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Diaspora Social Life / Friligianika

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submitted by The Daily Examiner, Grafton on 30.10.2014

"Biggest event to hit Grafton in 25 years"

Grafton Examiner, 28th Oct 2014

Clair Morton


Photograph: TRIUMPH: The audience was wowed by the music and singing of An Afternoon at the Proms.

GRAFTON'S Afternoon at the Proms may have even been better than the real thing.

Angelo Notaras thinks so, and judging by the crowd's enthusiastic standing ovations on Sunday afternoon, they do too.

An Afternoon at the Proms, based on the Proms Concert of London, was a first for the Clarence Valley and included all the classics, including Land of Hope and Glory and Sailor's Horn Pipe performed by the Clarence Valley Sinfonia Orchestra.

Having been to the Proms in London on many occasions, Mr Notaras, also the co-owner of the Saraton Theatre, said he was happy to report the success of the local version might have secured its future as an annual event.

"I think it might have been the biggest event to hit Grafton in 25 years," Mr Notaris said.

"The thing that stuck me was enthusiasm and community spirit of all the people on stage.

"Grafton doesn't understand how lucky they are to have people like composer Greg Butcher and everyone else in this town, and we need to have things like this so people like this can come out and blossom."

Composer Greg Butcher said the show was tremendous.

"I'm very proud of how well both the orchestra and choir played," Mr Butcher said. "Nothing like this has been done for a while with local musicians and it all came off."

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Courier Mail, Brisbane on 13.04.2013

The road to "Freeleagusville"

Our Greeks have kin on Kythera

Courier-Mail 8th June, 1972, page 2


Alan Underwood, who has just visited Greece on the inaugural Sydney-Athens flight of Olympic Airways, found an island that seemed largely populated with relatives of Queensland Greeks…

Alex Freeleagus, Greece's Aussie-born Consul in Queensland — might have told me before we landed on the Island of Kythera. This lonely, 14-miles-long mass of flinty rocks and leathery Greeks probably has stronger ties with Queensland than any other spot in the world.

Of course it is the home island of the Freeleagus clan. Alec's dad, Christie, left his rocky village when he was 12 - in 1900. When Christie's mother next saw the boy when he was 30 — and infinitely more prosperous then he would have been back at Friligianika.

Kythera is a dot off the southern end of the Peloponnese. There's a weekly ferry connecting it with Athens, and the trip takes 14 hours. I would never have seen Kythera but for the Kytherians who had just built a beautiful little airstrip — and Alexander Onassis.

I met Alexander - son of Ari - at a party. Alexander is a keen airman.
He helps his famous father by running Olympic Airways charter-plane division.

Light plane

He offered a light plane to fly Free¬leagus and me to Kythera for the week¬end.

On board with us, as wonderful guides and company we had the Athens Kytherian Association President (Con Lourandos) and Alec's cousin, George Panaretos.

I have lost track of the Freeleagus family tree, but for years, George ran the Lucky Black Cat Casket Agency, in Queen Street, Brisbane.
We're going to share a ticket. Con, tall, greying, soldierly, was a great hero of Kythera's fierce resistance to the Germans.

Alec, one of my old Air Force Reserve colleagues is a pilot. He took the front seat alongside the twin-engined Piper Aztec’s charter pilot.
In fact, Alec flew the Aztec most of the way and landed it perfectly on Kythera strip.

One thing about the Kythera strip: there was no shortage of hard rock,
In fact, the volunteer Kytherians who gave their land and their labor free, had to shave the rock with bulldozers to gain the right levels.
Six carloads turned out to meet us. Of course, there was the president of Friligianika himself, Peter Frilingos.

There was the entire Kytherian police force, the priest, and very many excited relatives of Queensland consul Alec.

Friligianika – “Freeleagusville”, I kept translating it mentally - is the ancestral base of Alec's forbears.

It is a tiny, windswept group of little white-washed houses. Your Main impression is of rocks a - hard, grey rocks. Everywhere they have been cleared, or piled up, or made into cottages or fences.

And the Freeleagus windmill. The Freeleagus's was especially important
because of this. For miles around, farmers in the past had to bring their grain to the cloth-sailed mill for grinding. Today the 200-year-old mill is a relic. Its iron roof is gaping and rusty.

Alec's father's old home, the cottage he left at 12 for Australia, is in good shape, but deserted. Inside it is musty. There's a giant fireplace. The rooms are small, their walls thick with layers of whitewash. Here, for generations, were born and reared members of the Freeleagus main family line.

It was in the village of Friligianika Kythera’s remarkable links with Queensland began to show.

Peter Frilingos, 73, told me how he had been in Brisbane front 1922 to 1935. He used to own the old Central Café in Edward Street. “Near the-old Brisbane Courier building," Peter explained. "Then later, for 61 years I had the Crown Cafe — in George Street, near the courthouse."

We drove through Arondianika, a rocky, scrubby hamlet on the Kytherian moorlands, alive with bright yellow bloom. It is the home village of the Aroney family — well-known in Queensland and New South Wales.
Today most of the Aroneys seem to have emigrated, their farms deserted enclosures with rock fences.

A stop at a village named Karvounades. A sip of ouzo and a nibble of grilled octopus at an open air table facing the church.

The cafe owner is Con Lourandos. His brother Nick, a retired N.S.W. wheat grower living in Sydney, recently endowed the chair of Modern Greek language at Sydney University. Also, Nick gave Karvournades its bright, modern school. '

Through Kythera township – to Kapsali, the fishing port with its old Venetian castle. "It was from these battlements that Kytherians in World War II cheered as the cruiser Sydney sank the Italian warship Bartolomeo Colleoni, one of the locals told me.

Back inland, it was lunch at two at the pension and cafe of another Lourandos - John. Fish, fresh from the nets at Kapsali grilled with olive oil, goat-milk mizithra (it's something between a cheese and a yoghurt) covered with local honey.

Rose wine

More ouzo, some local vintage rose wine. Bed according to the Greek custom at 3 p.m., upstairs, in the Lourandos pension. Pension-owner Lourandos' uncle, John Cominos, now in Brisbane, used to be in business in Gladstone. Before the alumina boom, regrettably. Lourandos's brother is Greek vice-consul in Tasmania.

Out of bed at 7 p.m. It's dinner with all the presidents of the main Kytherian communities. And later a moonlight walk — over a landmark, the Katouni Bridge.

On the bridge a young Greek driver pulls up. He announces he comes from Glen Innes, and is "home" in Kythera for a couple of years.

Next morning at seven I strolled again in Livadi village. The shoe-shop man stopped me: "My son, George Vlandis, is in Australia. He has the Tourist Cafe, in Gosford."

On Sunday morning, in the Monastery of Myrtidiottisa (free board and lodgings for all) they showed me a bishops marble throne. It was given by a Kytherian who made his fortune in Sydney.

We drove up to another monastery Saint Moni — on a concrete road, built with mostly Australian money.

Through Kalokerines, a deserted village. It was the home of the Kalokerinos family, fairly prominent among Greeks in Australia.

Past women on donkeys, to Sunday morning in Potamos, where the action is. Its market day, under the pine trees - where they used to tie bullocks for slaughter. A statue overlooking the square of General Peter Coroneos, a Crimea hero and a native of Potamos. A forebear of the Coroneos of Queensland, of course.

But, I was warned, the famous Corones of Charleville came not from Potamos, but from Friligianika, home of the Freeleaguses.

The post office is open on Sunday, and the bank. Kytherians are opening up their money orders, mostly from Australia, banking them, and cashing them. Every month from this post office there is an average of 20 phone calls to Australia.

Sipping ouzo and coffee under the slaughter tree I meet Theo Argery:
"I used to run the butchery in Logan Road, Greenslopes. My brother-in-law, the late Harry Lewis, had Lewis' cafe, in Bundaberg."
Theo retired 11 years ago, and now is contented, back on Kythera.

Someone tells me about Cominos: “Yes, most of the Cominos in Queensland come from Kythera originally. But not all Comino cafes in Queensland are really Comino cafes. “The name became so famous as a good place to eat, that Greeks of any name started calling their cafes 'Comino's’."

Andronicus the Big Australian coffee man, they told me in Potamos, was a member of a Potamos family.

For our weekend on Kythera, this was the pattern. I was assured there are five times as many Kytherians living in Australia as there are Kytherians living in Kythera. "If Australia goes under, Kythera will sink", Con Lourandos grinned.

Olives, honey, cheese, fishing are Kythera’s chief local economy. But every month the banks on Kythera receive about A$50,000 in remittances from abroad - about two-thirds of it from Australia.
Most of this, of course, is money from Greek sons to their old folk on the island.

Kythera is a dying island. I went into a school, where, the teacher told me, 50 years ago there were 500 children. Now it has 60. The islands population is slightly more than 4000 - compared with more than 8000 in 1940. The average age on Kythera is between 35 and 40. I met several in their nineties. There is nothing on Kythera for young people. Who can blame them for migrating to Australia?

Gabba accent

Our last meal on Kythera was lunch at a seaside resort, named Saint Pelagia, Conomos Cafe, in fact. I was greeted by Mike Conomos. "Gee,” (in a Gabba accent) — "I know you. I've served you in my shop. You know, Stanley Street, East Brisbane."

Mike migrated from Kythera to Brisbane 24 years ago, when he was 17.
He's sold the Stanley Street business, and is "holidaying" with his folk on Kythera — with his Aussie wife, Freda and the kids. "Gosh" - Mike confessed. "Greece takes a bit of getting used to. When I got off the plane at Athens and saw all the traffic travelling on the wrong side of the road – gee.”

“See that holiday house next door to us here? That belongs to a Brisbane crowd - the Sourrises - you know 'em?”

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Courier Mail, Brisbane on 13.04.2013

Our Greeks have kin on Kythera

Courier-Mail 8th June, 1972, page 2

Alan Underwood, who has just visited Greece on the inaugural Sydney-Athens flight of Olympic Airways, found an island that seemed largely populated with relatives of Queensland Greeks…

Alex Freeleagus, Greece's Aussie-born Consul in Queensland — might have told me before we landed on the Island of Kythera. This lonely, 14-miles-long mass of flinty rocks and leathery Greeks probably has stronger ties with Queensland than any other spot in the world.

Of course it is the home island of the Freeleagus clan. Alec's dad, Christie, left his rocky village when he was 12 - in 1900. When Christie's mother next saw the boy when he was 30 — and infinitely more prosperous then he would have been back at Friligianika.

Kythera is a dot off the southern end of the Peloponnese. There's a weekly ferry connecting it with Athens, and the trip takes 14 hours. I would never have seen Kythera but for the Kytherians who had just built a beautiful little airstrip — and Alexander Onassis.

I met Alexander - son of Ari - at a party. Alexander is a keen airman.
He helps his famous father by running Olympic Airways charter-plane division.

Light plane

He offered a light plane to fly Free¬leagus and me to Kythera for the week¬end.

On board with us, as wonderful guides and company we had the Athens Kytherian Association President (Con Lourandos) and Alec's cousin, George Panaretos.

I have lost track of the Freeleagus family tree, but for years, George ran the Lucky Black Cat Casket Agency, in Queen Street, Brisbane.
We're going to share a ticket. Con, tall, greying, soldierly, was a great hero of Kythera's fierce resistance to the Germans.

Alec, one of my old Air Force Reserve colleagues is a pilot. He took the front seat alongside the twin-engined Piper Aztec’s charter pilot.
In fact, Alec flew the Aztec most of the way and landed it perfectly on Kythera strip.

One thing about the Kythera strip: there was no shortage of hard rock,
In fact, the volunteer Kytherians who gave their land and their labor free, had to shave the rock with bulldozers to gain the right levels.
Six carloads turned out to meet us. Of course, there was the president of Friligianika himself, Peter Frilingos.

There was the entire Kytherian police force, the priest, and very many excited relatives of Queensland consul Alec.

Friligianika – “Freeleagusville”, I kept translating it mentally - is the ancestral base of Alec's forbears.

It is a tiny, windswept group of little white-washed houses. Your Main impression is of rocks a - hard, grey rocks. Everywhere they have been cleared, or piled up, or made into cottages or fences.

And the Freeleagus windmill. The Freeleagus's was especially important
because of this. For miles around, farmers in the past had to bring their grain to the cloth-sailed mill for grinding. Today the 200-year-old mill is a relic. Its iron roof is gaping and rusty.

Alec's father's old home, the cottage he left at 12 for Australia, is in good shape, but deserted. Inside it is musty. There's a giant fireplace. The rooms are small, their walls thick with layers of whitewash. Here, for generations, were born and reared members of the Freeleagus main family line.

It was in the village of Friligianika Kythera’s remarkable links with Queensland began to show.

Peter Frilingos, 73, told me how he had been in Brisbane front 1922 to 1935. He used to own the old Central Café in Edward Street. “Near the-old Brisbane Courier building," Peter explained. "Then later, for 61 years I had the Crown Cafe — in George Street, near the courthouse."

We drove through Arondianika, a rocky, scrubby hamlet on the Kytherian moorlands, alive with bright yellow bloom. It is the home village of the Aroney family — well-known in Queensland and New South Wales.
Today most of the Aroneys seem to have emigrated, their farms deserted enclosures with rock fences.

A stop at a village named Karvounades. A sip of ouzo and a nibble of grilled octopus at an open air table facing the church.

The cafe owner is Con Lourandos. His brother Nick, a retired N.S.W. wheat grower living in Sydney, recently endowed the chair of Modern Greek language at Sydney University. Also, Nick gave Karvournades its bright, modern school. '

Through Kythera township – to Kapsali, the fishing port with its old Venetian castle. "It was from these battlements that Kytherians in World War II cheered as the cruiser Sydney sank the Italian warship Bartolomeo Colleoni, one of the locals told me.

Back inland, it was lunch at two at the pension and cafe of another Lourandos - John. Fish, fresh from the nets at Kapsali grilled with olive oil, goat-milk mizithra (it's something between a cheese and a yoghurt) covered with local honey.

Rose wine

More ouzo, some local vintage rose wine. Bed according to the Greek custom at 3 p.m., upstairs, in the Lourandos pension. Pension-owner Lourandos' uncle, John Cominos, now in Brisbane, used to be in business in Gladstone. Before the alumina boom, regrettably. Lourandos's brother is Greek vice-consul in Tasmania.

Out of bed at 7 p.m. It's dinner with all the presidents of the main Kytherian communities. And later a moonlight walk — over a landmark, the Katouni Bridge.

On the bridge a young Greek driver pulls up. He announces he comes from Glen Innes, and is "home" in Kythera for a couple of years.

Next morning at seven I strolled again in Livadi village. The shoe-shop man stopped me: "My son, George Vlandis, is in Australia. He has the Tourist Cafe, in Gosford."

On Sunday morning, in the Monastery of Myrtidiottisa (free board and lodgings for all) they showed me a bishops marble throne. It was given by a Kytherian who made his fortune in Sydney.

We drove up to another monastery Saint Moni — on a concrete road, built with mostly Australian money.

Through Kalokerines, a deserted village. It was the home of the Kalokerinos family, fairly prominent among Greeks in Australia.

Past women on donkeys, to Sunday morning in Potamos, where the action is. Its market day, under the pine trees - where they used to tie bullocks for slaughter. A statue overlooking the square of General Peter Coroneos, a Crimea hero and a native of Potamos. A forebear of the Coroneos of Queensland, of course.

But, I was warned, the famous Corones of Charleville came not from Potamos, but from Friligianika, home of the Freeleaguses.

The post office is open on Sunday, and the bank. Kytherians are opening up their money orders, mostly from Australia, banking them, and cashing them. Every month from this post office there is an average of 20 phone calls to Australia.

Sipping ouzo and coffee under the slaughter tree I meet Theo Argery:
"I used to run the butchery in Logan Road, Greenslopes. My brother-in-law, the late Harry Lewis, had Lewis' cafe, in Bundaberg."
Theo retired 11 years ago, and now is contented, back on Kythera.

Someone tells me about Cominos: “Yes, most of the Cominos in Queensland come from Kythera originally. But not all Comino cafes in Queensland are really Comino cafes. “The name became so famous as a good place to eat, that Greeks of any name started calling their cafes 'Comino's’."

Andronicus the Big Australian coffee man, they told me in Potamos, was a member of a Potamos family.

For our weekend on Kythera, this was the pattern. I was assured there are five times as many Kytherians living in Australia as there are Kytherians living in Kythera. "If Australia goes under, Kythera will sink", Con Lourandos grinned.

Olives, honey, cheese, fishing are Kythera’s chief local economy. But every month the banks on Kythera receive about A$50,000 in remittances from abroad - about two-thirds of it from Australia.
Most of this, of course, is money from Greek sons to their old folk on the island.

Kythera is a dying island. I went into a school, where, the teacher told me, 50 years ago there were 500 children. Now it has 60. The islands population is slightly more than 4000 - compared with more than 8000 in 1940. The average age on Kythera is between 35 and 40. I met several in their nineties. There is nothing on Kythera for young people. Who can blame them for migrating to Australia?

Gabba accent

Our last meal on Kythera was lunch at a seaside resort, named Saint Pelagia, Conomos Cafe, in fact. I was greeted by Mike Conomos. "Gee,” (in a Gabba accent) — "I know you. I've served you in my shop. You know, Stanley Street, East Brisbane."

Mike migrated from Kythera to Brisbane 24 years ago, when he was 17.
He's sold the Stanley Street business, and is "holidaying" with his folk on Kythera — with his Aussie wife, Freda and the kids. "Gosh" - Mike confessed. "Greece takes a bit of getting used to. When I got off the plane at Athens and saw all the traffic travelling on the wrong side of the road – gee.”

“See that holiday house next door to us here? That belongs to a Brisbane crowd - the Sourrises - you know 'em?”

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 20.12.2012

Anthea Toda (nee, Notaras), with her daughter Mia

On the occasion of Anthea's father, Angelo Notaras receiving the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

On the 10th December, 2012, at a ceremony at the Athenian Restaurant, Barrack Street, Sydney, attended by family, friends, and members of the Committee of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Angelo Notaras was presented with the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

Kytherian Medal of Honour, Reverse side.

He was also presented with a Certificate of Recognition which read:

Hellenic Republic

Municipality of Kythera

Honorary Award

KYTHERIAN MEDAL OF HONOUR

To

Evangelos Notaras,

in recognition of his achievements for the Greek Orthodox Church

and his social and cultural contribution

to Greek-Australian & Kytherian Culture

both in Australia and in Kythera

Kythera, December 1, 2012,

The Mayor of Kythera

Theodore Koukoulis

The Medal of the Municipality of Kythera
awarded by Professor George Leontsinis,
Municipal Councillor,
Representative of the Municipality of Kythera

Angelo Notaras received the award for the following services:

Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).


Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera
.

In 2000 Angelo Notaras was a member of the Millennium Heritage Committee of the Greek Orthodox Church and of the Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame. The Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame ensured recognition for Australian athletes of Greek heritage who had represented Australia and had attained prominent positions in Australian sport. The Millennium Heritage Committee formed the Provicare Foundation, a charity established under the auspices of the Greek Orthodox Church to aid disadvantaged persons suffering from alcohol and drug addiction.

Funding for the Provicare Foundation was undertaken on an Australia-wide basis under the direction of Angelo Notaras and Father Steven Scoutas of St Spyridon Church, Kingsford. Angelo Notaras and Father Steven developed a proposal under which Angelo and John manufactured (all at their own cost) moulds to create thousands of hollow plastic batons, fashioned to resemble Greek columns, that were distributed to communities and parishes throughout Australia, to be filled with coin donations. They also coordinated the packaging, transport and delivery of the plastic batons to every single Greek Orthodox parish and community across Australia, as well as monitoring and accounting for the returns after nine months. The initial efforts raised $500,000 and, with subsequent distribution and collection of batons, the final fundraising amount totalled some $700,000. This amount has been used to further the aims of the Provicare Foundation, focusing particularly on the Sydney metropolitan area. The success of these achievements is principally due to the inspiration, financial support and commitment of Angelo Notaras.

Angelo Notaras also participated in further fundraising for the purposes of refurbishing premises provided by the NSW Government at Marine Parade, Brighton-le-Sands; a sum in excess of $100,000 was raised for the Provicare Foundation and the Greek Welfare Centre to provide social services to disadvantaged persons.

As a result of these acts of beneficence, Angelo was awarded the "Cross of St. Andrew", the Greek Orthodox Church's highest award. The medal was presented on 28 November 2003 for “valuable services to the Church and the community”. (A photograph of Angelo Notaras, with wife Mary, taken on the day of presentation, is included with this nomination).
Services to the island of Kythera, Greece, and the Greek-Australian and Kytherian-Australian community.

Kythera is a small island that lies at the tip of the Peloponnese in southern Greece. The large island of Crete is located to the South of Kythera. Since 1854, a majority of the islands’ residents have chosen to migrate to Australia. 3000 Kytherians live on the island. There are 60,000 Kytherians and their descendants’ resident in Australia.

In 2003 James Prineas, a Kytherian-Australian living in Germany, devised the concept of an electronic cultural archive, based on an open access web-site. He proposed that www.kythera-family.net be established, and that instead of being based on the ‘standard’ principle of a ‘central’ web master, monitoring and ordering web content – the kythera-family site should be accessible to all. Kytherians from all around the world were empowered to upload photographs, stories and audio-files, directly onto the site. The concept sounds passé, 10 years ‘down the track’, but at the time, it was revolutionary.

Angelo Notaras recognised immediately that the idea was brilliant. He and John agreed to provide a substantial sum as seed capital to establish the web-site. With his contribution, and his imprimatur, the site became operational very quickly. In the past 10 years the site content has grown to almost 18,000 entries. It is construed as the ‘Encyclopaedia Kytherianika’ in the world, as well as an electronic museum of Kythera. Major encyclopaedias utilise its content. It is used by many universities for educational purposes and has already been the subject of a Master’s and Ph.D thesis. It is the envy of other Greek-Australian, and cultural institutions in Australia, and around the world. (See the original ‘prospectus’ form for the website which accompanies this nomination).
In 2005, Angelo Notaras was instrumental in setting up the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. (A 4-page brochure, summarising the achievements of the KWHF to 2010 is included with this nomination). The main aim of the fund was to preserve the Kytherian heritage for the benefit of Kytherians worldwide.

Kytherian World Heritage Fund

The work of the fund grew out of Angelo Notaras’ initiative, along with brothers John and Mitchell, to personally fund, the publication of former Ambassador to Greece, Hugh Gilchrist’s comprehensive historical research, detailing the relationship between Greeks and Australians. Australians and Greeks, Volume 1 was published in 1992. A large print run of 5000 units was produced.

Angelo Notaras also contributed funds to the second volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 2 published in 1997. And to the third volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 3, published in 2004. The three volumes are the definitive history of the Greek presence in Australia.
Since 1992, under Angelo Notaras’ stewardship, the KWHF has gradually evolved into a minor publishing house, with 22 books on its publication list. Over time the KWHF has either published, or been heavily associated with the best three volumes of the history of the Greeks in Australia, as well as the best individual volumes on Greek Life in Australia in 1916, Greeks in Queensland, Greeks in Australian Cafes, Greeks in Australian cinemas, and the Greeks relationship with the Australian military. Excellent individual biographies and life stories of Greek and Kytherian Australians also form part of the publication list. As does a very good Greek cookbook.

Kytherian history is also well represented. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund have produced a general history of Kythera, and specific histories of Kythera under British occupation, the origins of Kytherian Surnames, the history of the town of Potamos, books of vintage photographs taken on Kythera during the early part of the twentieth century, and the best DVD historical and tourist guide for Kythera, ever produced. All are in print, and available.

In 2012, KWHF plans to print four additional books, including Kytherian Surnames, which traces the derivation of every Kytherian surname, and a photographic book, detailing the island of Kythera from the air.

A book list can be downloaded at
/download/KWHFBookPriceList.pdf

Kytherian Photography & Realia. The plate glass negative collection of Panayotis Fatseas – 1,800 valuable prints – which would have been lost to posterity, without the intervention of Angelo Notaras (Sydney), the Kythera Cultural Association, (Potamos, Kythera), under the Directorship of John Stathatos, and the KWHF. Plate glass negatives photographs taken on Kythera from the 1920’s to 1940’s were deteriorating in a storeroom on the island. Angelo Notaras provided computers, scanners, printers, archiving material, and secure storage containers for this important preservation project. This led to a major exhibition at the prestigious Benaki Museum, Athens, in 2008, and to the publication of Panayotis Fatseas. Faces of Kythera, 1920-1938. (2008).
Angelo Notaras has also been involved with a number of Special Projects on the island of Kythera.

Eye Clinic on Kythera. KWHF provided some input into conceiving the idea. It was actioned by Professor Minas Coroneo, Professor of Ophthalmology, University of NSW. Minas mobilised ophthalmologists and optometrists from Europe and Australia, brought sophisticated equipment to the island, and tested the eye sight of many residents, and treated their eyes, en masse.

Medical Equipment containers to Kythera for distribution to the Hospital (Potamos), and Aged Care Facility, (Potamos). Financial and logistical aid in collecting, packing, and shipping beds, with internal moving parts, and equipment to enhance resident and patient mobility on the island. A 20ft container was sent in 2007, and a 40ft container in 2009. This should provide the residents on the island of Kythera with access to wheel chairs and other aids, for years to come.

Library Shelving for Kythera. Logistical and financial support to despatch library shelving, from Alhambra, Los Angeles, USA, to Kythera. (2009). These shelves will form part of the first lending library to be instigated on the island of Kythera. The projects was instigated and superbly managed by Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, California, USA.

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).

Angelo Notaras joined the Board of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 2005 and has had a profound impact on its activities. He has made a significant contribution in both terms of advice to and mentoring of the younger members of the Board .

Since his appointment to the Board his influence has been widespread and includes the following:
Angelo has encouraged a sharper focus on cultural issues, particularly through www.kythera-family.net and the book publishing arm of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, with the result that the Association now expends far more funds on important cultural activities than it had done hitherto. As a result, many important works - in both the English and Greek language - have been published and made available for the first time.

With his proven business acumen, Angelo has provided wise counsel at the time the Association’s Board evaluated and purchased a building for investment purposes and for the creation of a substantial cultural resource centre and library in Rockdale known as Kythera House.

Angelo advised the Board on how to best achieve the refurbishment of Kythera House in order to provide a high quality cultural centre, which would be attractive to both members and friends of the Association, in order to promote greater use of the facility and the resources amongst members of the Kytherian and wider Greek-Australian community.

He has encouraged the setting up of record and account systems to increase the Association’s membership base.

Angelo has also determinedly pursued the revised and updating of the Association’s Constitution in order to help meet the needs of a 21st century cultural organisation.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 20.12.2012

Mary Notaras (nee Kalokerinos) with two of her grandchildren, Elizabeth & Alexandria

Elizabeth Notaras' parents are Anthony Notaras and Anna Sallos. Alexandra Notaras' parents are William and Monica Notaras.

Elizabeth & Alexandria gave speeches in recognition of their pappou's achievements on the evening.

On the occasion of Angelo Notaras receiving the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

On the 10th December, 2012, at a ceremony at the Athenian Restaurant, Barrack Street, Sydney, attended by family, friends, and members of the Committee of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Angelo Notaras was presented with the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

Kytherian Medal of Honour, Reverse side.

He was also presented with a Certificate of Recognition which read:

Hellenic Republic

Municipality of Kythera

Honorary Award

KYTHERIAN MEDAL OF HONOUR

To

Evangelos Notaras,

in recognition of his achievements for the Greek Orthodox Church

and his social and cultural contribution

to Greek-Australian & Kytherian Culture

both in Australia and in Kythera

Kythera, December 1, 2012,

The Mayor of Kythera

Theodore Koukoulis

The Medal of the Municipality of Kythera
awarded by Professor George Leontsinis,
Municipal Councillor,
Representative of the Municipality of Kythera

Angelo Notaras received the award for the following services:

Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).


Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera
.

In 2000 Angelo Notaras was a member of the Millennium Heritage Committee of the Greek Orthodox Church and of the Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame. The Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame ensured recognition for Australian athletes of Greek heritage who had represented Australia and had attained prominent positions in Australian sport. The Millennium Heritage Committee formed the Provicare Foundation, a charity established under the auspices of the Greek Orthodox Church to aid disadvantaged persons suffering from alcohol and drug addiction.

Funding for the Provicare Foundation was undertaken on an Australia-wide basis under the direction of Angelo Notaras and Father Steven Scoutas of St Spyridon Church, Kingsford. Angelo Notaras and Father Steven developed a proposal under which Angelo and John manufactured (all at their own cost) moulds to create thousands of hollow plastic batons, fashioned to resemble Greek columns, that were distributed to communities and parishes throughout Australia, to be filled with coin donations. They also coordinated the packaging, transport and delivery of the plastic batons to every single Greek Orthodox parish and community across Australia, as well as monitoring and accounting for the returns after nine months. The initial efforts raised $500,000 and, with subsequent distribution and collection of batons, the final fundraising amount totalled some $700,000. This amount has been used to further the aims of the Provicare Foundation, focusing particularly on the Sydney metropolitan area. The success of these achievements is principally due to the inspiration, financial support and commitment of Angelo Notaras.

Angelo Notaras also participated in further fundraising for the purposes of refurbishing premises provided by the NSW Government at Marine Parade, Brighton-le-Sands; a sum in excess of $100,000 was raised for the Provicare Foundation and the Greek Welfare Centre to provide social services to disadvantaged persons.

As a result of these acts of beneficence, Angelo was awarded the "Cross of St. Andrew", the Greek Orthodox Church's highest award. The medal was presented on 28 November 2003 for “valuable services to the Church and the community”. (A photograph of Angelo Notaras, with wife Mary, taken on the day of presentation, is included with this nomination).
Services to the island of Kythera, Greece, and the Greek-Australian and Kytherian-Australian community.

Kythera is a small island that lies at the tip of the Peloponnese in southern Greece. The large island of Crete is located to the South of Kythera. Since 1854, a majority of the islands’ residents have chosen to migrate to Australia. 3000 Kytherians live on the island. There are 60,000 Kytherians and their descendants’ resident in Australia.

In 2003 James Prineas, a Kytherian-Australian living in Germany, devised the concept of an electronic cultural archive, based on an open access web-site. He proposed that www.kythera-family.net be established, and that instead of being based on the ‘standard’ principle of a ‘central’ web master, monitoring and ordering web content – the kythera-family site should be accessible to all. Kytherians from all around the world were empowered to upload photographs, stories and audio-files, directly onto the site. The concept sounds passé, 10 years ‘down the track’, but at the time, it was revolutionary.

Angelo Notaras recognised immediately that the idea was brilliant. He and John agreed to provide a substantial sum as seed capital to establish the web-site. With his contribution, and his imprimatur, the site became operational very quickly. In the past 10 years the site content has grown to almost 18,000 entries. It is construed as the ‘Encyclopaedia Kytherianika’ in the world, as well as an electronic museum of Kythera. Major encyclopaedias utilise its content. It is used by many universities for educational purposes and has already been the subject of a Master’s and Ph.D thesis. It is the envy of other Greek-Australian, and cultural institutions in Australia, and around the world. (See the original ‘prospectus’ form for the website which accompanies this nomination).
In 2005, Angelo Notaras was instrumental in setting up the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. (A 4-page brochure, summarising the achievements of the KWHF to 2010 is included with this nomination). The main aim of the fund was to preserve the Kytherian heritage for the benefit of Kytherians worldwide.

Kytherian World Heritage Fund

The work of the fund grew out of Angelo Notaras’ initiative, along with brothers John and Mitchell, to personally fund, the publication of former Ambassador to Greece, Hugh Gilchrist’s comprehensive historical research, detailing the relationship between Greeks and Australians. Australians and Greeks, Volume 1 was published in 1992. A large print run of 5000 units was produced.

Angelo Notaras also contributed funds to the second volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 2 published in 1997. And to the third volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 3, published in 2004. The three volumes are the definitive history of the Greek presence in Australia.
Since 1992, under Angelo Notaras’ stewardship, the KWHF has gradually evolved into a minor publishing house, with 22 books on its publication list. Over time the KWHF has either published, or been heavily associated with the best three volumes of the history of the Greeks in Australia, as well as the best individual volumes on Greek Life in Australia in 1916, Greeks in Queensland, Greeks in Australian Cafes, Greeks in Australian cinemas, and the Greeks relationship with the Australian military. Excellent individual biographies and life stories of Greek and Kytherian Australians also form part of the publication list. As does a very good Greek cookbook.

Kytherian history is also well represented. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund have produced a general history of Kythera, and specific histories of Kythera under British occupation, the origins of Kytherian Surnames, the history of the town of Potamos, books of vintage photographs taken on Kythera during the early part of the twentieth century, and the best DVD historical and tourist guide for Kythera, ever produced. All are in print, and available.

In 2012, KWHF plans to print four additional books, including Kytherian Surnames, which traces the derivation of every Kytherian surname, and a photographic book, detailing the island of Kythera from the air.

A book list can be downloaded at
/download/KWHFBookPriceList.pdf

Kytherian Photography & Realia. The plate glass negative collection of Panayotis Fatseas – 1,800 valuable prints – which would have been lost to posterity, without the intervention of Angelo Notaras (Sydney), the Kythera Cultural Association, (Potamos, Kythera), under the Directorship of John Stathatos, and the KWHF. Plate glass negatives photographs taken on Kythera from the 1920’s to 1940’s were deteriorating in a storeroom on the island. Angelo Notaras provided computers, scanners, printers, archiving material, and secure storage containers for this important preservation project. This led to a major exhibition at the prestigious Benaki Museum, Athens, in 2008, and to the publication of Panayotis Fatseas. Faces of Kythera, 1920-1938. (2008).
Angelo Notaras has also been involved with a number of Special Projects on the island of Kythera.

Eye Clinic on Kythera. KWHF provided some input into conceiving the idea. It was actioned by Professor Minas Coroneo, Professor of Ophthalmology, University of NSW. Minas mobilised ophthalmologists and optometrists from Europe and Australia, brought sophisticated equipment to the island, and tested the eye sight of many residents, and treated their eyes, en masse.

Medical Equipment containers to Kythera for distribution to the Hospital (Potamos), and Aged Care Facility, (Potamos). Financial and logistical aid in collecting, packing, and shipping beds, with internal moving parts, and equipment to enhance resident and patient mobility on the island. A 20ft container was sent in 2007, and a 40ft container in 2009. This should provide the residents on the island of Kythera with access to wheel chairs and other aids, for years to come.

Library Shelving for Kythera. Logistical and financial support to despatch library shelving, from Alhambra, Los Angeles, USA, to Kythera. (2009). These shelves will form part of the first lending library to be instigated on the island of Kythera. The projects was instigated and superbly managed by Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, California, USA.

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).

Angelo Notaras joined the Board of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 2005 and has had a profound impact on its activities. He has made a significant contribution in both terms of advice to and mentoring of the younger members of the Board .

Since his appointment to the Board his influence has been widespread and includes the following:
Angelo has encouraged a sharper focus on cultural issues, particularly through www.kythera-family.net and the book publishing arm of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, with the result that the Association now expends far more funds on important cultural activities than it had done hitherto. As a result, many important works - in both the English and Greek language - have been published and made available for the first time.

With his proven business acumen, Angelo has provided wise counsel at the time the Association’s Board evaluated and purchased a building for investment purposes and for the creation of a substantial cultural resource centre and library in Rockdale known as Kythera House.

Angelo advised the Board on how to best achieve the refurbishment of Kythera House in order to provide a high quality cultural centre, which would be attractive to both members and friends of the Association, in order to promote greater use of the facility and the resources amongst members of the Kytherian and wider Greek-Australian community.

He has encouraged the setting up of record and account systems to increase the Association’s membership base.

Angelo has also determinedly pursued the revised and updating of the Association’s Constitution in order to help meet the needs of a 21st century cultural organisation.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 20.12.2012

Angelo Notaras surrounded by his grandchildren

From the back – the two older children are Charlie and Mia Toda, children of Anthea.

On the right hand side is Mariana Notaras whose parents are William and Monica Notaras.

The 'littlies' are Elizabeth, whose parents are Anthony Notaras and Anna Sallos, and Alexandra whose parents are William and Monica Notaras, and then Nicholas whose parents are Anthony Notaras and Anna Sallos.

Angelo Notaras's entire family attended this important ceremony.

On the 10th December, 2012, at a ceremony at the Athenian Restaurant, Barrack Street, Sydney, attended by family, friends, and members of the Committee of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Angelo Notaras was presented with the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

Kytherian Medal of Honour, Reverse side.

He was also presented with a Certificate of Recognition which read:

Hellenic Republic

Municipality of Kythera

Honorary Award

KYTHERIAN MEDAL OF HONOUR

To

Evangelos Notaras,

in recognition of his achievements for the Greek Orthodox Church

and his social and cultural contribution

to Greek-Australian & Kytherian Culture

both in Australia and in Kythera

Kythera, December 1, 2012,

The Mayor of Kythera

Theodore Koukoulis

The Medal of the Municipality of Kythera
awarded by Professor George Leontsinis,
Municipal Councillor,
Representative of the Municipality of Kythera

Angelo Notaras received the award for the following services:

Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).


Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera
.

In 2000 Angelo Notaras was a member of the Millennium Heritage Committee of the Greek Orthodox Church and of the Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame. The Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame ensured recognition for Australian athletes of Greek heritage who had represented Australia and had attained prominent positions in Australian sport. The Millennium Heritage Committee formed the Provicare Foundation, a charity established under the auspices of the Greek Orthodox Church to aid disadvantaged persons suffering from alcohol and drug addiction.

Funding for the Provicare Foundation was undertaken on an Australia-wide basis under the direction of Angelo Notaras and Father Steven Scoutas of St Spyridon Church, Kingsford. Angelo Notaras and Father Steven developed a proposal under which Angelo and John manufactured (all at their own cost) moulds to create thousands of hollow plastic batons, fashioned to resemble Greek columns, that were distributed to communities and parishes throughout Australia, to be filled with coin donations. They also coordinated the packaging, transport and delivery of the plastic batons to every single Greek Orthodox parish and community across Australia, as well as monitoring and accounting for the returns after nine months. The initial efforts raised $500,000 and, with subsequent distribution and collection of batons, the final fundraising amount totalled some $700,000. This amount has been used to further the aims of the Provicare Foundation, focusing particularly on the Sydney metropolitan area. The success of these achievements is principally due to the inspiration, financial support and commitment of Angelo Notaras.

Angelo Notaras also participated in further fundraising for the purposes of refurbishing premises provided by the NSW Government at Marine Parade, Brighton-le-Sands; a sum in excess of $100,000 was raised for the Provicare Foundation and the Greek Welfare Centre to provide social services to disadvantaged persons.

As a result of these acts of beneficence, Angelo was awarded the "Cross of St. Andrew", the Greek Orthodox Church's highest award. The medal was presented on 28 November 2003 for “valuable services to the Church and the community”. (A photograph of Angelo Notaras, with wife Mary, taken on the day of presentation, is included with this nomination).
Services to the island of Kythera, Greece, and the Greek-Australian and Kytherian-Australian community.

Kythera is a small island that lies at the tip of the Peloponnese in southern Greece. The large island of Crete is located to the South of Kythera. Since 1854, a majority of the islands’ residents have chosen to migrate to Australia. 3000 Kytherians live on the island. There are 60,000 Kytherians and their descendants’ resident in Australia.

In 2003 James Prineas, a Kytherian-Australian living in Germany, devised the concept of an electronic cultural archive, based on an open access web-site. He proposed that www.kythera-family.net be established, and that instead of being based on the ‘standard’ principle of a ‘central’ web master, monitoring and ordering web content – the kythera-family site should be accessible to all. Kytherians from all around the world were empowered to upload photographs, stories and audio-files, directly onto the site. The concept sounds passé, 10 years ‘down the track’, but at the time, it was revolutionary.

Angelo Notaras recognised immediately that the idea was brilliant. He and John agreed to provide a substantial sum as seed capital to establish the web-site. With his contribution, and his imprimatur, the site became operational very quickly. In the past 10 years the site content has grown to almost 18,000 entries. It is construed as the ‘Encyclopaedia Kytherianika’ in the world, as well as an electronic museum of Kythera. Major encyclopaedias utilise its content. It is used by many universities for educational purposes and has already been the subject of a Master’s and Ph.D thesis. It is the envy of other Greek-Australian, and cultural institutions in Australia, and around the world. (See the original ‘prospectus’ form for the website which accompanies this nomination).
In 2005, Angelo Notaras was instrumental in setting up the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. (A 4-page brochure, summarising the achievements of the KWHF to 2010 is included with this nomination). The main aim of the fund was to preserve the Kytherian heritage for the benefit of Kytherians worldwide.

Kytherian World Heritage Fund

The work of the fund grew out of Angelo Notaras’ initiative, along with brothers John and Mitchell, to personally fund, the publication of former Ambassador to Greece, Hugh Gilchrist’s comprehensive historical research, detailing the relationship between Greeks and Australians. Australians and Greeks, Volume 1 was published in 1992. A large print run of 5000 units was produced.

Angelo Notaras also contributed funds to the second volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 2 published in 1997. And to the third volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 3, published in 2004. The three volumes are the definitive history of the Greek presence in Australia.
Since 1992, under Angelo Notaras’ stewardship, the KWHF has gradually evolved into a minor publishing house, with 22 books on its publication list. Over time the KWHF has either published, or been heavily associated with the best three volumes of the history of the Greeks in Australia, as well as the best individual volumes on Greek Life in Australia in 1916, Greeks in Queensland, Greeks in Australian Cafes, Greeks in Australian cinemas, and the Greeks relationship with the Australian military. Excellent individual biographies and life stories of Greek and Kytherian Australians also form part of the publication list. As does a very good Greek cookbook.

Kytherian history is also well represented. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund have produced a general history of Kythera, and specific histories of Kythera under British occupation, the origins of Kytherian Surnames, the history of the town of Potamos, books of vintage photographs taken on Kythera during the early part of the twentieth century, and the best DVD historical and tourist guide for Kythera, ever produced. All are in print, and available.

In 2012, KWHF plans to print four additional books, including Kytherian Surnames, which traces the derivation of every Kytherian surname, and a photographic book, detailing the island of Kythera from the air.

A book list can be downloaded at
/download/KWHFBookPriceList.pdf

Kytherian Photography & Realia. The plate glass negative collection of Panayotis Fatseas – 1,800 valuable prints – which would have been lost to posterity, without the intervention of Angelo Notaras (Sydney), the Kythera Cultural Association, (Potamos, Kythera), under the Directorship of John Stathatos, and the KWHF. Plate glass negatives photographs taken on Kythera from the 1920’s to 1940’s were deteriorating in a storeroom on the island. Angelo Notaras provided computers, scanners, printers, archiving material, and secure storage containers for this important preservation project. This led to a major exhibition at the prestigious Benaki Museum, Athens, in 2008, and to the publication of Panayotis Fatseas. Faces of Kythera, 1920-1938. (2008).
Angelo Notaras has also been involved with a number of Special Projects on the island of Kythera.

Eye Clinic on Kythera. KWHF provided some input into conceiving the idea. It was actioned by Professor Minas Coroneo, Professor of Ophthalmology, University of NSW. Minas mobilised ophthalmologists and optometrists from Europe and Australia, brought sophisticated equipment to the island, and tested the eye sight of many residents, and treated their eyes, en masse.

Medical Equipment containers to Kythera for distribution to the Hospital (Potamos), and Aged Care Facility, (Potamos). Financial and logistical aid in collecting, packing, and shipping beds, with internal moving parts, and equipment to enhance resident and patient mobility on the island. A 20ft container was sent in 2007, and a 40ft container in 2009. This should provide the residents on the island of Kythera with access to wheel chairs and other aids, for years to come.

Library Shelving for Kythera. Logistical and financial support to despatch library shelving, from Alhambra, Los Angeles, USA, to Kythera. (2009). These shelves will form part of the first lending library to be instigated on the island of Kythera. The projects was instigated and superbly managed by Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, California, USA.

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).

Angelo Notaras joined the Board of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 2005 and has had a profound impact on its activities. He has made a significant contribution in both terms of advice to and mentoring of the younger members of the Board .

Since his appointment to the Board his influence has been widespread and includes the following:
Angelo has encouraged a sharper focus on cultural issues, particularly through www.kythera-family.net and the book publishing arm of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, with the result that the Association now expends far more funds on important cultural activities than it had done hitherto. As a result, many important works - in both the English and Greek language - have been published and made available for the first time.

With his proven business acumen, Angelo has provided wise counsel at the time the Association’s Board evaluated and purchased a building for investment purposes and for the creation of a substantial cultural resource centre and library in Rockdale known as Kythera House.

Angelo advised the Board on how to best achieve the refurbishment of Kythera House in order to provide a high quality cultural centre, which would be attractive to both members and friends of the Association, in order to promote greater use of the facility and the resources amongst members of the Kytherian and wider Greek-Australian community.

He has encouraged the setting up of record and account systems to increase the Association’s membership base.

Angelo has also determinedly pursued the revised and updating of the Association’s Constitution in order to help meet the needs of a 21st century cultural organisation.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 20.12.2012

John Comino, Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) & Paul Summers

On the occasion of Angelo Notaras receiving the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

Betty is Angelo Notaras's youngest sister.

Paul is holding up the first draft of the English translation of Kosmas Megalokonomos' History of Potamos. Kosmas is a cousin to Angelo and Betty. The book will be mass printed shortly, and will be available for sale through the Kytherian World Heritage Fund

On the 10th December, 2012, at a ceremony at the Athenian Restaurant, Barrack Street, Sydney, attended by family, friends, and members of the Committee of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Angelo Notaras was presented with the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

Kytherian Medal of Honour, Reverse side.

He was also presented with a Certificate of Recognition which read:

Hellenic Republic

Municipality of Kythera

Honorary Award

KYTHERIAN MEDAL OF HONOUR

To

Evangelos Notaras,

in recognition of his achievements for the Greek Orthodox Church

and his social and cultural contribution

to Greek-Australian & Kytherian Culture

both in Australia and in Kythera

Kythera, December 1, 2012,

The Mayor of Kythera

Theodore Koukoulis

The Medal of the Municipality of Kythera
awarded by Professor George Leontsinis,
Municipal Councillor,
Representative of the Municipality of Kythera

Angelo Notaras received the award for the following services:

Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).


Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera
.

In 2000 Angelo Notaras was a member of the Millennium Heritage Committee of the Greek Orthodox Church and of the Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame. The Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame ensured recognition for Australian athletes of Greek heritage who had represented Australia and had attained prominent positions in Australian sport. The Millennium Heritage Committee formed the Provicare Foundation, a charity established under the auspices of the Greek Orthodox Church to aid disadvantaged persons suffering from alcohol and drug addiction.

Funding for the Provicare Foundation was undertaken on an Australia-wide basis under the direction of Angelo Notaras and Father Steven Scoutas of St Spyridon Church, Kingsford. Angelo Notaras and Father Steven developed a proposal under which Angelo and John manufactured (all at their own cost) moulds to create thousands of hollow plastic batons, fashioned to resemble Greek columns, that were distributed to communities and parishes throughout Australia, to be filled with coin donations. They also coordinated the packaging, transport and delivery of the plastic batons to every single Greek Orthodox parish and community across Australia, as well as monitoring and accounting for the returns after nine months. The initial efforts raised $500,000 and, with subsequent distribution and collection of batons, the final fundraising amount totalled some $700,000. This amount has been used to further the aims of the Provicare Foundation, focusing particularly on the Sydney metropolitan area. The success of these achievements is principally due to the inspiration, financial support and commitment of Angelo Notaras.

Angelo Notaras also participated in further fundraising for the purposes of refurbishing premises provided by the NSW Government at Marine Parade, Brighton-le-Sands; a sum in excess of $100,000 was raised for the Provicare Foundation and the Greek Welfare Centre to provide social services to disadvantaged persons.

As a result of these acts of beneficence, Angelo was awarded the "Cross of St. Andrew", the Greek Orthodox Church's highest award. The medal was presented on 28 November 2003 for “valuable services to the Church and the community”. (A photograph of Angelo Notaras, with wife Mary, taken on the day of presentation, is included with this nomination).
Services to the island of Kythera, Greece, and the Greek-Australian and Kytherian-Australian community.

Kythera is a small island that lies at the tip of the Peloponnese in southern Greece. The large island of Crete is located to the South of Kythera. Since 1854, a majority of the islands’ residents have chosen to migrate to Australia. 3000 Kytherians live on the island. There are 60,000 Kytherians and their descendants’ resident in Australia.

In 2003 James Prineas, a Kytherian-Australian living in Germany, devised the concept of an electronic cultural archive, based on an open access web-site. He proposed that www.kythera-family.net be established, and that instead of being based on the ‘standard’ principle of a ‘central’ web master, monitoring and ordering web content – the kythera-family site should be accessible to all. Kytherians from all around the world were empowered to upload photographs, stories and audio-files, directly onto the site. The concept sounds passé, 10 years ‘down the track’, but at the time, it was revolutionary.

Angelo Notaras recognised immediately that the idea was brilliant. He and John agreed to provide a substantial sum as seed capital to establish the web-site. With his contribution, and his imprimatur, the site became operational very quickly. In the past 10 years the site content has grown to almost 18,000 entries. It is construed as the ‘Encyclopaedia Kytherianika’ in the world, as well as an electronic museum of Kythera. Major encyclopaedias utilise its content. It is used by many universities for educational purposes and has already been the subject of a Master’s and Ph.D thesis. It is the envy of other Greek-Australian, and cultural institutions in Australia, and around the world. (See the original ‘prospectus’ form for the website which accompanies this nomination).
In 2005, Angelo Notaras was instrumental in setting up the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. (A 4-page brochure, summarising the achievements of the KWHF to 2010 is included with this nomination). The main aim of the fund was to preserve the Kytherian heritage for the benefit of Kytherians worldwide.

Kytherian World Heritage Fund

The work of the fund grew out of Angelo Notaras’ initiative, along with brothers John and Mitchell, to personally fund, the publication of former Ambassador to Greece, Hugh Gilchrist’s comprehensive historical research, detailing the relationship between Greeks and Australians. Australians and Greeks, Volume 1 was published in 1992. A large print run of 5000 units was produced.

Angelo Notaras also contributed funds to the second volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 2 published in 1997. And to the third volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 3, published in 2004. The three volumes are the definitive history of the Greek presence in Australia.
Since 1992, under Angelo Notaras’ stewardship, the KWHF has gradually evolved into a minor publishing house, with 22 books on its publication list. Over time the KWHF has either published, or been heavily associated with the best three volumes of the history of the Greeks in Australia, as well as the best individual volumes on Greek Life in Australia in 1916, Greeks in Queensland, Greeks in Australian Cafes, Greeks in Australian cinemas, and the Greeks relationship with the Australian military. Excellent individual biographies and life stories of Greek and Kytherian Australians also form part of the publication list. As does a very good Greek cookbook.

Kytherian history is also well represented. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund have produced a general history of Kythera, and specific histories of Kythera under British occupation, the origins of Kytherian Surnames, the history of the town of Potamos, books of vintage photographs taken on Kythera during the early part of the twentieth century, and the best DVD historical and tourist guide for Kythera, ever produced. All are in print, and available.

In 2012, KWHF plans to print four additional books, including Kytherian Surnames, which traces the derivation of every Kytherian surname, and a photographic book, detailing the island of Kythera from the air.

A book list can be downloaded at
/download/KWHFBookPriceList.pdf

Kytherian Photography & Realia. The plate glass negative collection of Panayotis Fatseas – 1,800 valuable prints – which would have been lost to posterity, without the intervention of Angelo Notaras (Sydney), the Kythera Cultural Association, (Potamos, Kythera), under the Directorship of John Stathatos, and the KWHF. Plate glass negatives photographs taken on Kythera from the 1920’s to 1940’s were deteriorating in a storeroom on the island. Angelo Notaras provided computers, scanners, printers, archiving material, and secure storage containers for this important preservation project. This led to a major exhibition at the prestigious Benaki Museum, Athens, in 2008, and to the publication of Panayotis Fatseas. Faces of Kythera, 1920-1938. (2008).
Angelo Notaras has also been involved with a number of Special Projects on the island of Kythera.

Eye Clinic on Kythera. KWHF provided some input into conceiving the idea. It was actioned by Professor Minas Coroneo, Professor of Ophthalmology, University of NSW. Minas mobilised ophthalmologists and optometrists from Europe and Australia, brought sophisticated equipment to the island, and tested the eye sight of many residents, and treated their eyes, en masse.

Medical Equipment containers to Kythera for distribution to the Hospital (Potamos), and Aged Care Facility, (Potamos). Financial and logistical aid in collecting, packing, and shipping beds, with internal moving parts, and equipment to enhance resident and patient mobility on the island. A 20ft container was sent in 2007, and a 40ft container in 2009. This should provide the residents on the island of Kythera with access to wheel chairs and other aids, for years to come.

Library Shelving for Kythera. Logistical and financial support to despatch library shelving, from Alhambra, Los Angeles, USA, to Kythera. (2009). These shelves will form part of the first lending library to be instigated on the island of Kythera. The projects was instigated and superbly managed by Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, California, USA.

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).

Angelo Notaras joined the Board of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 2005 and has had a profound impact on its activities. He has made a significant contribution in both terms of advice to and mentoring of the younger members of the Board .

Since his appointment to the Board his influence has been widespread and includes the following:
Angelo has encouraged a sharper focus on cultural issues, particularly through www.kythera-family.net and the book publishing arm of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, with the result that the Association now expends far more funds on important cultural activities than it had done hitherto. As a result, many important works - in both the English and Greek language - have been published and made available for the first time.

With his proven business acumen, Angelo has provided wise counsel at the time the Association’s Board evaluated and purchased a building for investment purposes and for the creation of a substantial cultural resource centre and library in Rockdale known as Kythera House.

Angelo advised the Board on how to best achieve the refurbishment of Kythera House in order to provide a high quality cultural centre, which would be attractive to both members and friends of the Association, in order to promote greater use of the facility and the resources amongst members of the Kytherian and wider Greek-Australian community.

He has encouraged the setting up of record and account systems to increase the Association’s membership base.

Angelo has also determinedly pursued the revised and updating of the Association’s Constitution in order to help meet the needs of a 21st century cultural organisation.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 20.12.2012

Angelo Notaras, with good friends Rene Condoleon, and Irinie and Angelo Crones

On the occasion of Angelo Notaras receiving the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

On the 10th December, 2012, at a ceremony at the Athenian Restaurant, Barrack Street, Sydney, attended by family, friends, and members of the Committee of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Angelo Notaras was presented with the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

Kytherian Medal of Honour, Reverse side.

He was also presented with a Certificate of Recognition which read:

Hellenic Republic

Municipality of Kythera

Honorary Award

KYTHERIAN MEDAL OF HONOUR

To

Evangelos Notaras,

in recognition of his achievements for the Greek Orthodox Church

and his social and cultural contribution

to Greek-Australian & Kytherian Culture

both in Australia and in Kythera

Kythera, December 1, 2012,

The Mayor of Kythera

Theodore Koukoulis

The Medal of the Municipality of Kythera
awarded by Professor George Leontsinis,
Municipal Councillor,
Representative of the Municipality of Kythera

Angelo Notaras received the award for the following services:

Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).


Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera
.

In 2000 Angelo Notaras was a member of the Millennium Heritage Committee of the Greek Orthodox Church and of the Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame. The Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame ensured recognition for Australian athletes of Greek heritage who had represented Australia and had attained prominent positions in Australian sport. The Millennium Heritage Committee formed the Provicare Foundation, a charity established under the auspices of the Greek Orthodox Church to aid disadvantaged persons suffering from alcohol and drug addiction.

Funding for the Provicare Foundation was undertaken on an Australia-wide basis under the direction of Angelo Notaras and Father Steven Scoutas of St Spyridon Church, Kingsford. Angelo Notaras and Father Steven developed a proposal under which Angelo and John manufactured (all at their own cost) moulds to create thousands of hollow plastic batons, fashioned to resemble Greek columns, that were distributed to communities and parishes throughout Australia, to be filled with coin donations. They also coordinated the packaging, transport and delivery of the plastic batons to every single Greek Orthodox parish and community across Australia, as well as monitoring and accounting for the returns after nine months. The initial efforts raised $500,000 and, with subsequent distribution and collection of batons, the final fundraising amount totalled some $700,000. This amount has been used to further the aims of the Provicare Foundation, focusing particularly on the Sydney metropolitan area. The success of these achievements is principally due to the inspiration, financial support and commitment of Angelo Notaras.

Angelo Notaras also participated in further fundraising for the purposes of refurbishing premises provided by the NSW Government at Marine Parade, Brighton-le-Sands; a sum in excess of $100,000 was raised for the Provicare Foundation and the Greek Welfare Centre to provide social services to disadvantaged persons.

As a result of these acts of beneficence, Angelo was awarded the "Cross of St. Andrew", the Greek Orthodox Church's highest award. The medal was presented on 28 November 2003 for “valuable services to the Church and the community”. (A photograph of Angelo Notaras, with wife Mary, taken on the day of presentation, is included with this nomination).
Services to the island of Kythera, Greece, and the Greek-Australian and Kytherian-Australian community.

Kythera is a small island that lies at the tip of the Peloponnese in southern Greece. The large island of Crete is located to the South of Kythera. Since 1854, a majority of the islands’ residents have chosen to migrate to Australia. 3000 Kytherians live on the island. There are 60,000 Kytherians and their descendants’ resident in Australia.

In 2003 James Prineas, a Kytherian-Australian living in Germany, devised the concept of an electronic cultural archive, based on an open access web-site. He proposed that www.kythera-family.net be established, and that instead of being based on the ‘standard’ principle of a ‘central’ web master, monitoring and ordering web content – the kythera-family site should be accessible to all. Kytherians from all around the world were empowered to upload photographs, stories and audio-files, directly onto the site. The concept sounds passé, 10 years ‘down the track’, but at the time, it was revolutionary.

Angelo Notaras recognised immediately that the idea was brilliant. He and John agreed to provide a substantial sum as seed capital to establish the web-site. With his contribution, and his imprimatur, the site became operational very quickly. In the past 10 years the site content has grown to almost 18,000 entries. It is construed as the ‘Encyclopaedia Kytherianika’ in the world, as well as an electronic museum of Kythera. Major encyclopaedias utilise its content. It is used by many universities for educational purposes and has already been the subject of a Master’s and Ph.D thesis. It is the envy of other Greek-Australian, and cultural institutions in Australia, and around the world. (See the original ‘prospectus’ form for the website which accompanies this nomination).
In 2005, Angelo Notaras was instrumental in setting up the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. (A 4-page brochure, summarising the achievements of the KWHF to 2010 is included with this nomination). The main aim of the fund was to preserve the Kytherian heritage for the benefit of Kytherians worldwide.

Kytherian World Heritage Fund

The work of the fund grew out of Angelo Notaras’ initiative, along with brothers John and Mitchell, to personally fund, the publication of former Ambassador to Greece, Hugh Gilchrist’s comprehensive historical research, detailing the relationship between Greeks and Australians. Australians and Greeks, Volume 1 was published in 1992. A large print run of 5000 units was produced.

Angelo Notaras also contributed funds to the second volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 2 published in 1997. And to the third volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 3, published in 2004. The three volumes are the definitive history of the Greek presence in Australia.
Since 1992, under Angelo Notaras’ stewardship, the KWHF has gradually evolved into a minor publishing house, with 22 books on its publication list. Over time the KWHF has either published, or been heavily associated with the best three volumes of the history of the Greeks in Australia, as well as the best individual volumes on Greek Life in Australia in 1916, Greeks in Queensland, Greeks in Australian Cafes, Greeks in Australian cinemas, and the Greeks relationship with the Australian military. Excellent individual biographies and life stories of Greek and Kytherian Australians also form part of the publication list. As does a very good Greek cookbook.

Kytherian history is also well represented. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund have produced a general history of Kythera, and specific histories of Kythera under British occupation, the origins of Kytherian Surnames, the history of the town of Potamos, books of vintage photographs taken on Kythera during the early part of the twentieth century, and the best DVD historical and tourist guide for Kythera, ever produced. All are in print, and available.

In 2012, KWHF plans to print four additional books, including Kytherian Surnames, which traces the derivation of every Kytherian surname, and a photographic book, detailing the island of Kythera from the air.

A book list can be downloaded at
/download/KWHFBookPriceList.pdf

Kytherian Photography & Realia. The plate glass negative collection of Panayotis Fatseas – 1,800 valuable prints – which would have been lost to posterity, without the intervention of Angelo Notaras (Sydney), the Kythera Cultural Association, (Potamos, Kythera), under the Directorship of John Stathatos, and the KWHF. Plate glass negatives photographs taken on Kythera from the 1920’s to 1940’s were deteriorating in a storeroom on the island. Angelo Notaras provided computers, scanners, printers, archiving material, and secure storage containers for this important preservation project. This led to a major exhibition at the prestigious Benaki Museum, Athens, in 2008, and to the publication of Panayotis Fatseas. Faces of Kythera, 1920-1938. (2008).
Angelo Notaras has also been involved with a number of Special Projects on the island of Kythera.

Eye Clinic on Kythera. KWHF provided some input into conceiving the idea. It was actioned by Professor Minas Coroneo, Professor of Ophthalmology, University of NSW. Minas mobilised ophthalmologists and optometrists from Europe and Australia, brought sophisticated equipment to the island, and tested the eye sight of many residents, and treated their eyes, en masse.

Medical Equipment containers to Kythera for distribution to the Hospital (Potamos), and Aged Care Facility, (Potamos). Financial and logistical aid in collecting, packing, and shipping beds, with internal moving parts, and equipment to enhance resident and patient mobility on the island. A 20ft container was sent in 2007, and a 40ft container in 2009. This should provide the residents on the island of Kythera with access to wheel chairs and other aids, for years to come.

Library Shelving for Kythera. Logistical and financial support to despatch library shelving, from Alhambra, Los Angeles, USA, to Kythera. (2009). These shelves will form part of the first lending library to be instigated on the island of Kythera. The projects was instigated and superbly managed by Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, California, USA.

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).

Angelo Notaras joined the Board of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 2005 and has had a profound impact on its activities. He has made a significant contribution in both terms of advice to and mentoring of the younger members of the Board .

Since his appointment to the Board his influence has been widespread and includes the following:
Angelo has encouraged a sharper focus on cultural issues, particularly through www.kythera-family.net and the book publishing arm of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, with the result that the Association now expends far more funds on important cultural activities than it had done hitherto. As a result, many important works - in both the English and Greek language - have been published and made available for the first time.

With his proven business acumen, Angelo has provided wise counsel at the time the Association’s Board evaluated and purchased a building for investment purposes and for the creation of a substantial cultural resource centre and library in Rockdale known as Kythera House.

Angelo advised the Board on how to best achieve the refurbishment of Kythera House in order to provide a high quality cultural centre, which would be attractive to both members and friends of the Association, in order to promote greater use of the facility and the resources amongst members of the Kytherian and wider Greek-Australian community.

He has encouraged the setting up of record and account systems to increase the Association’s membership base.

Angelo has also determinedly pursued the revised and updating of the Association’s Constitution in order to help meet the needs of a 21st century cultural organisation.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 20.12.2012

Professor George Leontsinis, who is also a Councillor on the Municipality of Kythera Council

....making the speech before conferring upon Angelo Notaras, the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

On the 10th December, 2012, at a ceremony at the Athenian Restaurant, Barrack Street, Sydney, attended by family, friends, and members of the Committee of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Angelo Notaras was presented with the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

Kytherian Medal of Honour, Reverse side.

He was also presented with a Certificate of Recognition which read:

Hellenic Republic

Municipality of Kythera

Honorary Award

KYTHERIAN MEDAL OF HONOUR

To

Evangelos Notaras,

in recognition of his achievements for the Greek Orthodox Church

and his social and cultural contribution

to Greek-Australian & Kytherian Culture

both in Australia and in Kythera

Kythera, December 1, 2012,

The Mayor of Kythera

Theodore Koukoulis

The Medal of the Municipality of Kythera
awarded by Professor George Leontsinis,
Municipal Councillor,
Representative of the Municipality of Kythera

Angelo Notaras received the award for the following services:

Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).


Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera
.

In 2000 Angelo Notaras was a member of the Millennium Heritage Committee of the Greek Orthodox Church and of the Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame. The Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame ensured recognition for Australian athletes of Greek heritage who had represented Australia and had attained prominent positions in Australian sport. The Millennium Heritage Committee formed the Provicare Foundation, a charity established under the auspices of the Greek Orthodox Church to aid disadvantaged persons suffering from alcohol and drug addiction.

Funding for the Provicare Foundation was undertaken on an Australia-wide basis under the direction of Angelo Notaras and Father Steven Scoutas of St Spyridon Church, Kingsford. Angelo Notaras and Father Steven developed a proposal under which Angelo and John manufactured (all at their own cost) moulds to create thousands of hollow plastic batons, fashioned to resemble Greek columns, that were distributed to communities and parishes throughout Australia, to be filled with coin donations. They also coordinated the packaging, transport and delivery of the plastic batons to every single Greek Orthodox parish and community across Australia, as well as monitoring and accounting for the returns after nine months. The initial efforts raised $500,000 and, with subsequent distribution and collection of batons, the final fundraising amount totalled some $700,000. This amount has been used to further the aims of the Provicare Foundation, focusing particularly on the Sydney metropolitan area. The success of these achievements is principally due to the inspiration, financial support and commitment of Angelo Notaras.

Angelo Notaras also participated in further fundraising for the purposes of refurbishing premises provided by the NSW Government at Marine Parade, Brighton-le-Sands; a sum in excess of $100,000 was raised for the Provicare Foundation and the Greek Welfare Centre to provide social services to disadvantaged persons.

As a result of these acts of beneficence, Angelo was awarded the "Cross of St. Andrew", the Greek Orthodox Church's highest award. The medal was presented on 28 November 2003 for “valuable services to the Church and the community”. (A photograph of Angelo Notaras, with wife Mary, taken on the day of presentation, is included with this nomination).
Services to the island of Kythera, Greece, and the Greek-Australian and Kytherian-Australian community.

Kythera is a small island that lies at the tip of the Peloponnese in southern Greece. The large island of Crete is located to the South of Kythera. Since 1854, a majority of the islands’ residents have chosen to migrate to Australia. 3000 Kytherians live on the island. There are 60,000 Kytherians and their descendants’ resident in Australia.

In 2003 James Prineas, a Kytherian-Australian living in Germany, devised the concept of an electronic cultural archive, based on an open access web-site. He proposed that www.kythera-family.net be established, and that instead of being based on the ‘standard’ principle of a ‘central’ web master, monitoring and ordering web content – the kythera-family site should be accessible to all. Kytherians from all around the world were empowered to upload photographs, stories and audio-files, directly onto the site. The concept sounds passé, 10 years ‘down the track’, but at the time, it was revolutionary.

Angelo Notaras recognised immediately that the idea was brilliant. He and John agreed to provide a substantial sum as seed capital to establish the web-site. With his contribution, and his imprimatur, the site became operational very quickly. In the past 10 years the site content has grown to almost 18,000 entries. It is construed as the ‘Encyclopaedia Kytherianika’ in the world, as well as an electronic museum of Kythera. Major encyclopaedias utilise its content. It is used by many universities for educational purposes and has already been the subject of a Master’s and Ph.D thesis. It is the envy of other Greek-Australian, and cultural institutions in Australia, and around the world. (See the original ‘prospectus’ form for the website which accompanies this nomination).
In 2005, Angelo Notaras was instrumental in setting up the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. (A 4-page brochure, summarising the achievements of the KWHF to 2010 is included with this nomination). The main aim of the fund was to preserve the Kytherian heritage for the benefit of Kytherians worldwide.

Kytherian World Heritage Fund

The work of the fund grew out of Angelo Notaras’ initiative, along with brothers John and Mitchell, to personally fund, the publication of former Ambassador to Greece, Hugh Gilchrist’s comprehensive historical research, detailing the relationship between Greeks and Australians. Australians and Greeks, Volume 1 was published in 1992. A large print run of 5000 units was produced.

Angelo Notaras also contributed funds to the second volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 2 published in 1997. And to the third volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 3, published in 2004. The three volumes are the definitive history of the Greek presence in Australia.
Since 1992, under Angelo Notaras’ stewardship, the KWHF has gradually evolved into a minor publishing house, with 22 books on its publication list. Over time the KWHF has either published, or been heavily associated with the best three volumes of the history of the Greeks in Australia, as well as the best individual volumes on Greek Life in Australia in 1916, Greeks in Queensland, Greeks in Australian Cafes, Greeks in Australian cinemas, and the Greeks relationship with the Australian military. Excellent individual biographies and life stories of Greek and Kytherian Australians also form part of the publication list. As does a very good Greek cookbook.

Kytherian history is also well represented. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund have produced a general history of Kythera, and specific histories of Kythera under British occupation, the origins of Kytherian Surnames, the history of the town of Potamos, books of vintage photographs taken on Kythera during the early part of the twentieth century, and the best DVD historical and tourist guide for Kythera, ever produced. All are in print, and available.

In 2012, KWHF plans to print four additional books, including Kytherian Surnames, which traces the derivation of every Kytherian surname, and a photographic book, detailing the island of Kythera from the air.

A book list can be downloaded at
/download/KWHFBookPriceList.pdf

Kytherian Photography & Realia. The plate glass negative collection of Panayotis Fatseas – 1,800 valuable prints – which would have been lost to posterity, without the intervention of Angelo Notaras (Sydney), the Kythera Cultural Association, (Potamos, Kythera), under the Directorship of John Stathatos, and the KWHF. Plate glass negatives photographs taken on Kythera from the 1920’s to 1940’s were deteriorating in a storeroom on the island. Angelo Notaras provided computers, scanners, printers, archiving material, and secure storage containers for this important preservation project. This led to a major exhibition at the prestigious Benaki Museum, Athens, in 2008, and to the publication of Panayotis Fatseas. Faces of Kythera, 1920-1938. (2008).
Angelo Notaras has also been involved with a number of Special Projects on the island of Kythera.

Eye Clinic on Kythera. KWHF provided some input into conceiving the idea. It was actioned by Professor Minas Coroneo, Professor of Ophthalmology, University of NSW. Minas mobilised ophthalmologists and optometrists from Europe and Australia, brought sophisticated equipment to the island, and tested the eye sight of many residents, and treated their eyes, en masse.

Medical Equipment containers to Kythera for distribution to the Hospital (Potamos), and Aged Care Facility, (Potamos). Financial and logistical aid in collecting, packing, and shipping beds, with internal moving parts, and equipment to enhance resident and patient mobility on the island. A 20ft container was sent in 2007, and a 40ft container in 2009. This should provide the residents on the island of Kythera with access to wheel chairs and other aids, for years to come.

Library Shelving for Kythera. Logistical and financial support to despatch library shelving, from Alhambra, Los Angeles, USA, to Kythera. (2009). These shelves will form part of the first lending library to be instigated on the island of Kythera. The projects was instigated and superbly managed by Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, California, USA.

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).

Angelo Notaras joined the Board of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 2005 and has had a profound impact on its activities. He has made a significant contribution in both terms of advice to and mentoring of the younger members of the Board .

Since his appointment to the Board his influence has been widespread and includes the following:
Angelo has encouraged a sharper focus on cultural issues, particularly through www.kythera-family.net and the book publishing arm of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, with the result that the Association now expends far more funds on important cultural activities than it had done hitherto. As a result, many important works - in both the English and Greek language - have been published and made available for the first time.

With his proven business acumen, Angelo has provided wise counsel at the time the Association’s Board evaluated and purchased a building for investment purposes and for the creation of a substantial cultural resource centre and library in Rockdale known as Kythera House.

Angelo advised the Board on how to best achieve the refurbishment of Kythera House in order to provide a high quality cultural centre, which would be attractive to both members and friends of the Association, in order to promote greater use of the facility and the resources amongst members of the Kytherian and wider Greek-Australian community.

He has encouraged the setting up of record and account systems to increase the Association’s membership base.

Angelo has also determinedly pursued the revised and updating of the Association’s Constitution in order to help meet the needs of a 21st century cultural organisation.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Biographies Project on 14.03.2011

Len Notaras, wife wife Robyn, and Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Kevin Rudd

Len Notaras

AM 2003. LL.BA (Hons), BMed, MHA, DipComm (Newcastle), AFCHSE, MA (Military History);

Son of George and Mary-Theresa Notaras, born May 29, 1951, Educated at Marist Brothers, Newcastle. Married to Robyn Cahill.

Executive Director, National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre 2009-current.

General Manager Royal Darwin Hospital 2007-2009; Northern Territory Principal Medical Consultant, Royal Darwin Hospital; Director of Medical Services, Darwin Private Hospital, since 2001; Senior Lecturer, N.T. Clinical School. Newcastle, NSW.

Career: former Deputy Secretary, Service Provision Territory Health Services, General Manager Royal Darwin Hospital 1996-99, Executive Officer Orthopaedic Review, John Hunter Hospital, 1994, Clinical Superintendent 1990-1994, Deputy medical superintendent Royal Newcastle Hospital 1990. Medical registrar, 1988-1989, Manager Enterprise (Retail) 1974-82, Police and Military Service 1968-74; Vice-President, NT AMA , President. NT Br. ACHSE, President Country Liberal Party 2001-2003, Member . NT Road Traffic Council since 1999, Australian Council of Healthcare Standards, Member. Australian Healthcare Assoc, Chair NT Pharmacy Board, NT Radiographers Board, NT Quality and Best Practices Standing Committee, Member. Australian Council for Safety and Quality in Healthcare (ACSQHC), Deputy Chairman, NT Medical Board since 1997, Senior Cr NT British Australian Medical Association, Honorary Member Northern Command Officers Mess; Member NT Cancer Council, Government House Fund; recipient AMA Award for Outstanding Contribution to Bali response, Australian of the Year finalist 2004, Sarah Wheeler History. Award Newcastle 1979;

Publications: The Bali Response: 36 Redefining Hours,
The 1885 Washington Conference on Samoan Affairs.

Recreational activity: shooting, military history, wine collection, military memorabilia. Clubs: Lord Taverners, (NT), Darwin Sailing, Darwin Turf, President, Beefsteak and Burgundy (Darwin):

Entry from Who's Who, Australia

Len Notaras was Royal Darwin Hospital medical superintendent, in 2002, at the time of the Bali bombing. Victims and casulties were airlifted to Darwin, and placed under his medical supervision

Source: The Age
Date: 14 Oct 2002 13 AUSTRALIANS DEAD, 110 INJURED, 220 UNACCOUNTED FOR

At least 13 Australians are dead, 110 injured and 220 remain unaccounted for this morning after suspected terrorist bombs destroyed two crowded nightspots in Bali's Kuta Beach tourist strip at the weekend.
Byline: Malcolm Brown, Darwin, Josh Gordon, Canberra with agencies

"We understand that 13 Australians have died, although those figures are fluid,'' a spokesman for Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said.

One of the first of 15 injured Australians evacuated by the RAAF from Bali died on the flight to Darwin today. By 8am today almost all the injured Australians had been flown from the island back to Australia.

World leaders united in condemning the attacks that have left at least 187 people dead and more than 300 injured, many with horrific burns caused by the blast and resulting inferno.

US ambassador to Indonesia Ralph Boyce said while no one had claimed responsibility for the bombing, early indications pointed to the al Qaeda terror network. He told CNN television: "There have been problems in Indonesia of late involving signs that al Qaeda may have been involved in activities here.''

He said that bombings in Indonesia over the past few weeks indicated the group's presence there.

US President George Bush called the bombings "a cowardly act designed to create terror and chaos'' and offered condolences to the families of the victims.

"The world must confront this global menace, terrorism . . . And, we must call this despicable act by its rightful name, murder.''

Australia's national security committee, including Prime Minister John Howard, Defence Minister Robert Hill and Attorney-General Daryl Williams, will meet later today.

Mr Howard this morning urged Indonesia to become more involved in the international quest to stamp out terrorism following the Bali bombings.

"It does require a willingness on the part of the Indonesian authorities to have people sit with them and work with them in dealing with this problem,'' he told Sydney radio.

"I also speak on behalf of a country who's not only a neighbour but whose sons and daughters have died in this outrage. It's therefore very important that we work together and that all of us in this region understand the urgency of this issue.''

Mr Howard said ASIO and Australian Federal Police members were in Bali to help with the investigation.

Indonesia President Megawati Sukarnoputri wept at the smoking ruins of the Sari Club, before stopping briefly at the 770-bed Sanglah General Hospital, where she donned a surgical mask and visited burn victims.

Mrs Megawati, who went to Bali after an emergency cabinet meeting, said the explosions were a warning that terrorism was a threat to national security but she offered no clues on who authorities believed might be to blame.

Condolences poured in from around the globe, with French President Jacques Chirac denouncing the explosions as "blind terrorism'', while Britain described them as an "appalling terrorist act''.

The US has sent a FBI team and Britain a team of forensic and counter-terrorism specialists to Kuta to help with the investigation.

Republican US senator Richard Shelby said after a briefing from the FBI and CIA yesterday that there was "a definite terrorist link'' to the Bali bombings. "I believe that this is the beginning of a lot more (that) we're going to see,'' Senator Shelby, senior Republican on the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, said.

The first of five C-130 aircraft left Denpasar last night only half full of casualties because some of the victims were too ill to delay take-off until more arrived, a defence spokesman said.

"I can tell you the first 15 victims of the tragedy have arrived and sadly one of those died in transit,'' Royal Darwin Hospital medical superintendent Len Notaras said after the first victims arrived in Darwin.

The first Hercules touched down at at Darwin airport at 2.15am where nine ambulances and an ambulance bus were ready to take them to the Royal Darwin Hospital.

The 11 men and three women were all Australians, coming from states including Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia. Most were young, all were burn victims. Other injuries included fractured limbs, shrapnel wounds and injuries from being impaled by wood and glass. As many as four were in critical conditions.

A second Hercules is expected in Darwin later this morning with 22 on board. Up to 100 victims are expected to arrive at the hospital in about 12 hours, Dr Notaras said.

Future medical evacuations were expected to also include American, Canadian and New Zealand patients.

"The sheer magnitude of what has actually occurred is going to take some considerable time to sink in for a lot of people including ourselves at the hospital,'' Dr Notaras said. ``It has been our own, in a sense, 11th of September; it's a tragedy.''

Scores of Australian tourists arrived back in Perth early today aboard the first of three special flights, from their nightmare Bali holidays. They were met by teams of Australian Federal Police and West Australian police officers who were interviewing all Bali passengers.

The injured were then taken by 12 ambulances to Perth's major hospitals.

The Federal Police's WA general manager, Steve Jackson, indicated passengers would be asked for their holiday photos and videos as investigators helped their Indonesian counterparts with inquiries into the blasts.

Mr Howard said Australia would take a measured response. "It is not an occasion for hot-headed responses, but certainly not an occasion to imagine that if you roll yourself up into a little ball all these horrible things will go away,'' he told Channel Nine. — with agencies

MASSACRE IN BALI

• AUSTRALIA Thirteen confirmed dead, 110 injured, including 60 critical, 220 unaccounted
• BRITAIN Five or six feared dead, at least 40 injured
• HONG KONG Nine missing feared dead
• INDONESIA Nine dead
• SINGAPORE Three reported dead
• GERMANY One dead, eight injured, five badly. Two reportedly missing
• SWITZERLAND One dead, two seriously injured, three slightly injured
• FRANCE One reported dead
• NETHERLANDS One reported dead
• ECUADOR One reported dead
• BELGIUM Six slightly injured
• ITALY Six slightly injured
• JAPAN Seven injured
• USA None reported dead, injured or missing

The wounded also include Swedes, Ecuadorans, South Koreans and South Africans.

SOURCE: REUTERS, AFP

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 21.11.2009

Life in Australia, 2009. How the books were conceived, composited, designed, and printed. 3

Eleni Kamari Aroney. Generous benefactor.

The initial impetus arose out of collecting research material for the web-site www.kythera-family.net. It became very obvious to James Prineas, Angelo Notaras and George C Poulos, Administrators of the website that Life in Australia, (1916), was a seminal and important book in Greek-Australian history.

Angelo Notaras states in his article in the 2009 Epilogue to the book - My Family's...Life in Australia, pp. 312-313, that around 1943, when he was about 10 years old, his father showed him a family copy of the book. From that time he harboured a desire to see the book re-published.

"60 years after first being introduced to Life in Australia, and 93 years after publication, I am now able to enjoy reading this historic, iconic publication in English. It was Life in Asutralia which inspired me later in life to devote my energies to preserving our Kytherian culture and heritage."

George Poulos first encountered the book in 1974, when he was in his early twenties. He, like so many other Greek-Australians, immediately photocopied the book. This photocopied version has been in his possession ever since. He too aspired to see the book reproduced, and translated.

James Prineas, was also a "fan" of the book. He began to place some photographs and biographical excerpts from the book, onto www.kythera-family.net. A determination to re-publish grew, culminating in 2006, with a plan as to how to carry out the Project.

In 2006, Peter Prineas published his superb book, Katsehamos & The Great Idea. Peter had used a small boutique publisher, Breakout Design & Print. Notaras and Poulos, were very impressed with both the art work, and the design quality.

They arranged a meeting with managing director, Brett Collins, and his team, in their then, Balmain Headquarters.

Breakout Design & Printhave since moved to:

Trades Hall,
Suite 204,
4 Goulburn St
Sydney 2000

Phone (02) 9283 0123
Fax (02) 9283 0112

Email, Breakout

http://www.breakout.net.au/

Notaras and Poulos came armed with two original editions of Life in Australia, one of which was john Comino's, grandson of the original benefactor, John D Comino, and the other which had fallen into the possession of George C Poulos, in circumstances that are worth recounting, here.

The book was sent to me by Eleni (Helen) Aroney - her family's paratsoukli, or nickname, is Kamaris, who lives in Gillman, Adelaide, South Australia. It was originally the copy of her grandfather, Nikolaos P Aroney, who lived in Moree. He had signed his name on the inside cover, in a neat ink, on the 25th September, 1916.
Helen had heard through kythera-family that I needed a copy of the book to fulfil my life-time ambition. She sent me a copy through the post. It arrived unnounced. I was deeply moved. I rang her to thank her, and she said, "I don't have any close relatives who understand the book, or will value it. I know you will make best use of it." The subsequent publication of Life in Australia (1916), has proved her instincts correct. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund has made best use of it.

The reason why Notaras and Poulos felt the need to arrive at the initial meeting with Breakout with two books in hand, was that the quality of the pages in a single issue of Life in Australia was very uneven. Some pages were either unusable, or would have taken far too much time and effort to restore digitally. By having two copies, the compositer and graphic designer could pick and choose the best entries from both books. In this way we have arrived at a much better product.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 11.11.2009

Life in Australia, 2009. How the books were conceived, composited, designed, and printed. 2

Brett Collins. Managing Director of Breakout Design & Print.

How the books were conceived, composited, designed, and printed


The initial impetus arose out of collecting research material for the web-site www.kythera-family.net. It became very obvious to James Prineas, Angelo Notaras and George C Poulos, Administrators of the website that Life in Australia, (1916), was a seminal and important book in Greek-Australian history.

Angelo Notaras states in his article in the 2009 Epilogue to the book - My Family's...Life in Australia, pp. 312-313, that around 1943, when he was about 10 years old, his father showed him a family copy of the book. From that time he harboured a desire to see the book re-published.

"60 years after first being introduced to Life in Australia, and 93 years after publication, I am now able to enjoy reading this historic, iconic publication in English. It was Life in Asutralia which inspired me later in life to devote my energies to preserving our Kytherian culture and heritage."

[[picture:"Angelo.tiff" ID:16894]]

George Poulos first encountered the book in 1974, when he was in his early twenties. He, like so many other Greek-Australians, immediately photocopied the book. This photocopied version has been in his possession ever since. He too aspired to see the book reproduced, and translated.

James Prineas, was also a "fan" of the book. He began to place some photographs and biographical excerpts from the book, onto www.kythera-family.net. A determination to re-publish grew, culminating in 2006, with a plan as to how to carry out the Project.

In 2006, Peter Prineas published his superb book, Katsehamos & The Great Idea. Peter had used a small boutique publisher, Breakout Design & Print. Notaras and Poulos, were very impressed with both the art work, and the design quality.

They arranged a meeting with managing director, Brett Collins, and his team, in their then, Balmain Headquarters.

Breakout Design & Printhave since moved to:

Trades Hall,
Suite 204,
4 Goulburn St
Sydney 2000

Phone (02) 9283 0123
Fax (02) 9283 0112

Email, Breakout

http://www.breakout.net.au/

Notaras and Poulos came armed with two original editions of Life in Australia, one of which was john Comino's, grandson of the original benefactor, John D Comino, and the other which had fallen into the possession of George C Poulos, in circumstances that are worth recounting, here.

The book was sent to me by Eleni (Helen) Aroney - her family's paratsoukli, or nickname, is Kamaris, who lives in Gillman, Adelaide, South Australia. It was originally the copy of her grandfather, Nikolaos P Aroney, who lived in Moree. He had signed his name on the inside cover, in a neat ink, on the 25th September, 1916.
Helen had heard through kythera-family that I needed a copy of the book to fulfil my life-time ambition. She sent me a copy through the post. It arrived unnounced. I was deeply moved. I rang her to thank her, and she said, "I don't have any close relatives who understand the book, or will value it. I know you will make best use of it." The subsequent publication of Life in Australia (1916), has proved her instincts correct. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund has made best use of it.

The reason why Notaras and Poulos felt the need to arrive at the initial meeting with Breakout with two books in hand, was that the quality of the pages in a single issue of Life in Australia was very uneven. Some pages were either unusable, or would have taken far too much time and effort to restore digitally. By having two copies, the compositer and graphic designer could pick and choose the best entries from both books. In this way we have arrived at a much better product.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 11.11.2009

Life in Australia, 2009. How the books were conceived, composited, designed, and printed. 1

Angelo Notaras. His involvement with the 2009 publication of Life in Australia

The initial impetus arose out of collecting research material for the web-site www.kythera-family.net. It became very obvious to James Prineas, Angelo Notaras and George C Poulos, Administrators of the website that Life in Australia, (1916), was a seminal and important book in Greek-Australian history.

Angelo Notaras states in his article in the 2009 Epilogue to the book - My Family's...Life in Australia, pp. 312-313, that around 1943, when he was about 10 years old, his father showed him a family copy of the book. From that time he harboured a desire to see the book re-published.

"60 years after first being introduced to Life in Australia, and 93 years after publication, I am now able to enjoy reading this historic, iconic publication in English. It was Life in Australia which inspired me later in life to devote my energies to preserving our Kytherian culture and heritage."

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by John Carras on 23.04.2007

Angelo Notaras presents the Governor of Queensland Ms Quentin Bryce, AC, with all three volumes of the great Hugh Gilchrist's book, Australians & Greeks..

....one of the highlights of the big Brisbane panayiri...

This happened at that greatest of Kytherian-Brisbane events which was held on Sunday the 15th April, 2007, from 11:30 - 5:00pm.

The venue was the Cyprus Club, also known as the
West End Club,
2 Vulture Street,
West End 4101
(07) 3844 7965
Fax(07) 3844 7757

westendc@bigpond.net.au

The event was held for 3 reasons:
1. to mark the official Queensland launch of www.kythera-family.net
2. to mark the official Queensland launch of Katsehamos and the Great Idea
3. to forge a new and inviolable union between the Kytherian Association of Queensland Inc, and the Kytherian Association of Australia, (ostensibly the Kytherian Association of NSW).

The occasion became known as the Brisbane panayiri and mega-event.

Ultimately, demand for seats was so high, that the event had to be moved from Kapsali Restaurant to the Cyprus Club.

Attendance was c. 500

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 06.05.2005

Peter Frilingos.

His life and death was a telling story

By PAUL KENT


Daily Telegraph May 3, 2005, page 17.

Today marks the first anniversary of the passing of a much-loved journalist at The Daily Telegraph, Peter Frilingos. PAUL KENT recalls the wit and wisdom of a friend and colleague who always told a good story:


NOT long after Peter Frilingos died last year Penrith coach, John Lang was on the phone and the conversation turned around to his passing.

Lang said he always liked him, liked what he stood for.


"He didn't always quote exactly what you said," Lang said.


"But he always quoted what you meant to say."


Part of the fun that has been missing around this office the past year – since Chippy passed away a year ago today – is the art of telling the story.


The fun part being the off-the-record variety.


Those were the ones that ran unrestricted by the demands of a newspaper and always told of some atrocity or another.


He found stories you never dreamt of hearing.


A club chairman three years back was walking around the football with a walking stick, telling everybody that he tripped and fell at home.


For this he gained much sympathy. Truth was, he was leaving the basketball and snuck off behind a car in the car park to relieve himself when a woman came around the corner with her two kids and bumped straight into him.


The kids started screaming, the club boss panicked and turned to run and smashed his leg on the bull-bar of the car he was hiding behind.


Imagining the look on the chairman's face was what got to Chippy the most.


Those were the best stories, the off-the-record stories.


He had a deep catalogue.


Shortly before his death Chippy was telling a story about a workmate in this office who'd had a car accident. As usual, he was building up the laughs.


He told the story and the workmate was protesting throughout, challenging the details, and his frustration was only fuelling the fire.


Chippy silenced him, telling how 20 years ago this guy wrapped himself around a telegraph pole and how he had argued with the police when they came to cut him out of the wreck, trying to talk his way out of a ticket.


"That's wrong," the workmate plaintively insisted.


Chippy held up a hand: "Please."


When the punchline arrived and the laughs subsided the workmate finally chipped in.


"Chippy that's wrong," he said.


"I didn't argue with the coppers because I was unconscious at the time they cut me out."


Chippy thought about it briefly.


"You might be right," he said.


Now, as we know, the stories have fallen silent, as we pass a year since the death of a man whose life was stories, both finding them and writing them, and in his spare time telling them.


That's the part not a lot of people saw, but they were generally the best part. The Chippy stories that couldn't be printed.


He left us regarded as the greatest rugby league journalist this town has known, passing away at his desk.


As we all know, he was on the phone to NRL boss David Gallop, chasing a story, when he suffered a heart attack that was too big even for him to handle.


He was 59 and life had been no different for the past 40 years as he chased and chased, breaking some of the biggest stories in the greatest game of all's history.


His superior talent, though, at least for one observer, was not so much the breaking of the big story as the ability to be on the pulse with that day's news.


He led the day's news more often than any man ever has. Even as he looked to do it again there was no indication that he was suffering any sort of heart problems.


He had taped an episode of The Back Page on Fox Sports and returned to work and was sitting at his desk when I turned to wind him up about something.


That's what we often did with him. Pulled the pin from the grenade and rolled it gently his way, letting him detonate.


This day he just shrugged his shoulders and said "yeah" and turned to pick up the phone.


No doubt he was feeling ill. Nobody knew how serious.


Last year 50,292 people died from heart disease – that's a death every 10 minutes.


More than 30,000 of them had not reached the average Australian life expectancy age, and all of them went too soon.


Those numbers are significant because heart disease is generally considered an older person's disease, something to begin to worry about when the retirement home comes into sight.


However already around Australia 3.2 million people live with cardiovascular disease.


This represents a frightening figure of one in every six Australians. If nothing changes it will grow to be one in every four by the middle of the century.


To combat this, The Heart Foundation has launched an appeal in Chippy's honour for National Heart Week.


Coupons are being printed in The Daily Telegraph all week.


This weekend, Ray Hadley's Continuous Call team will help raise much-needed funds for the Peter Frilingos Appeal.


The usual band of misfits will be on radio, making the best of the hole they are left with.


Hopefully one of them will tell an atrocity story for old time's sake.


There is a stockpile waiting.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 06.05.2005

Peter Frilingos Tribute

Chippy's humour, honesty and spirit will never die

BY DEAN RITCHIE


Daily Telegraph, May 3, 2005, page 61.

IF only he was still around today. Rugby league – the game Peter Frilingos spoke about with pride – is at an all-time high at the moment.


A season Chippy would have passionately absorbed, enjoyed and analysed. Sadly, though, Chippy is not here today.

It was one year ago this afternoon he was taken from us by a heart attack.


But for those here at The Daily Telegraph, Chippy's legacy, humour, honesty and spirit will never die.


He was never short of a comment. Never short of an opinion.


Those opinions would have been aired time and again this season from the Newcastle drama, to Mundine, to Hopoate, to video referees.


It's almost as if we can hear what he would say . . .


Anthony Mundine: "He's not the sharpest tool in the shed."


John Hopoate: "In the fair dinkum department, he's a repeat offender."


The soccer riots in Sydney's west: "That's Fort Apache territory [anywhere west of the CBD]."


The Newcastle Knights-Bathurst scandal: "That'll do me [as he throws his hands up in the air]."


NRL's fine for Newcastle: "It came over like a bolo punch."


Lightweight Brett Finch involving himself in a brawl last week: "If they get a hold of him all that will be left is an eyebrow and the tongue out of his shoe."


Unknown Broncos rookie Leon Bott: "Where's he from? Reykjavik, Iceland?"


The 16-year-old suspended for 30 years: "He's an Olympic-class dill."


Hopoate again: "He's an imbecile [pronounced im-b-ceel]. Pull over and give yourself an upper-cut."


Princess Mary's past year: "She's been around the world more times than Yuri Gagarin."


Newcastle's Dane Tilse, the villain in Bathurst: "Isn't he a gibberer [followed by vibrating his lips with a finger]."


Video referee: "It's not rocket science"


A prediction: "Trust me, [as he gives a slow right wink], I know."


English referee Russell Smith: "What, is he speaking Swahili [or Lithuanian]."

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 06.05.2005

Peter Frilingos. Mimosimo. 1 year after his death.

Peter "Chippy" Frilingos Appeal

Monday 2 May 2005

Pictured: Left to Right:
Alison, Matthew, Anna, Maureen and Peter Frilingos


The Heart Foundation in conjunction with Radio 2GB and The Daily Telegraph are conducting an appeal during Heart Week in commemoration of Peter Frilingos.

Peter [Chippy] was one of Australia’s most respected sports journalists who died suddenly of a heart attack on 3rd May, 2004.

Funds raised in honour of Peter Frilingos will benefit a prestigious Heart Foundation Research Award in his name.

The Heart Foundation supports the highest quality cardiovascular research, providing major advances in knowledge that will lead to improved cardiovascular health and better prevention and management of cardiovascular health.

For over forty years the Heart Foundation has played a vital role in funding research into the causes, prevention, treatment and diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and related disorders.

Research supported by the Heart Foundation has made a significant contribution to the generation and application of new knowledge for the benefit of the Australian community. However, there is still much to be achieved as cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in Australia.

Donations can be made by calling 1800 179 114 or by sending your donation to:

The Peter Frilingos Appeal
National Heart Foundation Australia
GPO Box 9966 in your Capital City

http://www.heartfoundation.com.au/index.cfm?page=331