, 1997.

[Information from Theo Kepreotes, Maroubra.]

It would be great for family, friends and associates to elaborate much more fully on Theo Fatseas's life.

As with many other photographs of Kytherians and Greeks in Gunnedah, the original photograph is held in repository at the:

Water Tower Museum,
Anzac Park
Gunnedah

PO Box 244
Gunnedah
NSW 2380

02 67402230
02 6742 1184
02 6742 3764
02 6742 1519

The Historical Societies of local town's, particularly well organised ones, like this one at Gunnedah, often hold very valuable Kytherian and Greek-Australian, source material.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 09.06.2004

Busy Bee Cafe, Gunnedah, NSW, Australia - frontage

The Busy Bee Cafe is still a landmark in Gunnedah's central business district. When Loula Zantiotis came to Gunnedah in 1954, Nelson and Neate bootmakers was next door (Pursegloves) with Heath Bros in the shop next to the old Grand Central Hotel (Target Country).

See other entries in this section under Loula Zantiotis, and the Busy Bee Cafe, for more extensive histories.

See section People, subsection - Nicknames for more information about the Zantiotis family from Ayia Anastasia, Kythera, and Gunnedah, NSW.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 25.10.2004

Acropolis Cafe, Gunnedah NSW Australia - facade - 2004

Acropolis Cafe Gunnedah, NSW. The Cafe has long since closed, but the facade still announces the name.

The original owners were the Melitas Brothers, whose name has always remained on the facade.

Kytherians Emanuel Kepreotes and his business partner, Peter Veneris, bought the Acropolis Cafe from the Melitas Brothers, and in the late 1920s they also bought the building. They ran the business until 1945.

For more detailed history see entry entitled "Gunnedah, Emanuel Kepreotes, Peter Venardos & Theo Souris - Acropolis Cafe, White Rose Cafe, and Thriftway", in this section.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by George Poulos on 09.06.2004

Acropolis Cafe, Gunnedah, NSW, Australia - facade still extant

Although the Acropolis Cafe has been closed for many years, the sign on the facade of the building reflects its proud Greek heritage.