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Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Social News on 05.11.2012

Nicholas Peter Careedy (Karydis)

In Loving memory of Nicholas Peter Careedy (Karydis)

1-3-1912 to 14-10-2012

Nicholas Peter Careedy, the fourth child and only son of Peter and Marietta Careedy, was born in Mylopotams, Kythera on the 1st of March 1912. After completing high school in Kythera he remained in his village until he left for military service. He spent the first six months of service in the recruiting office of the 31st regiment in Athens and then in the office of the Military Academy. When he was discharged from the army, Nick completed a bee-keeping course, establishing his own business in Mylopotams; however the economic state of the 1930s forced him to migrate to Australia.

Nick arrived in Toowoomba on the 10th of January 1937 and worked in his brother-in-law, Harry Andronicos’ café. He became involved with the Greek Community’s Kytherian Association in Toowoomba and served on the committee for eight years. He was also on the organising committee of the Greek War Relief Fund.

When Japan bombed Darwin in February 1942, although still a Greek national, Nick enlisted in the Royal Australian Air-Force. He served for 3 ½ years in the security division and saw active service in Darwin and New Guinea. After he received his discharge he went to Goondiwindi for 12 months and then to Toowoomba where with Harry Andronicos opened a drapery business.

From 1946 he was a member of the RSL, eventually forming a Hellenic Sub-Branch. He became the foundation President and served for thirteen years. He was also given life membership in 2001 and a certificate of merit for his service. In 1951, he moved to Brisbane where he opened a frock salon in the city, became treasurer of the Greek Red Cross and a member of the Greek community.

In 1954, he joined AHEPA where he served as National Supreme President and was honoured with Life Membership in 2004.

Nick received the ‘Multicultural Services Award’ from the Premier of Queensland in 1997. Three years later, he was honoured with the Order of Australia medal at Government House for his charity work.

This year Nick was honoured with Life Membership to the Greek community.

Although experiencing much in his life, his proudest moments were marrying Nina Kalafatas in 1963, the birth of their much loved only child Marietta, who with her husband Paul, have been blessed with two beautiful children Connie and Nicholas.

In 2003, Nick, Nina, Paul, Marietta, Connie and Nicholas all journeyed to Greece for 5 weeks where Nick proudly got to show his family his homeland. They even stayed in the house where he was born. This meant so much to him.

In 2007, with the assistance of Doctor Peter Marendy, $20, 000 was raised to build the War Memorial at Agia Paraskevi in Taigum, Queensland, officially unveiled on Remembrance Day. The olive tree, symbolising peace, was lovingly planted and tended by Nick. As it continues to grow, it is a reminder of Nick’s dedication to those who served in wars.

Nick was a fortunate man, living a long, happy life, which many of us got to celebrate earlier this year at his 100th birthday. Living to the grand old age of 100, Nick tended daily to his garden, loved to travel, and enjoyed fishing and lawn bowls.

Nick was also a religious man who enjoyed attending church on a regular basis. He and Nina would try to travel to Greece as often as possible to visit his relatives and friends in Kythera.

Nick led a full and happy life and is now resting in God’s care, watching over us. We will always be grateful to have had the opportunity for Nick to have been part of our lives. Nick will be greatly missed by all his family and friends. He was laid to rest on Friday 19 October 2012 at Agia Paraskevi, Taigum, Australia.

Extract from the eulogy recited by Steven Mallos, Brisbane.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 30.11.2010

Damian N Andronicus, looking across the city from his front balcony

Life in Australia, 1916….how history unfolded in the ensuing generations.

Story number 1:

Damian N Andronicus(Diamianos Andronikos) ……the last man standing…..


Life in Australia , written in 1916, was the first book published in the Greek language in Australia. It was also an important first chronicle of Hellenic involvement in Australian history and culture, and an accurate snapshot of life in Greek-Australia in 1916.

Recently republished by the Kytherian World Heritage Fund (KWHF), this 368 page book provides about 150 pages of micro biographies, life histories and photographs of Greek immigrants. Many Greek Australian families have recognised great grandparents, grandparents and other relatives in these pages.

A number of factors motivated the Trustee of the KWHF, Angelo Notaras, and George C Poulos, to re-publish the book. One of these was a desire to inspire subsequent generations to “fill in the blanks”. What happened to those Greek-Australians featured in Life in Australia? What lives did their children, grand-children and great-grandchildren go on to live? If Greek-Australians could take the time to chronicle how “history unfolded” in subsequent generations, the Greek-Australian threads, would be more deeply interwoven into the tapestry of Australian and Greek diaspora history.

One of the most interesting stories that emerges from Life in Australia, is that of Damian Andronicus. If you turn to pages 165 & 166 of the book,

LIA_Andronicus pages.pdf

you find the life history of Nikolaos Dam. Andronikos. On page 166, is a photo of Nikolaos Andronicus holding his infant son, Damian.

It so happens that Damian is the only person photographed and featured in the book Life in Australia, who is still alive. He is …the last man standing. He is now 95 years of age.

He lives in Kamelion Street, in the well appointed, leafy and attractive suburb of Palio Psihiko in Athens. This is a photo of the view from his back balcony.

Recently, Angelo Notaras and George C Poulos, independently of each other, decided to make a “pilgrimage” to visit him. When I visited, the door was opened to me by his highly efficient Bulgarian Aged Carer, Liza. She took me into the lounge room to meet Damian. He is a tall man, who strikes you instantly as being both urbane and erudite. He is extremely “sharp” for his age. I found it very easy to converse with him, as he followed the thread of our conversation easily.

He told me that the family had left Australia when he was 14 years of age, and settled in Britain. He had joined the British military. He married initially in a civil ceremony, and later in the Greek Orthodox Church. He had spent most of his working life in Britain, but came back to live in Greece, later in life. His marriage was a very happy one. He cared for his wife when she became ill. She has predeceased him.

I usually take copious notes when I visit older people. However in this case, I did not know what to expect upon meeting Damian, and I felt like I was imposing upon him. I now regret not taking the time to write down a more comprehensive “oral history”. Hopefully the KWHF can arrange for this to be done before his demise. I am always reminded of Kevin Cork’s aphorism – “every time an old person dies…a whole library burns down”.

Speaking of libraries, Damian is a well read man, and has always maintained an extensive library. Recently he decided to pack up and send to the Mayor of Kythera, a large number the more valuable works from his library, to form part of the collection of the new Municipal Library on the island. He has maintained enough of his Library in Palio Psihiko, to keep him in reading material.

One of his abiding interests has been philately (the study of stamps). He wrote an article about The Seventh Island: A Short Philatelic History of Kythera, for the Bulletin of the Hellenic Philatelic Society of Great Britain in 1986.

He was very excited that Angelo Notaras has come to visit him, and showed me the Life in Australia books, in Greek and English, that Angelo had delivered to him. He posed with the book open at the page with his photograph as a young infant.

I also took photographs of Damian looking across the city from his front balcony.

How many other stories about how history has unfolded for the families of those included in the publication of Life in Australia, 1916, are yet to be told? What an interesting collection they will make, when they are all written?

George C Poulos

Two versions of Life in Australia, front covers

A limited number of the books Life in Australia in Greek, and Life in Australia in English, are still available.

They cost $50 each. If A Greek and English edition are purchased at the same time, the cost discounts to $80.
Additional postage and handling costs – $10, for up to 3 books.
Credit cards (Visa and Mastercard) accepted.

Available in Australia from:

George C. Poulos

Email, George C Poulos

Ph: 61 2 9388 8320

Angelo Notaras

Email, Angelo Notaras

Ph: 61 2 9810 0194 ext.711 (24hrs)

Fax: 61 2 9810 6691


***To PURCHASE the 2009 replica of the book(s)***:
www.kythera-family.net/LIA/orderform.pdf

.jpg image of the Life in Australia book(s)Order Form

Larger version of 2 books graphic above, available here

More Information about Life in Australia:

Title page of Life in Australia

LIA Front red page.pdf

Pages 1-10, in English translation

Pages 1-10, in the original Greek

An easy way to track the various Greek families represented in the book.

LIA_NAMES_Index_pages.pdf

Life in Australia on display at Cafe Society exhibition at Inverell, April, 2004

Full length panel about the book, at the Inverell exhibition

Kytherians admiring the panel at the Inverell exhibition

Download .pdf of the original artwork for the panel here:

M&G_PANEL_Life _in _Aus.pdf

A typical biographical entry. Nicholas P Aroney (i Liapos), and his son Peter Aroney

Art deco illustrations in the book

Beautiful illustrative flourish 1

Beautiful illustrative flourish 2

Beautiful illustrative flourish 3

Beautiful illustrative flourish 4

Beautiful illustrative flourish 5

Articles & Press about Life in Australia

Excellent, comprehensive, 2008 article about the books pending publication.

LIA article_2008_Book_pending.pdf

Page 30, O Kosmos, Sydney, Friday 6th November, 2009.

O_Kosmos_Syd_6_Nov_09.pdf

Neos Kosmos, 19th November, 2009. Author Vivienne Morris.

NKB_19Nov09_p07.pdf

Antikythera mechanism article with reference to the KWHF, and the 9 Dec, 2009, LIA book launch.

Anti Kythera Mechanism article 2.11.2009.pdf

Sydney Morning Herald, Spectrum Liftout

Sydney Morning Herald, Feature Article

LIA_St_George_Leader_George_Vardas.pdf

For an e-mention at the very prestigious Good Reading Magazine at,

http://www.goodreadingmagazine.com.au/book_events.cfm

Press Releases

Press Release 1 3.11.9.pdf

Press_Release_2_14.11.9.pdf

Press Release_3_25.11.09.pdf

Press_Release_4.pdf

Links to other web pages

greekcity

Library Holdings

National Library of Australia

Speeches about Life in Australia

John Nicholas Comino

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 30.11.2010

Damian N Andronicus, holding the book Life in Australia open.....

at the pages were he is depicted as a young child in his fathers arms. (Pages 165-166).

Life in Australia, 1916….how history unfolded in the ensuing generations.

Story number 1:

Damian N Andronicus(Diamianos Andronikos) ……the last man standing…..


Life in Australia , written in 1916, was the first book published in the Greek language in Australia. It was also an important first chronicle of Hellenic involvement in Australian history and culture, and an accurate snapshot of life in Greek-Australia in 1916.

Recently republished by the Kytherian World Heritage Fund (KWHF), this 368 page book provides about 150 pages of micro biographies, life histories and photographs of Greek immigrants. Many Greek Australian families have recognised great grandparents, grandparents and other relatives in these pages.

A number of factors motivated the Trustee of the KWHF, Angelo Notaras, and George C Poulos, to re-publish the book. One of these was a desire to inspire subsequent generations to “fill in the blanks”. What happened to those Greek-Australians featured in Life in Australia? What lives did their children, grand-children and great-grandchildren go on to live? If Greek-Australians could take the time to chronicle how “history unfolded” in subsequent generations, the Greek-Australian threads, would be more deeply interwoven into the tapestry of Australian and Greek diaspora history.

One of the most interesting stories that emerges from Life in Australia, is that of Damian Andronicus. If you turn to pages 165 & 166 of the book,

LIA_Andronicus pages.pdf

you find the life history of Nikolaos Dam. Andronikos. On page 166, is a photo of Nikolaos Andronicus holding his infant son, Damian.

It so happens that Damian is the only person photographed and featured in the book Life in Australia, who is still alive. He is …the last man standing. He is now 95 years of age.

He lives in Kamelion Street, in the well appointed, leafy and attractive suburb of Palio Psihiko in Athens. This is a photo of the view from his back balcony.

Recently, Angelo Notaras and George C Poulos, independently of each other, decided to make a “pilgrimage” to visit him. When I visited, the door was opened to me by his highly efficient Bulgarian Aged Carer, Liza. She took me into the lounge room to meet Damian. He is a tall man, who strikes you instantly as being both urbane and erudite. He is extremely “sharp” for his age. I found it very easy to converse with him, as he followed the thread of our conversation easily.

He told me that the family had left Australia when he was 14 years of age, and settled in Britain. He had joined the British military. He married initially in a civil ceremony, and later in the Greek Orthodox Church. He had spent most of his working life in Britain, but came back to live in Greece, later in life. His marriage was a very happy one. He cared for his wife when she became ill. She has predeceased him.

I usually take copious notes when I visit older people. However in this case, I did not know what to expect upon meeting Damian, and I felt like I was imposing upon him. I now regret not taking the time to write down a more comprehensive “oral history”. Hopefully the KWHF can arrange for this to be done before his demise. I am always reminded of Kevin Cork’s aphorism – “every time an old person dies…a whole library burns down”.

Speaking of libraries, Damian is a well read man, and has always maintained an extensive library. Recently he decided to pack up and send to the Mayor of Kythera, a large number the more valuable works from his library, to form part of the collection of the new Municipal Library on the island. He has maintained enough of his Library in Palio Psihiko, to keep him in reading material.

One of his abiding interests has been philately (the study of stamps). He wrote an article about The Seventh Island: A Short Philatelic History of Kythera, for the Bulletin of the Hellenic Philatelic Society of Great Britain in 1986.

He was very excited that Angelo Notaras has come to visit him, and showed me the Life in Australia books, in Greek and English, that Angelo had delivered to him. He posed with the book open at the page with his photograph as a young infant.

I also took photographs of Damian looking across the city from his front balcony.

How many other stories about how history has unfolded for the families of those included in the publication of Life in Australia, 1916, are yet to be told? What an interesting collection they will make, when they are all written?

George C Poulos

Two versions of Life in Australia, front covers

A limited number of the books Life in Australia in Greek, and Life in Australia in English, are still available.

They cost $50 each. If A Greek and English edition are purchased at the same time, the cost discounts to $80.
Additional postage and handling costs – $10, for up to 3 books.
Credit cards (Visa and Mastercard) accepted.

Available in Australia from:

George C. Poulos

Email, George C Poulos

Ph: 61 2 9388 8320

Angelo Notaras

Email, Angelo Notaras

Ph: 61 2 9810 0194 ext.711 (24hrs)

Fax: 61 2 9810 6691


***To PURCHASE the 2009 replica of the book(s)***:
www.kythera-family.net/LIA/orderform.pdf

.jpg image of the Life in Australia book(s)Order Form

Larger version of 2 books graphic above, available here

More Information about Life in Australia:

Title page of Life in Australia

LIA Front red page.pdf

Pages 1-10, in English translation

Pages 1-10, in the original Greek

An easy way to track the various Greek families represented in the book.

LIA_NAMES_Index_pages.pdf

Life in Australia on display at Cafe Society exhibition at Inverell, April, 2004

Full length panel about the book, at the Inverell exhibition

Kytherians admiring the panel at the Inverell exhibition

Download .pdf of the original artwork for the panel here:

M&G_PANEL_Life _in _Aus.pdf

A typical biographical entry. Nicholas P Aroney (i Liapos), and his son Peter Aroney

Art deco illustrations in the book

Beautiful illustrative flourish 1

Beautiful illustrative flourish 2

Beautiful illustrative flourish 3

Beautiful illustrative flourish 4

Beautiful illustrative flourish 5

Articles & Press about Life in Australia

Excellent, comprehensive, 2008 article about the books pending publication.

LIA article_2008_Book_pending.pdf

Page 30, O Kosmos, Sydney, Friday 6th November, 2009.

O_Kosmos_Syd_6_Nov_09.pdf

Neos Kosmos, 19th November, 2009. Author Vivienne Morris.

NKB_19Nov09_p07.pdf

Antikythera mechanism article with reference to the KWHF, and the 9 Dec, 2009, LIA book launch.

Anti Kythera Mechanism article 2.11.2009.pdf

Sydney Morning Herald, Spectrum Liftout

Sydney Morning Herald, Feature Article

LIA_St_George_Leader_George_Vardas.pdf

For an e-mention at the very prestigious Good Reading Magazine at,

http://www.goodreadingmagazine.com.au/book_events.cfm

Press Releases

Press Release 1 3.11.9.pdf

Press_Release_2_14.11.9.pdf

Press Release_3_25.11.09.pdf

Press_Release_4.pdf

Links to other web pages

greekcity

Library Holdings

National Library of Australia

Speeches about Life in Australia

John Nicholas Comino

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 30.11.2010

Damian N Andronicus in his home, September 2010

Life in Australia, 1916….how history unfolded in the ensuing generations.

Story number 1:

Damian N Andronicus (Diamianos Andronikos) ……the last man standing…..


Life in Australia , written in 1916, was the first book published in the Greek language in Australia. It was also an important first chronicle of Hellenic involvement in Australian history and culture, and an accurate snapshot of life in Greek-Australia in 1916.

Recently republished by the Kytherian World Heritage Fund (KWHF), this 368 page book provides about 150 pages of micro biographies, life histories and photographs of Greek immigrants. Many Greek Australian families have recognised great grandparents, grandparents and other relatives in these pages.

A number of factors motivated the Trustee of the KWHF, Angelo Notaras, and George C Poulos, to re-publish the book. One of these was a desire to inspire subsequent generations to “fill in the blanks”. What happened to those Greek-Australians featured in Life in Australia? What lives did their children, grand-children and great-grandchildren go on to live? If Greek-Australians could take the time to chronicle how “history unfolded” in subsequent generations, the Greek-Australian threads, would be more deeply interwoven into the tapestry of Australian and Greek diaspora history.

One of the most interesting stories that emerges from Life in Australia, is that of Damian Andronicus. If you turn to pages 165 & 166 of the book,

LIA_Andronicus pages.pdf

you find the life history of Nikolaos Dam. Andronikos. On page 166, is a photo of Nikolaos Andronicus holding his infant son, Damian.

It so happens that Damian is the only person photographed and featured in the book Life in Australia, who is still alive. He is …the last man standing. He is now 95 years of age.

He lives in Kamelion Street, in the well appointed, leafy and attractive suburb of Palio Psihiko in Athens. This is a photo of the view from his back balcony.

Recently, Angelo Notaras and George C Poulos, independently of each other, decided to make a “pilgrimage” to visit him. When I visited, the door was opened to me by his highly efficient Bulgarian Aged Carer, Liza. She took me into the lounge room to meet Damian. He is a tall man, who strikes you instantly as being both urbane and erudite. He is extremely “sharp” for his age. I found it very easy to converse with him, as he followed the thread of our conversation easily.

He told me that the family had left Australia when he was 14 years of age, and settled in Britain. He had joined the British military. He married initially in a civil ceremony, and later in the Greek Orthodox Church. He had spent most of his working life in Britain, but came back to live in Greece, later in life. His marriage was a very happy one. He cared for his wife when she became ill. She has predeceased him.

I usually take copious notes when I visit older people. However in this case, I did not know what to expect upon meeting Damian, and I felt like I was imposing upon him. I now regret not taking the time to write down a more comprehensive “oral history”. Hopefully the KWHF can arrange for this to be done before his demise. I am always reminded of Kevin Cork’s aphorism – “every time an old person dies…a whole library burns down”.

Speaking of libraries, Damian is a well read man, and has always maintained an extensive library. Recently he decided to pack up and send to the Mayor of Kythera, a large number the more valuable works from his library, to form part of the collection of the new Municipal Library on the island. He has maintained enough of his Library in Palio Psihiko, to keep him in reading material.

One of his abiding interests has been philately (the study of stamps). He wrote an article about The Seventh Island: A Short Philatelic History of Kythera, for the Bulletin of the Hellenic Philatelic Society of Great Britain in 1986.

He was very excited that Angelo Notaras has come to visit him, and showed me the Life in Australia books, in Greek and English, that Angelo had delivered to him. He posed with the book open at the page with his photograph as a young infant.

I also took photographs of Damian looking across the city from his front balcony.

How many other stories about how history has unfolded for the families of those included in the publication of Life in Australia, 1916, are yet to be told? What an interesting collection they will make, when they are all written?

George C Poulos

Two versions of Life in Australia, front covers

A limited number of the books Life in Australia in Greek, and Life in Australia in English, are still available.

They cost $50 each. If A Greek and English edition are purchased at the same time, the cost discounts to $80.
Additional postage and handling costs – $10, for up to 3 books.
Credit cards (Visa and Mastercard) accepted.

Available in Australia from:

George C. Poulos

Email, George C Poulos

Ph: 61 2 9388 8320

Angelo Notaras

Email, Angelo Notaras

Ph: 61 2 9810 0194 ext.711 (24hrs)

Fax: 61 2 9810 6691


***To PURCHASE the 2009 replica of the book(s)***:
www.kythera-family.net/LIA/orderform.pdf

.jpg image of the Life in Australia book(s)Order Form

Larger version of 2 books graphic above, available here

More Information about Life in Australia:

Title page of Life in Australia

LIA Front red page.pdf

Pages 1-10, in English translation

Pages 1-10, in the original Greek

An easy way to track the various Greek families represented in the book.

LIA_NAMES_Index_pages.pdf

Life in Australia on display at Cafe Society exhibition at Inverell, April, 2004

Full length panel about the book, at the Inverell exhibition

Kytherians admiring the panel at the Inverell exhibition

Download .pdf of the original artwork for the panel here:

M&G_PANEL_Life _in _Aus.pdf

A typical biographical entry. Nicholas P Aroney (i Liapos), and his son Peter Aroney

Art deco illustrations in the book

Beautiful illustrative flourish 1

Beautiful illustrative flourish 2

Beautiful illustrative flourish 3

Beautiful illustrative flourish 4

Beautiful illustrative flourish 5

Articles & Press about Life in Australia

Excellent, comprehensive, 2008 article about the books pending publication.

LIA article_2008_Book_pending.pdf

Page 30, O Kosmos, Sydney, Friday 6th November, 2009.

O_Kosmos_Syd_6_Nov_09.pdf

Neos Kosmos, 19th November, 2009. Author Vivienne Morris.

NKB_19Nov09_p07.pdf

Antikythera mechanism article with reference to the KWHF, and the 9 Dec, 2009, LIA book launch.

Anti Kythera Mechanism article 2.11.2009.pdf

Sydney Morning Herald, Spectrum Liftout

Sydney Morning Herald, Feature Article

LIA_St_George_Leader_George_Vardas.pdf

For an e-mention at the very prestigious Good Reading Magazine at,

http://www.goodreadingmagazine.com.au/book_events.cfm

Press Releases

Press Release 1 3.11.9.pdf

Press_Release_2_14.11.9.pdf

Press Release_3_25.11.09.pdf

Press_Release_4.pdf

Links to other web pages

greekcity

Library Holdings

National Library of Australia

Speeches about Life in Australia

John Nicholas Comino

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Karen Andronicus on 19.11.2009

John (Jack) Andronicus with granddaughters Karen and Nicole

enjoying a day with Pa!

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Karen Andronicus on 11.10.2011

Charles and George Andronicus

a day at the beach! Charles and George are the sons of the late John (Jack) Andronicus, founder of Andronicus Coffee.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Hugh Gilchrist on 30.01.2006

Ioannis Andronicus.

From, Hugh Gilchrist.

Australians and Greeks. Vol I: The Early Years. p. 203.

Halstead Press
Sydney
1992

From, Chapter XI

Subsection: The Shop-keeping phenomenon. New South Wales. 19th century to WWI.

"...From the Kythiran village of Mylopotamos came seven Andronikos brothers, of whom four built up a tea, coffee and chocolate business which, eighty years later, is still eminent in the beverage and confectionery field. Their interest in tea and coffee and in emigration is said to have been aroused by an uncle, Dr Karydis, a medical officer of the Suez Canal Company.

Nikolaos, the first to arrive (in 1897), acquired a shop in Tamworth, and in 1908 married Antigoni, a daughter of the Reverend Serafeim Phocas. He was followed by brothers Minas (Mick), who opened a cafe in West Maitland, Kosmas (Charles) and Emmanouil, who opened a shop in Tamworth.

In 1907 Charles and Emmanuel Andronicus opened a small shop at 127 York Street in Sydney. Charles visited Calcutta and Colombo and brought back chests of tea and coffee, and fish-frying oil and crockery and fancy goods. Emmanuel, armed with samples, travelled by train around New South Wales, seeking orders from Greek and other shop-keepers for tea, coffee, olive oil, sauces, crockery, cutlery and other items, advancing credit where appropriate.

As their business grew, Charles became a kind of unofficial arbitrator in disputes between up-country Greeks, and a mouth-piece for their grievances.

Ioannis, the youngest brother, after a month at Port Said with his uncle Dr Karydis, arrived in Sydney when he was 13 and lived with his brother Mick in West Maitland, where, for lack of English, he had difficulty in studying at school. When
Mick sold his cafe and moved to Sydney, Ioannis went to brother Nicholas in Tamworth, where he had a happy year at the local convent school.

Nicholas meanwhile had taken in as partner another brother, George, who had landed in Sydney in 1907.

In 1910 Charles, Mick and Emmanuel, joined by John, moved Andronicus Brothers from York Street to 197 George Street, where three of them lived in rooms over the shop. Young John was instructed in the techniques of tea and coffee blending and of packing goods for dispatch.

Mick returned to Greece and in 1912 Nicholas and Antigoni settled in Sydney, where Nicholas managed the Marathon Cafe at 72 Oxford Street. George Andronicus then joined forces with a cousin, Georgios Potiris (who had come to Australia in 1902 and had worked at Barraba), and bought the large Apsley Hotel in Walcha, which they managed until 1919.

Now 19, John Andronicus helped Emmanuel with up-country sales, working the towns near the Queensland border. With his friends John and Antony Notaras he went fishing and shooting at weekends, and on one such excursion his rifle accidentally discharged. The bullet passed close to his heart but John Notaras got him onto a horse-cart and into Grafton, where Dr Page (later Sir Earle Page of the Country Party) operated on him and saved his life; and after three more operations in Sydney he recovered.

After early difficulties, and by prodigious efforts, Andronicus Brothers prospered and its partners played important parts in the Greek community.

Other Andronicus relatives also arrived in Australia before 1915, including Stylianos, who partnered his brother-in-law Panayiotis Kominos in shops in Lismore and Muswellbrook and in a cattle property, and Kharalambos, who had the Club Cafe in Toowoomba.

Another cousin, Mikhail Potiris, who, like his brother George had been persuaded by an Andronicus to leave Mylopotamos for Australia, worked with George Potiris in Barraba and later had a shop in Queanbeyan, but sold it in 1914 and eventually became the second Australian Greek to graduate in medicine".

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Hugh Gilchrist on 30.01.2006

Kosmas Andronicus.

From, Hugh Gilchrist.

Australians and Greeks. Vol I: The Early Years. p. 203.

Halstead Press
Sydney
1992

From, Chapter XI

Subsection: The Shop-keeping phenomenon. New South Wales. 19th century to WWI.

"...From the Kythiran village of Mylopotamos came seven Andronikos brothers, of whom four built up a tea, coffee and chocolate business which, eighty years later, is still eminent in the beverage and confectionery field. Their interest in tea and coffee and in emigration is said to have been aroused by an uncle, Dr Karydis, a medical officer of the Suez Canal Company.

Nikolaos, the first to arrive (in 1897), acquired a shop in Tamworth, and in 1908 married Antigoni, a daughter of the Reverend Serafeim Phocas. He was followed by brothers Minas (Mick), who opened a cafe in West Maitland, Kosmas (Charles) and Emmanouil, who opened a shop in Tamworth.

In 1907 Charles and Emmanuel Andronicus opened a small shop at 127 York Street in Sydney. Charles visited Calcutta and Colombo and brought back chests of tea and coffee, and fish-frying oil and crockery and fancy goods. Emmanuel, armed with samples, travelled by train around New South Wales, seeking orders from Greek and other shop-keepers for tea, coffee, olive oil, sauces, crockery, cutlery and other items, advancing credit where appropriate.

As their business grew, Charles became a kind of unofficial arbitrator in disputes between up-country Greeks, and a mouth-piece for their grievances.

Ioannis, the youngest brother, after a month at Port Said with his uncle Dr Karydis, arrived in Sydney when he was 13 and lived with his brother Mick in West Maitland, where, for lack of English, he had difficulty in studying at school. When
Mick sold his cafe and moved to Sydney, Ioannis went to brother Nicholas in Tamworth, where he had a happy year at the local convent school.

Nicholas meanwhile had taken in as partner another brother, George, who had landed in Sydney in 1907.

In 1910 Charles, Mick and Emmanuel, joined by John, moved Andronicus Brothers from York Street to 197 George Street, where three of them lived in rooms over the shop. Young John was instructed in the techniques of tea and coffee blending and of packing goods for dispatch.

Mick returned to Greece and in 1912 Nicholas and Antigoni settled in Sydney, where Nicholas managed the Marathon Cafe at 72 Oxford Street. George Andronicus then joined forces with a cousin, Georgios Potiris (who had come to Australia in 1902 and had worked at Barraba), and bought the large Apsley Hotel in Walcha, which they managed until 1919.

Now 19, John Andronicus helped Emmanuel with up-country sales, working the towns near the Queensland border. With his friends John and Antony Notaras he went fishing and shooting at weekends, and on one such excursion his rifle accidentally discharged. The bullet passed close to his heart but John Notaras got him onto a horse-cart and into Grafton, where Dr Page (later Sir Earle Page of the Country Party) operated on him and saved his life; and after three more operations in Sydney he recovered.

After early difficulties, and by prodigious efforts, Andronicus Brothers prospered and its partners played important parts in the Greek community.

Other Andronicus relatives also arrived in Australia before 1915, including Stylianos, who partnered his brother-in-law Panayiotis Kominos in shops in Lismore and Muswellbrook and in a cattle property, and Kharalambos, who had the Club Cafe in Toowoomba.

Another cousin, Mikhail Potiris, who, like his brother George had been persuaded by an Andronicus to leave Mylopotamos for Australia, worked with George Potiris in Barraba and later had a shop in Queanbeyan, but sold it in 1914 and eventually became the second Australian Greek to graduate in medicine".

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Hugh Gilchrist on 30.01.2006

Emmanouil Andronicus.

From, Hugh Gilchrist.

Australians and Greeks. Vol I: The Early Years. p. 203.

Halstead Press
Sydney
1992

From, Chapter XI

Subsection: The Shop-keeping phenomenon. New South Wales. 19th century to WWI.

"...From the Kythiran village of Mylopotamos came seven Andronikos brothers, of whom four built up a tea, coffee and chocolate business which, eighty years later, is still eminent in the beverage and confectionery field. Their interest in tea and coffee and in emigration is said to have been aroused by an uncle, Dr Karydis, a medical officer of the Suez Canal Company.

Nikolaos, the first to arrive (in 1897), acquired a shop in Tamworth, and in 1908 married Antigoni, a daughter of the Reverend Serafeim Phocas. He was followed by brothers Minas (Mick), who opened a cafe in West Maitland, Kosmas (Charles) and Emmanouil, who opened a shop in Tamworth.

In 1907 Charles and Emmanuel Andronicus opened a small shop at 127 York Street in Sydney. Charles visited Calcutta and Colombo and brought back chests of tea and coffee, and fish-frying oil and crockery and fancy goods. Emmanuel, armed with samples, travelled by train around New South Wales, seeking orders from Greek and other shop-keepers for tea, coffee, olive oil, sauces, crockery, cutlery and other items, advancing credit where appropriate.

As their business grew, Charles became a kind of unofficial arbitrator in disputes between up-country Greeks, and a mouth-piece for their grievances.

Ioannis, the youngest brother, after a month at Port Said with his uncle Dr Karydis, arrived in Sydney when he was 13 and lived with his brother Mick in West Maitland, where, for lack of English, he had difficulty in studying at school. When
Mick sold his cafe and moved to Sydney, Ioannis went to brother Nicholas in Tamworth, where he had a happy year at the local convent school.

Nicholas meanwhile had taken in as partner another brother, George, who had landed in Sydney in 1907.

In 1910 Charles, Mick and Emmanuel, joined by John, moved Andronicus Brothers from York Street to 197 George Street, where three of them lived in rooms over the shop. Young John was instructed in the techniques of tea and coffee blending and of packing goods for dispatch.

Mick returned to Greece and in 1912 Nicholas and Antigoni settled in Sydney, where Nicholas managed the Marathon Cafe at 72 Oxford Street. George Andronicus then joined forces with a cousin, Georgios Potiris (who had come to Australia in 1902 and had worked at Barraba), and bought the large Apsley Hotel in Walcha, which they managed until 1919.

Now 19, John Andronicus helped Emmanuel with up-country sales, working the towns near the Queensland border. With his friends John and Antony Notaras he went fishing and shooting at weekends, and on one such excursion his rifle accidentally discharged. The bullet passed close to his heart but John Notaras got him onto a horse-cart and into Grafton, where Dr Page (later Sir Earle Page of the Country Party) operated on him and saved his life; and after three more operations in Sydney he recovered.

After early difficulties, and by prodigious efforts, Andronicus Brothers prospered and its partners played important parts in the Greek community.

Other Andronicus relatives also arrived in Australia before 1915, including Stylianos, who partnered his brother-in-law Panayiotis Kominos in shops in Lismore and Muswellbrook and in a cattle property, and Kharalambos, who had the Club Cafe in Toowoomba.

Another cousin, Mikhail Potiris, who, like his brother George had been persuaded by an Andronicus to leave Mylopotamos for Australia, worked with George Potiris in Barraba and later had a shop in Queanbeyan, but sold it in 1914 and eventually became the second Australian Greek to graduate in medicine".

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 04.11.2004

Mr and Mrs Nicholas Andronicos, Sydney, 1996.

This photograph came into my hands via Kevin Cork. Nick Andronicus was for many years involved in the cinema industry - in his early days at Moree, in NSW.

During the 1990's I ran a store in Bondi Junction in Sydney. I had many Kytherian visitors - one of whom was Nick Andronicus.
Nick was a "stirrer". He liked to insist that we second-generation Kytherians were not "real" Kytherians - and could never aspire to that "mantle".

I remember him most as a very exhuburant and positive man, and a very proud Mylopotamian.


During the 1990's KEVIN CORK undertook extensive research into cinema's in Australia.

Tragically, he died before completing his work, but most of the chapters of his Ph.D. Thesis, were completed.

His wife and children have kindly given permission for his work to be reproduced.

Most Australian's would be unaware of the degree to which Greeks, and particularly Kytherian Greeks dominated cinema ownership in Australia - especially in New South Wales.

Chapter 7 of Kevin's thesis, is his attempt to provide a more intimate insight into the character and lives of the Hellenes and Kytherians, who owned, and operated cinema's in New South Wales in the pre-television era. Also to highlight the Cinema's themselves - and their importance in the Hellenic and Kytherian heritage in NSW, and Australia. This has been achieved by providing photographs of people and place.

The Chapter, in written form, flows as one piece. At kythera-family, I am posting the entries, photograph by photograph.

The the importance of the Hellenic and Kytherian contribution to Australian cinema ownership and history is clearly demonstrated in Chapt 7, as in all other chapters.

It is difficult to know how to pass on to Kytherians the results of Kevin Cork's important research's.

In the end, I felt that the results should be passed on in the most extensive way - i.e. in full re-publication of Chapter's.

Eventually all Chapters will appear on the kythera-family web-site.

Other entries can be sourced by searching under "Cork" on the internal search engine.

See also, Kevin Cork, under People, subsection, High Achievers.


Special thanks to Julie Lee, (nee, Cork), Kevin's daughter, who painstakingly searched for the photographs referred to in Chapter 7; found, collated, and supplied them to me in electronic format. [See entry under Julie Lee.]

As she commented: "Finally we've found all the photos! It was very interesting to go through a lot of Dad's research to find these, but I think it was worth it. I can't believe how many drafts he had done of his thesis just to get to the point he finished at".


Chapter 7: Picture Gallery

"What a pity that humans, collectively, have not been endowed with more foresight than hindsight! There'd be more pride in the preservation of our heritage in all fields of endeavour."

"A picture says a thousand words", goes the old saying. This chapter is a photograph album, put together to show what the members of the subject group achieved. Photographs of the men and, in some cases, their wives and families, appear on the following pages as a record to show who they were. Some show people as they were many years ago, at the height of their picture-show days, while others show them as they were a year or two ago when the writer interviewed them. Also included are photographs of the picture theatres that they operated. Photographs of their refreshment rooms and streetscapes of the towns in which they worked are also presented, although these are more of a rarity.

The photographs come from a variety of sources, including the albums of former exhibitors and/or their families. Normally, they would never be seen outside of family circles. The writer was privileged to be permitted to have copies taken from them and to reproduce them here. The sources of all photographs have been acknowledged.

When one looks at streetscape photographs of Walgett and Lake Cargelligo in the 1930s, the architectural statement made by the new theatres is one of vibrancy - they cannot help but be noticed. Yet, there is a sadness associated with them. Picture theatres were meant to be seen at night, but were rarely photographed at night. C Day Lewis, in his poem Newsreel (1938), refers to the picture theatre as "the dream-house" - a place where dreamers can leave "your debts asleep, your history at the door". These buildings have an ambience which evolved because of what they represented. They were places where people socialised and were entertained. (In the case of some country theatres, they were also used for dancing.) The daytime snaps of picture theatres show prominent buildings but do not capture the magic of the buildings that was created once the sun had gone down and their lights came on. This was when they drew patrons to them who were eager for a night of socialising and entertainment. In her poem, Magic, Dorothea Mackellar writes,
"Would you see some magic?
Watch what comes to pass..."
She was writing about trams, not theatres, but the sentiment is the same. By day, trams were just trams. At night, with their lights on and with sparks flashing from their poles, they became "jewelled beetles" scurrying through the dark. Night time was the best time for picture theatres because their dimensions became blurred against the darkness that surrounded them and the only way to view them was by the aid of artificial lighting which, in turn, helped to create the magic associated with them.

With so many of the theatres demolished or altered, the photographs presented on the following pages are the only permanent record of what the men in the subject group achieved.

Photo 4:

Mr and Mrs Nicholas Andronicos, Sydney, 1996.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 30.04.2004

Theo Psaros

c 1927 Theo Psaros(b1898) son of Dimitris Psaros Skouladrianika.Married Calliope(Beatty) Phacheas Lived at Inverelll NSW Australia.