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submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 11.06.2017

i feel like dancing !!

 big social night for the kytherian assocation of quuensland with the annual spaletta dinner dance held in brisbane saturday 10th june , great food , great music , and plenty of dancing , a warm up for the dances on the island this summer .. great night well done to all !

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 26.03.2017

GREEK NATIONAL DAY ...

 president of the kytherian assocation of queensland australia .. mr. peter coroneo  [family from potamos and mylopotamos ].. laying a wreath on behalf of all queensland kytherians and attending the church service for Greek national Day at the greek orthdox church of St. George west end brisbane australia ... xpona polla and zito e ellada !!

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 16.02.2016

Building cultuarl identity through reading

The Weekend Neos Kosmos, (Melbourne)

Saturday 13th February 2016, Page 16

Author Melina Mallos has a winning formula for bringing children in touch with their cultural heritage that Cat while on holiday to her parents' birthplace

ANASTASIA TSIRTSAKIS


One can't think of the beautiful cobbled streets of the Greek islands without the meow of a cat springing to mind.
Whch is why the feline is the perfect protagonist for Melina Mallos' children's book Catch that Cat, which seeks to put children in touch with their Greek cultural heritage.

"A lot (of children] haven't travelled to Greece before. And now,as the generations are progressing, a lot of their grandparents aren't even talking to them in Greek," Melina explains. "So tile book was really about providing opportunities for kids to connect to their Greek heritage, as well as the language,and instil in them a desire to visit Greece and know more about their culture."

The Brisbane-based author was inspired to write Catch that Cat while on holiday to her parents birthplace of Kythera in 2007.

"My aunty lived in Athens and they had a cat in their apartment. They decided to take it to Kythera and leave it on the island; so this cat went from an urban city landscape to rural country. "The cat's still alive and lives on the island.and it survives by the neighbours feeding it," she says.

Keeping the book connected to its roots on the Greek island, the picture book is also being stocked by local booksellers and stores in Kythera. "I noticed there wasn't a souvenir book for kids on the island.So that's another reason I wrote the book, because I thought it was a missed opportunity for so many visitors who come; it's a good little gift that people could take back and share with their kids and grandkids", Melina explains.

Since the book's launch at Brisbane's Greek Festival in May last year,it has been well received both Down Under and in Greece. But for the author, her debut into the world of children's literature was very significant, in that she finally found a way to marry her background in early childhood education and passion for art.

Working with publishers at the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, administered under the auspices of the Kytherian Association of Australia, gave Melina the opportunity to collaborate with Athens­ based illustrator and translator Tety Solou.

With the book available in two editions - bilingual - both Greek and English - and in English alone - it has made it possible for people outside the Greek community to connect with the book's content. "I've been surprised there's been a broader appeal to people who don't have a Greek background. I get a lot of feedback about the
catchy rhyme in it," she says.

Aside from writing, Melina is a leading developer of collaborative
community projects and culturally enriching programs for children. Committed to sharing her knowledge on teaching cultural sensitivities with Australia's parents,she manages
to do so through regular guest blogging, article writing, public speaking and training. "I help children create bonds with their community and culture in order to build a strong sense of self, strengthen their relationships, increase their self-confidence, and experience meaningful connections," says Melina.

But don't worry, that's not the last we'll see of that cat.The author is currently working on her second children's book, a collaborative project through tile Cat Welfare Association of Kythera.

English only versions of Catch that Cat are available for purchase through www.catchthatcat.com (the website also includes free downloadoble kids' activities related to the Australian curriculum for promoting intercultural understanding).

For the bilingual edition, email secretary@kytherianassociation.com.au or phone (02) 9599 6998.

Melina is also available to deliver book readings and workshops for your community, school or cultural festival and can be contacted via her website.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Eptanesian Union Greece on 19.12.2015

Minas Coroneo's private collector's stamp issued through Hellenic Post

Professor Minas Coroneo, wins the award for Kythera, along with Dr Manolis Kalokerinos, at the 3rd Presentation of Ionian (Eptanisian) Union of Greece, Awards.

The awards were held on December 13, 2015,
December 13, 2015 in the National History Museum of the Old Parliament Building.

Invitation to Minas Coroneos to attend the ceremony to receive his award:

The awards ceremony takes place as an expression of respect and pride for Ionians who have excelled in various fields (art, science, culture, etc.) and helped to highlight their place of origin in their own special and unique way.

Consequently, we inform you that unanimously we have chosen among 14 personalities from the Ionian Islands, you Minas Coroneo from the island of Kythera, based on the undeniable recognition that you are one of the most distinguished ophthalmologists in the world. We would be deeply and emotionally honoured to have you and your present at the awards ceremony.

Please be advised that the IONIAN UNION of GREECE to further honour the winners will proceed to create a private collector's stamp - of philatelic value - through the Hellenic Post Office - in the form of a special commemorative series. (A day cover, will utilise your photo, and to be allocated to you).

Hoping for a the positive response to our invitation. Thank you in advance, and wish you every personal and professional success.

The Board of IONIAN UNION of GREECE

The President
Eleni Konofaou
The General. Secretary
Maria Grammatikou
First Deputy Speaker: Evangelos Giannoulatos
Deputy President: Katerina Dragona
Treasurer: Dimitris Mauropous
Assistant Secretary: Angelina Bears
Assistant Treasurer: Gerasimos Rosolymos
Public Relations: Eleftherios Katopodis
Advisors:
Thomas Katsaros
Dimitrios Argyros
Kavvada Basilica
Manias Chrysostom
Loutas Nikolaos
Helen Death
Nikos Glytsos


Report by Lefkada News:

Ionian Islands awards in the old Parliament House

12/14/2015 Views


On Sunday afternoon members of the Ionian Union gathered in the centre of Athens to honour Ionians who have made Ionia (the Eptanisian (seven islands)) proud. For the 3rd year, Old Parliament House, hosted in its imposing hall representatives of the the arts, sciences, and entrepreneurship. From Corfu in the north to Kythera, in the south, Paxos, Ithaca, Lefkada, Zakynthos, and Kefalonia.

They brought together all the leading Ionians who in their professional pathways have managed to make the Ionian Islands a proud and innovative place, and put on show the ‘values and greatness of our island’. The evening began with the greeting of the Union of the Ionian Islands president, Helen Konofaou and poetic rendition entitled "flashed light and how the young person came to know himself”. It was directed by Peter Gallia with Giorgos Vlachos, Katerina Georgakis and Petros Gallia.

Vicky Leandros from Corfu was the first to receive her award. Vicky is a grand and consummate artist, but one of great modesty. She worked alongside Hector Botrini. She said, it all started in Corfu when they built their first restaurant – the wonderful Etrusco. The packed room then waited impatiently for the presentation to Paxos. This was because the award to Paxos was to be presented to Christopher Papakaliatis. The premier of his avant-garde second film "Another World” had occurred just a few days before. The audience delighted in Christopher’s success. He talked about returning to Paxos. About his childhood trips to the island, and the nostalgia. What can you say about the other award for Paxos? Spyros Katsimi. The journalist, writer. The words would be few.

Then it was the turn of Lefkada. And the whole room applauded interminably on hearing the name of Elias Logothetis, of Froufalou, in Lefkada. Although the award was for all the Ionian Islands ..., he said, with his unique brand of humour has, his heart was pounding in Lefkada. The award was received by the deputy of the Cultural Centre, Spyros Arvanitis.

The next award from Lefkada was for a man who is deceased, but still helps and supports, always during the difficult times for Lefkada and Greece. One of these was the recent earthquake. And it was none other than the late Spyros Sklavenitis, owner of the super market SKLAVENITIS. Lefkada was always the dearest place in his life. He passed on his love for Lefkada to his children, who today continue his work. His daughter Maria obviously moved, received the award and spoke of the ‘father of Lefkada’, from the heart. "We will always be next to Lefkas, she said, because we learnt our love of Lefkada from our father. “This even though we grew up in Piraeus; we feel that our life begins from Lefkada ". The award was presented to Maria Sklavenitis by MP Thanassis Kavvadas.

This year Kefalonia honoured Akis Tselenti. Akis is a Seismologist. "The earthquakes should be our friend there in the Ionian islands”, he said. “Thanks to earthquakes we have these beautiful beaches” He also spoke about the dignity of the Cephalonian against the devastating passage of Enceladus. Second Cephalonian to be awarded was Thanos Ascetic, a neurologist, and a psychiatrist specializing in sexual health issues.

Ithaca awarded the teacher John Karantzi – and a doctor and healthcare worker who had excelled abroad, Constantine Rosolymo. Zakynthos honoured a woman who was well received. The businesswoman Vagionia Stasinopoulou. The owner of Empnefstria which sells ‘fresh’ cosmetics, through 250 stores around the world. The business was begun utilising simple recipes from her Zakynthian grandmother.

A moving moment for audience occurred when the mother of the second Zakynthian awardee, the internationally famous tenor, Thimou Flemotomou, received the award for her child, thanking the organizers profusely.

Manolis Kalokerinos, for years the President of the Panhellenic Medical Association and director of the First Surgical Clinic of the General State Athens, from Kythera, needs no introduction. "It's our doctor," exclaimed those who came to the old parliament to honour him. And that was enough to distinguish this great personality from ‘Tsirigo’. Kythera also honoured the great scientist in the field of ophthalmology, from Australia, Minas Coroneo, who has performed extraordinary work in the field of the bionic eye.

[[picture:"IMG_5433.jpg" ID:23280]]

An award was made also to the benefactor of the classical music festival Paxos - late Englishman, John Gough. Gough possessed the vision to begin this unique festival 26 years ago. The award was presented to the organiser of the festival, Eleftheria Arvanitaki.

The master of ceremonies for the event was journalist Peter Koumplis.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Gaye Andronicos Reeve on 19.08.2014

XFactor finalist - through to the third round

Congratulations Rochelle!
Rochelle Pitt-Watson from Cairns in far north Queensland is a nurse by profession, a mother of four children and a singer-songwriter.
Last night Rochelle was voted through to the third round of the Australia wide competition, XFactor shown on channel 7.
Rochelle is the granddaughter of 95 year old Rene Andronicos of Brisbane (author of the recent publication, Maudie..Put the Record on), and great-granddaughter of Theo G. Andronicos (born 1881) Potamos, on the island of Kythera.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Gaye Andronicos Reeve on 13.08.2014

xfactor finalist

Rochelle Pitt, a mature age contestant, has successfully reached the finals of this year's Australia wide xfactor competition on channel 7.
We are very proud of her achievement and wish her every success. Rochelle is the grand-daughter of Rene Andronicos from Brisbane, (author of Maudie Put the Record On) and great-grandaughter of Theo G. Andronicos of Potomos.

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submitted by Gaye Hegeman on 28.11.2013

94 year old Brisbane author, Rene Andronicos, tells her story.

If you live in Brisbane you are invited to attend the launch of Rene's book "Maudie...Put the Record On" at 1 - 2 pm on Monday 2nd December 2013 at Chermside Library, Chermside, Brisbane and meet her in person. Bookings are essential as the library provides refreshments. Phone:(07) 3403 8888.

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submitted by Gaye Hegeman on 28.11.2013

94 year old Brisbane author, Rene Andronicos. The above article is from the Northside Chronicle dated 13th November 2013

Rene has a bubbly, happy, outgoing personality and often claims that she was born laughing. Blessed with a natural gift for story telling and sharp memory she needs little encouragement to launch into anecdotes about her early life. Cooking has featured a lot in her stories usually in association with her father, Theo, who had spent many years either working as a cook or cooking for the family.
Approximately thirty five years ago, Rene had a dream and in that dream she heard her father’s voice saying “Maudie…put the record on!” She mulled over the contents of the dream for a few weeks then began to write, and wrote and wrote continuing for the next few years, adding furthur information about that era gathered through research.
With the encouragement of her family her wish to have her book published has finally come to pass. These days there are fewer anecdotes and stories. There is less urgency in the telling. Her story has been told, written and published.
Rene is the only daughter of Theo G. Andronicos, born Potamos in 1881, who migrated to Sydney in 1897. He married Maude M. Whyte in Brisbane in 1914. Together they had four children, George, Emmanuel, Irene and James. Theo passed away in Brisbane in 1948.
contact details: gayehegeman@hotmail.com

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 15.04.2012

At Ship-A-Hoy just before leaving for the Kythira Ball at Riverside Plaza

Captain Mike and his crew, in fancy dress. There they took the "Premier" award for their presentation in costume, of the "scuttled ship's crew", February 17th, 1940.

It could only happen in NEW YORK, NEW YORK

From the records of the Kythirian Association of New York

Details about the Association:

President: George Kassimatis
Vice President: Malio Belessis
Treasurer: Kathy Patakis-Schenker
Secretary: Anna Stratigos-Formont
Web Master: Francine Moustakalis

The Secretary - Anna Stratigos-Formont,
can be contacted via email here

Click Here to Visit the Website of the Kythirian Association of New York

Historical Background

The Kythira Association of New York was formed in 1919 with Stefanos Fatseas as its first president. He owned the Rockasy Restaurant at 42nd Street (P. Panaretos, 2001).

Committee of the Grand Mask & Civic Ball, c.1919.

Kytherian Celebration and Dinner, Hotel Empire, New York, Sept 29. 1946

In 2001 there were approximately 500 members.

They gather to cut the Vasilopita at a picnic by the sea. They hold a yearly dance and have artoclasia on September 24th each year. They participate in the March 25 parade on 5th Avenue, carrying along the Kytherian labarum. They donated the icon of Panaghia Myrtidiotisa and placed it in a beautiful throne in the Holy Trinity Cathedral in New York.

Their descendants are well-educated and have become medical doctors, attorneys, successful financiers and business persons.

The U.S. ambassador to Greece is a member of New York's Kytherian Society in that his parents were from the village of Kalamos.

There is a provision in the Society's constitution to provide assistance to the sick and the poor of Kytherian descent. The Society pays for doctors' bills, funeral expenses and even transportation of deceased bodies for burial in Kythera.

Background History

History of Migration


From the geocities site:

http://us.geocities.com/raissis/genea4.html

The early American migration pattern is in sharp contrast with the Australian experience; here early Greek settlement tended more to collective enterprise rather than the cumulative effect of individual adventures; eg. 1,400 Greeks founded the communal settlement of New Smyrna in the colony of Florida as early as 1768. Nevertheless, there was still only a small number of Greeks in the USA until the world wide depression of the 1890's turned the trickle of Greek migration into a flood. Between 1890 and 1900, 16,000 Greeks entered the country, a mere 1,400 of whom settled in New York which, even so, had only previously been home to no more than about 100. However, by 1893 there were sufficient numbers to support the establishment of New York's first Greek fraternal organization, the Brotherhood of Athena.

Like other immigrants, the Greeks came to North America to find a better life; they emigrated because of economic necessity, the lack of opportunity in their homeland, or to escape the repression of local governmental officials. Their aim was to make money and return to their homeland and, as a result, until 1910 almost all Greek immigrants were primarily male. But despite their original intentions most did not return and instead remained in the United States and raised families.

Between 1900 and 1915 close to 25% of all Greek males between the ages of 15 and 45 departed for America. By 1913 20,000 of them had chosen to settle in New York, amongst whom was the small Kytherian community which formed the Kytherian Brotherhood of New York in 1917. Twenty four other regional groups had formed Greek fraternal organizations in New York by 1911 which precluded achieving the dominance which the Kytherians achieved in Sydney.

With continuing mass migration and the influx of Asia Minor refugees, nearly 400,000 Greeks had arrived in the USA by 1924. Most entered the food catering trades but unlike Australia a greater proportion also moved into other fields such as construction, taxi cabs, dock laboring and the fur and hotel industries. A steady stream continued in the ensuing decades and by the outbreak of WW2 over 53,000 Greek-Americans were recorded in New York city alone, of whom over 50% were Greek born. By the late 1940's New York had overtaken Chicago as the home to the largest Greek American community in North America.

Strong family ties, fervent Greek nationalism, hard work and upward mobility have been the dominant traits of the Greek immigrant of New York city. Beginning with little capital, thousands entered the American middle class with amazing rapidity. As in Australia, they generally did not make a life career of working for wages but sought to own their own independent businesses as soon as possible.

Today New York city is home to at least 500,000 Greek-Americans, is the headquarters of the Greek Archdiocese of North and South America, has two Greek language daily papers and a plethora of weekly and monthly publications, and is home to hundreds of Greek fraternal, professional, educational, social and religious groups. For a more detailed history of the Greek-American community of New York visit the

"Vryonis Centre" http://www.glavx.org/

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 12.04.2012

Kytherian Celebration and Dinner, Hotel Empire, New York, Sept 29. 1946

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

President: George Kassimatis
Vice President: Malio Belessis
Treasurer: Kathy Patakis-Schenker
Secretary: Anna Stratigos-Formont
Web Master: Francine Moustakalis

The Secretary - Anna Stratigos-Formont,
can be contacted via email here

Click Here to Visit the Website of the Kythirian Association of New York

Historical Background

The Kythira Association of New York was formed in 1919 with Stefanos Fatseas as its first president. He owned the Rockasy Restaurant at 42nd Street (P. Panaretos, 2001).

Committee of the Grand Mask & Civic Ball, c.1919.

In 2001 there were approximately 500 members.

They gather to cut the Vasilopita at a picnic by the sea. They hold a yearly dance and have artoclasia on September 24th each year. They participate in the March 25 parade on 5th Avenue, carrying along the Kytherian labarum. They donated the icon of Panaghia Myrtidiotisa and placed it in a beautiful throne in the Holy Trinity Cathedral in New York.

Their descendants are well-educated and have become medical doctors, attorneys, successful financiers and business persons.

The U.S. ambassador to Greece is a member of New York's Kytherian Society in that his parents were from the village of Kalamos.

There is a provision in the Society's constitution to provide assistance to the sick and the poor of Kytherian descent. The Society pays for doctors' bills, funeral expenses and even transportation of deceased bodies for burial in Kythera.

Background History

History of Migration


From the geocities site:

http://us.geocities.com/raissis/genea4.html

The early American migration pattern is in sharp contrast with the Australian experience; here early Greek settlement tended more to collective enterprise rather than the cumulative effect of individual adventures; eg. 1,400 Greeks founded the communal settlement of New Smyrna in the colony of Florida as early as 1768. Nevertheless, there was still only a small number of Greeks in the USA until the world wide depression of the 1890's turned the trickle of Greek migration into a flood. Between 1890 and 1900, 16,000 Greeks entered the country, a mere 1,400 of whom settled in New York which, even so, had only previously been home to no more than about 100. However, by 1893 there were sufficient numbers to support the establishment of New York's first Greek fraternal organization, the Brotherhood of Athena.

Like other immigrants, the Greeks came to North America to find a better life; they emigrated because of economic necessity, the lack of opportunity in their homeland, or to escape the repression of local governmental officials. Their aim was to make money and return to their homeland and, as a result, until 1910 almost all Greek immigrants were primarily male. But despite their original intentions most did not return and instead remained in the United States and raised families.

Between 1900 and 1915 close to 25% of all Greek males between the ages of 15 and 45 departed for America. By 1913 20,000 of them had chosen to settle in New York, amongst whom was the small Kytherian community which formed the Kytherian Brotherhood of New York in 1917. Twenty four other regional groups had formed Greek fraternal organizations in New York by 1911 which precluded achieving the dominance which the Kytherians achieved in Sydney.

With continuing mass migration and the influx of Asia Minor refugees, nearly 400,000 Greeks had arrived in the USA by 1924. Most entered the food catering trades but unlike Australia a greater proportion also moved into other fields such as construction, taxi cabs, dock laboring and the fur and hotel industries. A steady stream continued in the ensuing decades and by the outbreak of WW2 over 53,000 Greek-Americans were recorded in New York city alone, of whom over 50% were Greek born. By the late 1940's New York had overtaken Chicago as the home to the largest Greek American community in North America.

Strong family ties, fervent Greek nationalism, hard work and upward mobility have been the dominant traits of the Greek immigrant of New York city. Beginning with little capital, thousands entered the American middle class with amazing rapidity. As in Australia, they generally did not make a life career of working for wages but sought to own their own independent businesses as soon as possible.

Today New York city is home to at least 500,000 Greek-Americans, is the headquarters of the Greek Archdiocese of North and South America, has two Greek language daily papers and a plethora of weekly and monthly publications, and is home to hundreds of Greek fraternal, professional, educational, social and religious groups. For a more detailed history of the Greek-American community of New York visit the

"Vryonis Centre" http://www.glavx.org/

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Gaye Hegeman on 29.02.2012

Congratulations! 100th birthday - 28th February 2012

Iris Andronicos celebrated her 100th birthday yesterday at her home in the Brisbane suburb of Taringa, in the company of family and friends. Iris is the widow of George T. Andronicos, son of Theo G. Andronicos (Potamos) who arrived in Sydney in 1897. Seated to her right is her sister-in-law, Rene Cook (nee Andronicos) aged 92, younger sister of George.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Wedding party of Emmanuel Cavacos and Pauline Pradelle

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais.

The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by James Gavriles on 10.09.2008

Mother and daughter

My Cousins ,living in Milford Michigan.
Harriet Panaretos Raphael, and Daughter Denise. On a recent visit Sept.08

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 17.11.2007

Peter Panaretos New York Kytherian Association

Peter Panaretos (New York), Peter McCarthy (Inverell NSW Australia), Metaxia Poulos (Summer Edition Kythera) and Deanna McCarthy (nee Psaros- Phacheas) gather at Lily's in Potamos October 2007.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by James Gavriles on 24.08.2007

Cousins getogether 2006

Picture taken last year at Luncheon get together.L to R; Nancy Panaretos,Judy Panaretos,Rosemary Pappas Collias,Irene Panaretos,friend Nancy Moore,John Peter Panaretos,Paul T. Panaretos,Ted Minas Panaretos.
I was taking the picture Jim Gavriles

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submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 10.03.2007

Panaretos and Chlentzos in California

Terry Chlentzos-Keramaris, Joy Raphael, and Hariklia Panaretos Raphael (from Michigan, USA) in Santa Barbara, CA USA on 9 March, 2007

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 06.02.2007

Vikki (Chlentzos-Alfieris) Vrettos and Tom Fraioli and family.

The photo was taken while vacationing in Zakynthos, Greece in June 2005. Pictured are Tom, Jamie, Vikki and Tommy Fraioli. The Fraioli famly resides in California.

Vikki's grandmother was Maria Venardos Chlentzos Alfieris (1882-1968), from Christoforyiankia. She decends from Manoli Venardos and Martha Koroneos and Panatiotis Chlentzos and Theodora Sofios.

Vikki's grandfather was Yiannis Giorgos Alfieris (1882-1966) from Potamos. He decends from Giorgos Alfieris and Spirithoula Argyris.
Yiannis and Maria immigrated to Egypt then to the USA in 1906.

See also:

Kythera Connections

John and Maria Alflieris approximately 1903

Please contact me with any information on relatives of these families.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Stella Aird (nee, Kelly) on 22.12.2005

Proud grandmother with her grandsons.

Stella is holding latest grandson, Hamish Jack Aird, and is flanked by older grandsons, Nicholas and Toby Beed; the sons of Eleyna Beed (nee, Aird), Stella's second oldest daughter.

Hamish was born on 14.10.05.

Parents of the baby are Jonathan and Michelle Aird.

Jonathon is the only son of proud parent [holding the baby], Stella Aird (nee, Kelly), and David Aird, originally from Scotland.

Stella, in turn, is the daughter Chris(anthe) Kelly (nee, Yeoryopoulos), from Potamos, Kythera.

Chris and her husband, Paul Kelly, owned the ABC Cafe, Gilgandra, for many decades.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Stella Aird (nee, Kelly) on 22.12.2005

Hamish Jack Aird, with cousins, Nicholas and Toby Beed.

Hamish Jack Aird was born 14.10.05.

Nicholas and Toby are the sons of Eleyna Beed (nee, Aird), daughter of David and Stella Aird.

The parents of the baby are Jonathan and Michelle Aird.

Jonathon is the only son of proud parents Stella Aird (nee, Kelly), and David Aird, originally from Scotland.

Stella, in turn, is the daughter of Chris(anthe) Kelly (nee, Yeoryopoulos), from Potamos, Kythera.

Chris and her husband, Paul Kelly, owned the ABC Cafe, Gilgandra, for many decades.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Stella Aird (nee, Kelly) on 22.12.2005

Proud father Jonathon, with his mates and his Dad.

Celebrate the birth of Hamish Jack Aird.

Hamish was born on 14.10.05.

Hamish's mother is Michelle.

Jonathon is 2nd from the right in the photograph. [White checked shirt].

Jonathon is the only son of proud parents Stella Aird (nee, Kelly), and David Aird, originally from Scotland.

David Aird is standing on the far left hand side in the photograph.

Stella, David's wife, is the daughter of Chris(anthe) Kelly (nee, Yeoryopoulos), from Potamos, Kythera.

Chris and her husband, Paul Kelly, owned the ABC Cafe, Gilgandra, for many decades.