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submitted by George Poulos on 08.12.2006

Olive trees planted by Yarni Logothetis, Logothetyianika, Kythera.

In another entry about the Monterey Cafe in Gilgandra, I revealed that "...I was born in Gilgandra, in 1952, and left after completing my schooling in 1969.

The Kytherian presence in Gilgandra began in 1910, with the Baveas family establishing the ABC Cafe in the town.

A comprehensive history of the Kytherian presence in Gilgandra

From about the end of WWII, until mid-1975 - Gilgandra, population, 2,900 - became a very Kytherian town.

5 families - the Pentes, Sklavos, Kelly (Yiannakellis), Psaltis (Protopsaltis), and Poulos (Tzortzopoulos) - lived in close proximity to each other - culturally, residentially, and commercially.

In the main, Kytherians embraced Kytherians - Gilgandra embraced Kytherians - and Kytherians embraced Gilgandra".

During the middle of the year 2004, I took my father, now 88 years old, on a nostalgia tour, back to Gilgandra, and through other towns in the Central and North West of New South Wales.

Not a single person of Kytherian origin now lives in Gilgandra.

I found of course, all the buildings, where the Kytherians had conducted their businesses; but all of these - with the exception of the Gilgandra Fruit Shop (my father's old shop), had substantially changed their usage.

I also found a series of what I came to call living memorials to the Kytherians who had lived, worked, and died in the town.

These were the olive trees that almost invariably every Kytherian family planted.

Elsewhere I have also spoken about the olive-ization of Australia. This is part of that same phenomenon.

Olive-ization. Hot off the press

Olive-ization of Australia. Swan Valley, Western Australia

Jack Pentes, who ran a store on the intersection of the main street, opposite the Royal Hotel, and lived one street further back, had planted a number of olive trees.

I have outlined the history of Jack's trees in another submission.

Olive trees. Living Memorials to Jack Pentes

The trees on the footpath outside this house in Morris Street, Gilgandra, were planted by Yarni Logothetis, from Logothetyianika, Kythera.

His son, Harry, and daughter-in-law Voula, had purchased the Gilgandra Fruit Shop from their "buzunaki" and brother-in-law Con George Poulos in the early 1970's.

For a few years he came to Australia, and lived in the house with the Logus family.

In a sense you could say that the 2 olive trees are a living memorial to Yarni Logothetis.

But the Kytherian presence in the house depicted in this photograph runs much longer and much deeper than this,

For more that 2 decades the Sklavos family, headed by Peter and Theothora, lived in the house. They left in 1968, moving to the Gold Coast, Queensland.

The house was then occupied, (to the best of my memory) by the Aird-Kelly (daughter of Paul and Chris Kelly, of ABC Cafe fame) family, for a few years, before being sold to the Logus family.

The olive trees then, become not only a living memorial to Yarni Logothetis, but also to the Sklavos, Aird-Kelly, and Logus families as well.

To conclude in the same vein as the submission on Jack Pentes -

...in these olive trees, which could live for thousands of years, we have a living memorial to Yarni Logothetis, the Sklavos, Aird-Kelly, and Logus family - and their "Kytherian presence" - in the town of Gilgandra, NSW

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by George Poulos on 15.09.2005

English school, for Greek kids. 1957.

One of my favourite images from the National Archives, Canberra.

"Immigration - Migrant education (learning English) - Twelve year old Stanley Harris, an Adelaide schoolboy spends most of his spare time teaching Greek migrants English. He now teaches a class of 10 children but he has taught a class of 20. He recently helped two adult Greeks to win their English certificates after 34 lessons. When Stanley finishes his own lessons at school he hurries home to prepare his own 'four o'clock' school".

http://www.naa.gov.au/

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 28.08.2005

Karavitiko Symposium. 1970's.

Left hand side,

Top to bottom:

Beryl Cassimatis (nee, Palmer)
Angie (Tzortzo)Poulos (nee, Coroneos)
Helen Zantes (nee, Levantis)
Aryiro (Tzortzo)Poulos, (nee, Aloizios).

Left hand side:

Con Dimitri (Tzortzo)Poulos
Janice Tzortzo)Poulos, (nee, Garner)
George Anastassios Levantis
Harry Dimitri (Tzortzo)Poulos, (obscured).

Standing, right:

James Con (Tzortzo)Poulos

During this era, Karavitika were very well attended, attracting more than 300 people.

Karavitiko history

The first Karavitoko Symposium was instigated in 1967. It has been conducted every year since. The Symposium was designed to perpetuate the enormous panayiri that was held annually in Karavas to celebrate the name day of the patron saint of the village - Ayios Haralambos.

For an extensive background history of the Karavitiko Symposium see:
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=97-26&cid=14&did=5968&pageflip=1

A formal luncheon or dinner is organised for the first Sunday after Ayios Haralambos's feast day. The Symposium organisers lay claim to the fact that "..we are the only Kytherian village group anywhere in the world who have managed to maintain this tradition in this formal manner". Are there other village groups in the world who also formally celebrate the feast day of their patron saint in this way?

Initially profits from the function were sent back to Karavas to keep the Church of Ayios Haralambos in good order.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 27.04.2006

Karavitiko Symposium. 1970's.

Left to right.

Con George (Tzortzo)Poulos
Nick Pittas (Goulburn)
Mrs Faros
Lucky (Tzortzo)Poulos (Holding arm up. Prominent Sydney businessman, great benefactor, and stalwart of, the Karavitiko.)
Mr Faros (kneeling. Later to return to Kythera to live.)
George Anastassios Levantis. (Exuberant Karavati and Kytherian. Initially proprietor of a Fruit and Vegetable business in Goulburn, later purchased the Newtown Hot Bread shop, located above the railway station in Newtown, from Lucky Poulos.)

During this era, Karavitika were very well attended, attracting more than 300 people.

Karavitiko history

The first Karavitoko Symposium was instigated in 1967. It has been conducted every year since. The Symposium was designed to perpetuate the enormous panayiri that was held annually in Karavas to celebrate the name day of the patron saint of the village - Ayios Haralambos.

For an extensive background history of the Karavitiko Symposium see:
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=97-26&cid=14&did=5968&pageflip=1

A formal luncheon or dinner is organised for the first Sunday after Ayios Haralambos's feast day. The Symposium organisers lay claim to the fact that "..we are the only Kytherian village group anywhere in the world who have managed to maintain this tradition in this formal manner". Are there other village groups in the world who also formally celebrate the feast day of their patron saint in this way?

Initially profits from the function were sent back to Karavas to keep the Church of Ayios Haralambos in good order.


***Winner of the GND 2006 Coroneos ("Melasafaos") Prize, for Best Photograph of Person/Group Portraits - of people from Karavas.***

The winner is, the Karavitiko Symposium for this photograph, which includes many stalwarts from Karavas.

The Committee thanks the Symposium for its ongoing support and contributions to the web-site***

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by John Tzannes on 21.05.2005

Armidale NSW - Greek Communities

Armidale NSW was one of many regional cities and country towns fortunate to have a thriving and socially active Greek community. This photo was taken around 1959 at Nick's Cafe, one of many gatherings organised by the local community where families spanning three generations attended. Family names such as Tzannes, Calligeros, Lourandos, Psaltis, Comino, Coolentianos, Anest, Ferros, Pavlo, Cassimatis bring back fond memories. Armidale was blessed with a very large population of Kytherians. My childhood in Armidale is one that I will always cherish (I am the little boy under the photo of the Queen, sticking his head out from behind Tony Calligeros holding his son Angelo.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Georgia Cassimatis on 18.07.2006

George Miller & Michael Jonson. Good Mates.

George Miller and Michael Jonson. At George's twin brother's wedding in 1970.


Two Of Us – George Miller and Michael Johnson


Interviews by: Georgia Cassimatis

Director, Dr George Miller, 59 and best friend, pharmacist Michael Jonson, have known each other since they were 12 years old. With Michael funding George’s first film, Mad Max, they talk about the closeness of their enduring friendship over the past 45 years.

GEORGE:

Micky was the first person I met on my first day at Sydney Boys High School. At the gate there was a hazing ritual; new boys had the tags ripped off their ties the moment they stepped into the school ground. I grew up in rural Queensland so I was a bit green. Micky, this little kid, came out of nowhere and ran me through the gauntlet. The big boys didn’t lay a hand on us and we never lost our tie tags. We became best friends and have remained such for 45years.

We were never in the same class, or clique, but we did coach rowing together. He coxed the senior eight, and I was struck by his effortless authority; here were the cool guys, a lot older and towering over him, doing anything for him.

When he was fourteen he lost his father, so he took on adult responsibility young. He made it through university and started out in business young. That’s not to say he didn’t like to party, and his family home was always a magnet; on any given afternoon at the Johnson’s there’d be up to a dozen people, playing cards, raiding the fridge and, above all, playing cricket and touch football in the back yard.

Micky has always been a very active sportsman; he played rugby for South Australia and touch football for Australia. Then there’s his thing with racehorses. Basically he’s your classic Australian sports tragic; he’ll cross the globe to watch a horse run, or see a cricket or rugby test.

His big love, however, is women. Since we left school he’d call every few weeks to tell me about a fantastic new person he’d met. He’s always jumping in at the deep end, giving all of himself. It’s happened many times and what is amazing to me is that he retains warm friendships with almost all of them. They all fell in love with him for the same reason I did. He has the biggest heart in the world.

Micky is one of those rare souls who gives a whole lot more than he expects to get back. The paradox is of course, that it comes back to him in spades.

Way back, when we went out to raise money for my first movie, Mad Max, everyone thought I was a bit weird. "What’s George doing trying to make movies? What makes him think he can pull off a feature film with no real experience?” Micky never had a second of doubt. He was the first investor and with nothing but dumb faith in me, he brought in others. Without Micky there would have been no Mad Max or the successes that followed and, some would argue, no kick-starts to the careers of Mel and Nicole and so forth.

Of all the people I’ve known the one of whom he reminds me most is Jack Nicholson (Miller directed Nicholson in Witches of Eastwick). They’re both ridiculously loyal to their friends, always falling for beautiful women and both enjoy the deepest affection of anyone who has had the good fortune to encounter them in life.

Over the last couple of years Micky’s had this Herculean battle with cancer and this has somehow amplified all his virtues and wisdoms. When he called to tell me his diagnosis I was shaken, but then he did something that still boggles me; he said the main reason he was calling was to ask a favour for a friend…could I talk to their kid who was desperate to break into the movie business. Typical Micky. He never lacks courage in anything. Eros, Agape and now facing Thanatos. He’s an ornament to the game.

MICHAEL:

My father moved out from Cyprus in 1924 to start a family here. We had a really wonderful childhood: our family was always very close and there was lots of love and warmth. Even though we were Greek ozzies, our Greek heritage was always instilled in us, so we were always going to events like The Young Matrons societies: which were formed by Greek mothers who’d have parties for all the Greek kids so they could get together and maintain their heritage.

I first met George and his twin brother John, at Sydney Boys High School. They were new to town and, being Greek, we’d heard about them. I instantly liked George because of his soft, warm, gentle nature. He’s a considerate, caring guy, which is my type of person.

I remember George used to help his father in their chocolate shop, and I always thought his father was a little hard on him, probably because they had four kids and were doing it tough themselves. So when he didn’t have any money to go to the movies, I’d give him two shillings, and we’d hang out and buy popcorn at half time. He said he’s never forgotten it.

We used to get up to a lot of mischief, a lot of which I can’t mention. But there was one time I remember vividly. Being from the Eastern suburbs, we’d heard stories from my older brother and his mates, about these debaucherous North Shore surfie parties. The year George and I were finally allowed to go, we were so excited and our imaginations ran wild with thoughts of hot girls and lots of orgies. But all that happened was a bunch of guys ran around the house naked with lit newspapers in their butts, called ‘rooster tails’. And the older boys were trying really hard to crack onto all the chicks. We both just sat on the couch like little schoolboys.

George was never a typical Greek boy: he did his own thing and was more off-beat and eccentric. He’d do things like wear a Hawaiian shirt to a Greek dance, when everyone else would be wearing ties. Because of this I wasn’t allowed to have him as my best man; I had to have someone conservative. But when I got married the second time, no one was going to railroad me.

He was also popular with all the girls and had lots of girlfriends. The first time he really fell in love he wrote me a five-page letter about it, which I have framed on my wall here at home.

Even though he has gone on to become successful in the entertainment business, he’s actually quite shy and avoids the limelight if he can. One time at university he asked me to go up and accept an award for him, which I thought was silly and said no, but he got his twin brother to. He’s not into big awards nights either: at the Oscars for Babe, he took his niece just so she could experience it.

When George found out I had cancer he wanted to hop on the first plane from Los Angeles and come back, but I knew he was doing a big business deal and told him it could wait a week.

I haven’t felt crash hot of late, but I did have a wonderful, life-changing experience at the Ian Gawler Foundation in Victoria, which is a retreat for cancer patients, and I’ve asked George if he could help me expand the retreat so it’s Australia-wide. He said he’d be more than willing to be the benefactor and do anything he could.

We both spend a lot of time these days hanging out up at his weekender in Whale Beach. At the end of the day I couldn’t have asked for a better friend who has gone through all my relationships, career, kids and marriages than George. In that respect I feel I’ve had a charmed and blessed life. We both do.


This article, was published in the Good Weekend Magazine, which forms part of the Sydney-Morning-Herald, Sydney - on April 30th, 2005, page 18.

Georgia Cassimatis is the author the article.

A brief profile of her life and career, appears below. It can also be viewed - with photograph - at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Working Life.

Georgia Cassimatis

Georgia Cassimatis began her career as a writer on Australian Cosmopolitan magazine in 1996. After a two year stint, she freelanced for various magazines before being appointed the Editor for teen magazine Barbie. During her time there she met an American man and moved to Los Angeles, which saw her world open up in ways she'd never imagined: she has since worked as a Los Angeles based writer, reporting for lucrative US titles Glamour, Cosmopolitan, Teen and Marie Claire magazines, as well as have her work syndicated internationally.

Born in Australia, Georgia is of Greek decent: her paternal grandfather, John Cassimatis, was born in 1902 in Kythera in the town of Potamos, where his Father was a priest known as Papa Nikolaki. His Mother was Ekaterini Levouni, also of Potamos. He was the 11th of 12 children. Of the nine surviving children, four went to live in Athens and five came to live in Australia, where they had cafes along the Murray River towns. Her grandfather worked in Swan Hill until 1936.

Georgia's paternal grandmother was Georgia Koroneos born in 1917. The second of six children, her father was Panagiotis Koroneos (Poulakis) from Karava and Ayia Pelayia. He was also the President of the Kytherian Society in Athens in the 1930's. Two of his sons went to the USA, and one the aeronautical Engineer returned to live out his life in Agia Pelagia, and the other, became a senator in the Greek parliament.

Panagiotis Koroneos built the wharf at Ayia Pelayia and came to Australia in the late 1950s to find fund raising for the wharf, which lead his travels to many NSW and Queensland towns visiting Kytherians. There is a plaque commemorating his achievement on the wharf.

Georgia Koroneos' mother was Hrisanthi Koroneos who was brought up in the town of Baltimore in the USA where Panagiotis married her, had three kids and returned to Greece.

Georgia's own father, Nicholas Cassimatis, was born in Australia and is a well-known Sydney psychiatrist. Her mother is Anglo Australian with some German blood and loves the Greeks and Kytherian family. Actually her anglo maternal grandfather came to Australia later than her Kytherian forebearers. And Georgia looks Kytherian.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Georgia Cassimatis on 18.07.2006

George Miller and Micheal Jonson. Good Mates.

George Miller and Michael Jonson. A recent (2005) photograph.


Two Of Us – George Miller and Michael Johnson


From, Good Weekend, a supplement in the Sydney Morning Herald, April 30, 2005, page 18.

Interviews by: Georgia Cassimatis

Director, Dr George Miller, 59 and best friend, pharmacist Michael Jonson, have known each other since they were 12 years old. With Michael funding George’s first film, Mad Max, they talk about the closeness of their enduring friendship over the past 45 years.

GEORGE:

Micky was the first person I met on my first day at Sydney Boys High School. At the gate there was a hazing ritual; new boys had the tags ripped off their ties the moment they stepped into the school ground. I grew up in rural Queensland so I was a bit green. Micky, this little kid, came out of nowhere and ran me through the gauntlet. The big boys didn’t lay a hand on us and we never lost our tie tags. We became best friends and have remained such for 45years.

We were never in the same class, or clique, but we did coach rowing together. He coxed the senior eight, and I was struck by his effortless authority; here were the cool guys, a lot older and towering over him, doing anything for him.

When he was fourteen he lost his father, so he took on adult responsibility young. He made it through university and started out in business young. That’s not to say he didn’t like to party, and his family home was always a magnet; on any given afternoon at the Johnson’s there’d be up to a dozen people, playing cards, raiding the fridge and, above all, playing cricket and touch football in the back yard.

Micky has always been a very active sportsman; he played rugby for South Australia and touch football for Australia. Then there’s his thing with racehorses. Basically he’s your classic Australian sports tragic; he’ll cross the globe to watch a horse run, or see a cricket or rugby test.

His big love, however, is women. Since we left school he’d call every few weeks to tell me about a fantastic new person he’d met. He’s always jumping in at the deep end, giving all of himself. It’s happened many times and what is amazing to me is that he retains warm friendships with almost all of them. They all fell in love with him for the same reason I did. He has the biggest heart in the world.

Micky is one of those rare souls who gives a whole lot more than he expects to get back. The paradox is of course, that it comes back to him in spades.

Way back, when we went out to raise money for my first movie, Mad Max, everyone thought I was a bit weird. "What’s George doing trying to make movies? What makes him think he can pull off a feature film with no real experience?” Micky never had a second of doubt. He was the first investor and with nothing but dumb faith in me, he brought in others. Without Micky there would have been no Mad Max or the successes that followed and, some would argue, no kick-starts to the careers of Mel and Nicole and so forth.

Of all the people I’ve known the one of whom he reminds me most is Jack Nicholson (Miller directed Nicholson in Witches of Eastwick). They’re both ridiculously loyal to their friends, always falling for beautiful women and both enjoy the deepest affection of anyone who has had the good fortune to encounter them in life.

Over the last couple of years Micky’s had this Herculean battle with cancer and this has somehow amplified all his virtues and wisdoms. When he called to tell me his diagnosis I was shaken, but then he did something that still boggles me; he said the main reason he was calling was to ask a favour for a friend…could I talk to their kid who was desperate to break into the movie business. Typical Micky. He never lacks courage in anything. Eros, Agape and now facing Thanatos. He’s an ornament to the game.

MICHAEL:

My father moved out from Cyprus in 1924 to start a family here. We had a really wonderful childhood: our family was always very close and there was lots of love and warmth. Even though we were Greek ozzies, our Greek heritage was always instilled in us, so we were always going to events like The Young Matrons societies: which were formed by Greek mothers who’d have parties for all the Greek kids so they could get together and maintain their heritage.

I first met George and his twin brother John, at Sydney Boys High School. They were new to town and, being Greek, we’d heard about them. I instantly liked George because of his soft, warm, gentle nature. He’s a considerate, caring guy, which is my type of person.

I remember George used to help his father in their chocolate shop, and I always thought his father was a little hard on him, probably because they had four kids and were doing it tough themselves. So when he didn’t have any money to go to the movies, I’d give him two shillings, and we’d hang out and buy popcorn at half time. He said he’s never forgotten it.

We used to get up to a lot of mischief, a lot of which I can’t mention. But there was one time I remember vividly. Being from the Eastern suburbs, we’d heard stories from my older brother and his mates, about these debaucherous North Shore surfie parties. The year George and I were finally allowed to go, we were so excited and our imaginations ran wild with thoughts of hot girls and lots of orgies. But all that happened was a bunch of guys ran around the house naked with lit newspapers in their butts, called ‘rooster tails’. And the older boys were trying really hard to crack onto all the chicks. We both just sat on the couch like little schoolboys.

George was never a typical Greek boy: he did his own thing and was more off-beat and eccentric. He’d do things like wear a Hawaiian shirt to a Greek dance, when everyone else would be wearing ties. Because of this I wasn’t allowed to have him as my best man; I had to have someone conservative. But when I got married the second time, no one was going to railroad me.

He was also popular with all the girls and had lots of girlfriends. The first time he really fell in love he wrote me a five-page letter about it, which I have framed on my wall here at home.

Even though he has gone on to become successful in the entertainment business, he’s actually quite shy and avoids the limelight if he can. One time at university he asked me to go up and accept an award for him, which I thought was silly and said no, but he got his twin brother to. He’s not into big awards nights either: at the Oscars for Babe, he took his niece just so she could experience it.

When George found out I had cancer he wanted to hop on the first plane from Los Angeles and come back, but I knew he was doing a big business deal and told him it could wait a week.

I haven’t felt crash hot of late, but I did have a wonderful, life-changing experience at the Ian Gawler Foundation in Victoria, which is a retreat for cancer patients, and I’ve asked George if he could help me expand the retreat so it’s Australia-wide. He said he’d be more than willing to be the benefactor and do anything he could.

We both spend a lot of time these days hanging out up at his weekender in Whale Beach. At the end of the day I couldn’t have asked for a better friend who has gone through all my relationships, career, kids and marriages than George. In that respect I feel I’ve had a charmed and blessed life. We both do.

Comprehensive Biography. George Miller

This article, was published in the Good Weekend Magazine, which forms part of the Sydney-Morning-Herald, Sydney - on April 30th, 2005, page 18.

Georgia Cassimatis is the author the article.

A brief profile of her life and career, appears below. It can also be viewed - with photograph - at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Working Life.

Georgia Cassimatis

Georgia Cassimatis began her career as a writer on Australian Cosmopolitan magazine in 1996. After a two year stint, she freelanced for various magazines before being appointed the Editor for teen magazine Barbie. During her time there she met an American man and moved to Los Angeles, which saw her world open up in ways she'd never imagined: she has since worked as a Los Angeles based writer, reporting for lucrative US titles Glamour, Cosmopolitan, Teen and Marie Claire magazines, as well as have her work syndicated internationally.

Born in Australia, Georgia is of Greek decent: her paternal grandfather, John Cassimatis, was born in 1902 in Kythera in the town of Potamos, where his Father was a priest known as Papa Nikolaki. His Mother was Ekaterini Levouni, also of Potamos. He was the 11th of 12 children. Of the nine surviving children, four went to live in Athens and five came to live in Australia, where they had cafes along the Murray River towns. Her grandfather worked in Swan Hill until 1936.

Georgia's paternal grandmother was Georgia Koroneos born in 1917. The second of six children, her father was Panagiotis Koroneos (Poulakis) from Karava and Ayia Pelayia. He was also the President of the Kytherian Society in Athens in the 1930's. Two of his sons went to the USA, and one the aeronautical Engineer returned to live out his life in Agia Pelagia, and the other, became a senator in the Greek parliament.

Panagiotis Koroneos built the wharf at Ayia Pelayia and came to Australia in the late 1950s to find fund raising for the wharf, which lead his travels to many NSW and Queensland towns visiting Kytherians. There is a plaque commemorating his achievement on the wharf.

Georgia Koroneos' mother was Hrisanthi Koroneos who was brought up in the town of Baltimore in the USA where Panagiotis married her, had three kids and returned to Greece.

Georgia's own father, Nicholas Cassimatis, was born in Australia and is a well-known Sydney psychiatrist. Her mother is Anglo Australian with some German blood and loves the Greeks and Kytherian family. Actually her anglo maternal grandfather came to Australia later than her Kytherian forebearers. And Georgia looks Kytherian.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 06.05.2005

Peter Frilingos.

His life and death was a telling story

By PAUL KENT


Daily Telegraph May 3, 2005, page 17.

Today marks the first anniversary of the passing of a much-loved journalist at The Daily Telegraph, Peter Frilingos. PAUL KENT recalls the wit and wisdom of a friend and colleague who always told a good story:


NOT long after Peter Frilingos died last year Penrith coach, John Lang was on the phone and the conversation turned around to his passing.

Lang said he always liked him, liked what he stood for.


"He didn't always quote exactly what you said," Lang said.


"But he always quoted what you meant to say."


Part of the fun that has been missing around this office the past year – since Chippy passed away a year ago today – is the art of telling the story.


The fun part being the off-the-record variety.


Those were the ones that ran unrestricted by the demands of a newspaper and always told of some atrocity or another.


He found stories you never dreamt of hearing.


A club chairman three years back was walking around the football with a walking stick, telling everybody that he tripped and fell at home.


For this he gained much sympathy. Truth was, he was leaving the basketball and snuck off behind a car in the car park to relieve himself when a woman came around the corner with her two kids and bumped straight into him.


The kids started screaming, the club boss panicked and turned to run and smashed his leg on the bull-bar of the car he was hiding behind.


Imagining the look on the chairman's face was what got to Chippy the most.


Those were the best stories, the off-the-record stories.


He had a deep catalogue.


Shortly before his death Chippy was telling a story about a workmate in this office who'd had a car accident. As usual, he was building up the laughs.


He told the story and the workmate was protesting throughout, challenging the details, and his frustration was only fuelling the fire.


Chippy silenced him, telling how 20 years ago this guy wrapped himself around a telegraph pole and how he had argued with the police when they came to cut him out of the wreck, trying to talk his way out of a ticket.


"That's wrong," the workmate plaintively insisted.


Chippy held up a hand: "Please."


When the punchline arrived and the laughs subsided the workmate finally chipped in.


"Chippy that's wrong," he said.


"I didn't argue with the coppers because I was unconscious at the time they cut me out."


Chippy thought about it briefly.


"You might be right," he said.


Now, as we know, the stories have fallen silent, as we pass a year since the death of a man whose life was stories, both finding them and writing them, and in his spare time telling them.


That's the part not a lot of people saw, but they were generally the best part. The Chippy stories that couldn't be printed.


He left us regarded as the greatest rugby league journalist this town has known, passing away at his desk.


As we all know, he was on the phone to NRL boss David Gallop, chasing a story, when he suffered a heart attack that was too big even for him to handle.


He was 59 and life had been no different for the past 40 years as he chased and chased, breaking some of the biggest stories in the greatest game of all's history.


His superior talent, though, at least for one observer, was not so much the breaking of the big story as the ability to be on the pulse with that day's news.


He led the day's news more often than any man ever has. Even as he looked to do it again there was no indication that he was suffering any sort of heart problems.


He had taped an episode of The Back Page on Fox Sports and returned to work and was sitting at his desk when I turned to wind him up about something.


That's what we often did with him. Pulled the pin from the grenade and rolled it gently his way, letting him detonate.


This day he just shrugged his shoulders and said "yeah" and turned to pick up the phone.


No doubt he was feeling ill. Nobody knew how serious.


Last year 50,292 people died from heart disease – that's a death every 10 minutes.


More than 30,000 of them had not reached the average Australian life expectancy age, and all of them went too soon.


Those numbers are significant because heart disease is generally considered an older person's disease, something to begin to worry about when the retirement home comes into sight.


However already around Australia 3.2 million people live with cardiovascular disease.


This represents a frightening figure of one in every six Australians. If nothing changes it will grow to be one in every four by the middle of the century.


To combat this, The Heart Foundation has launched an appeal in Chippy's honour for National Heart Week.


Coupons are being printed in The Daily Telegraph all week.


This weekend, Ray Hadley's Continuous Call team will help raise much-needed funds for the Peter Frilingos Appeal.


The usual band of misfits will be on radio, making the best of the hole they are left with.


Hopefully one of them will tell an atrocity story for old time's sake.


There is a stockpile waiting.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 06.05.2005

Peter Frilingos Tribute

Chippy's humour, honesty and spirit will never die

BY DEAN RITCHIE


Daily Telegraph, May 3, 2005, page 61.

IF only he was still around today. Rugby league – the game Peter Frilingos spoke about with pride – is at an all-time high at the moment.


A season Chippy would have passionately absorbed, enjoyed and analysed. Sadly, though, Chippy is not here today.

It was one year ago this afternoon he was taken from us by a heart attack.


But for those here at The Daily Telegraph, Chippy's legacy, humour, honesty and spirit will never die.


He was never short of a comment. Never short of an opinion.


Those opinions would have been aired time and again this season from the Newcastle drama, to Mundine, to Hopoate, to video referees.


It's almost as if we can hear what he would say . . .


Anthony Mundine: "He's not the sharpest tool in the shed."


John Hopoate: "In the fair dinkum department, he's a repeat offender."


The soccer riots in Sydney's west: "That's Fort Apache territory [anywhere west of the CBD]."


The Newcastle Knights-Bathurst scandal: "That'll do me [as he throws his hands up in the air]."


NRL's fine for Newcastle: "It came over like a bolo punch."


Lightweight Brett Finch involving himself in a brawl last week: "If they get a hold of him all that will be left is an eyebrow and the tongue out of his shoe."


Unknown Broncos rookie Leon Bott: "Where's he from? Reykjavik, Iceland?"


The 16-year-old suspended for 30 years: "He's an Olympic-class dill."


Hopoate again: "He's an imbecile [pronounced im-b-ceel]. Pull over and give yourself an upper-cut."


Princess Mary's past year: "She's been around the world more times than Yuri Gagarin."


Newcastle's Dane Tilse, the villain in Bathurst: "Isn't he a gibberer [followed by vibrating his lips with a finger]."


Video referee: "It's not rocket science"


A prediction: "Trust me, [as he gives a slow right wink], I know."


English referee Russell Smith: "What, is he speaking Swahili [or Lithuanian]."

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 06.05.2005

Peter Frilingos. Mimosimo. 1 year after his death.

Peter "Chippy" Frilingos Appeal

Monday 2 May 2005

Pictured: Left to Right:
Alison, Matthew, Anna, Maureen and Peter Frilingos


The Heart Foundation in conjunction with Radio 2GB and The Daily Telegraph are conducting an appeal during Heart Week in commemoration of Peter Frilingos.

Peter [Chippy] was one of Australia’s most respected sports journalists who died suddenly of a heart attack on 3rd May, 2004.

Funds raised in honour of Peter Frilingos will benefit a prestigious Heart Foundation Research Award in his name.

The Heart Foundation supports the highest quality cardiovascular research, providing major advances in knowledge that will lead to improved cardiovascular health and better prevention and management of cardiovascular health.

For over forty years the Heart Foundation has played a vital role in funding research into the causes, prevention, treatment and diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and related disorders.

Research supported by the Heart Foundation has made a significant contribution to the generation and application of new knowledge for the benefit of the Australian community. However, there is still much to be achieved as cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in Australia.

Donations can be made by calling 1800 179 114 or by sending your donation to:

The Peter Frilingos Appeal
National Heart Foundation Australia
GPO Box 9966 in your Capital City

http://www.heartfoundation.com.au/index.cfm?page=331

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by William Notaras on 26.04.2005

Angelo Notaras awarded the

Angelo Notaras with his wife Mary awarded the "Cross of St. Andrew", the Greek Orthodox Church's highest award - given for exceptional charitable work.

Angelo's wife Mary is the daughter of Vasily (Bill) Kalokerinos (Summers) of Alexandrathes (1905 - 1978) and Theodora (Glitsos) of Dokona (1910 - 1975)(see Photography Diaspora subsection Weddings & Proxinia for a photograph of the wedding of Mary's parents).

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Ball Sydney on 20.04.2005

Katrina Kastanias and Charles Tzannes. Debutante and partner.

Katrina Kastanias (daughter of Gary and Nita) and Charles Tzannes (son of John and Koula) making a spectacular entrance at the,

Kytherian Ball, 2004.

The 82nd Anniversary Debutante Ball
Saturday, 29th May, 2004
Star City Ballroom, Darling Harbour
Sydney

Guest of Honour
Kieren Perkins OAM
Olympic swimmer, Gold medallist

The Kytherian Ball is one of the major social attractions on the Sydney Social calendar.
It is the highlight of the Kytherian social year.
It is a very sophisticated event, which attracts up to 700 participants each year.

Do you have photographs from any of the past 80+ Kytherian Balls?

Please submit them!

Photograph courtesy of David Basioli
Flashworks Photography
6 Gay Street
Castle Hill NSW 2154

02 9899 3844
d.v.b@bigpond.com
www.flashworks.com.au

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Ball Sydney on 20.04.2005

Amanda Hill and Micheal Koutzoumis. Deb and Partner.

Amanda Hill (daughter of Ken and Margaret) and Micheal Koutzoumis (son of Alex and Annette), making a spectacular entrance at the,

Kytherian Ball, 2004.

The 82nd Anniversary Debutante Ball
Saturday, 29th May, 2004
Star City Ballroom, Darling Harbour
Sydney

Guest of Honour
Kieren Perkins OAM
Olympic swimmer, Gold medallist

The Kytherian Ball is one of the major social attractions on the Sydney Social calendar.
It is the highlight of the Kytherian social year.
It is a very sophisticated event, which attracts up to 700 participants each year.

Do you have photographs from any of the past 80+ Kytherian Balls?

Please submit them!

Photograph courtesy of David Basioli
Flashworks Photography
6 Gay Street
Castle Hill NSW 2154

02 9899 3844
d.v.b@bigpond.com
www.flashworks.com.au

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Ball Sydney on 20.04.2005

Matron of Honour, Debutantes, and their partners performing dance.

The Matron of Honour was Aphrodite Samios.

Kytherian Ball, 2004.

The 82nd Anniversary Debutante Ball
Saturday, 29th May, 2004
Star City Ballroom, Darling Harbour
Sydney

Guest of Honour
Kieren Perkins OAM
Olympic swimmer, Gold medallist

The Kytherian Ball is one of the major social attractions on the Sydney Social calendar.
It is the highlight of the Kytherian social year.
It is a very sophisticated event, which attracts up to 700 participants each year.

Do you have photographs from any of the past 80+ Kytherian Balls?

Please submit them!

Photograph courtesy of David Basioli
Flashworks Photography
6 Gay Street
Castle Hill NSW 2154

02 9899 3844
d.v.b@bigpond.com
www.flashworks.com.au

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by George Poulos on 09.04.2005

Vince Kalokerinos and family.

A photo of the Kalokerinos family at the 21st birthday of the twins Matthew and Kathy, taken in June 2003.

Left to right: John, Kathy, Viola, Matthew and Vince Kalokerinos.

For another entry about Vince Kalokerinos see Photography Diaspora, subsection, Vintage Portraits/People, or search Vince utilising the internal search engine.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by George Poulos on 08.12.2006

George Divas, head of the sole Greek family left in Gilgandra. 2004.

Standing in front of a very well kept olive tree. (George is a master "olive maker".)
He purchased from Tommy Colbrin the caravan park on the Coonamble Road.

In another entry about the Monterey Cafe in Gilgandra, I revealed that "...I was born in Gilgandra, in 1952, and left after completing my schooling in 1969.

From the beginning of WWII, until mid-1975 - Gilgandra, population, 2,900 - was a very Kytherian town.

5 families - the Pentes, Sklavos, Kelly (Yiannakellis), (wife Chris, a Yeoryopoulos, from Potamos), Psaltis (Protopsaltis), and Poulos (Tzortzopoulos) - lived in close proximity to each other - culturally, residentially, and commercially.

In the main, Kytherians embraced Kytherians - Gilgandra embraced Kytherians - and Kytherians embraced Gilgandra".

During the middle of the year 2004, I took my father, now 88 years old, on a nostalgia tour, back to Gilgandra, and through other towns in the Central and North West of New South Wales.

Not a single person of Kytherian origin now lives in Gilgandra.

I found of course, all the buildings, where the Kytherians had conducted their businesses; but all of these - with the exception of the Gilgandra Fruit Shop (my father's old shop), had substantially changed their usage.

George Divas's family was the only Greek family left in Gilgandra, and he told me that he was contemplating leaving in the next few years.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Jim Saltis on 16.03.2005

Jim Saltis

At the 2005 Aroney Awards, held at the Twin Restaurant, 560 Botany Road, Alexandria, on Saturday 5th March.

Jim is the author of

The Four Homes

Author: Protopsaltis Dimitris ( Jim Saltis)
When Published:September 2004
Publisher:STAFILIDIS PUBLICATIONS Athens GREECE. Price 12 Euros.
Available:Kytherian Association of Australia, and Jim Saltis Ph. 93999767 email saltisjim@optusnet.com.au

Description:ΤΑ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΑ ΣΠΙΤΙΑ. ΜΥ FOUR HOMES.

PUBLISHER: STAFILIDIS PUBLICATIONS
COPYRIGHT. DIMITRIS A. STAFILIDIS

A book by Dimitris Protopsaltis ( Blaveri), known in Australia as Jim Saltis
Available through the Kytherian Association or the author JIM SALTIS
Phone 93999767 or email saltisjim@optusnet.com.au
PRICE: $20.00

The book is about growing up in the dynamic Greek community of Alexandria, Egypt during the Depression and right through the affluence that the WW2 brought to the city. It is narrative about the second Hellenistic époque in the History of this glorious city.
Although it appears to be autobiographical it is in reality a mosaic of people that the author encountered during his growing up in Egypt. Their own and the author’s “ yom assal yom basal” as the Egyptians say, days of honey and days of onion. It is written in the distinctive Greek Alexandrine dialect, daringly sincere to the point of embarrassment,
The following independent anonymous critique describes the mood of this compacted literary attempt.


THE FOUR HOMES
Alexandria as I lived it (1926 till 1949)


Australia became his second country but Alexandria took roots to his heart and his memories of the twenty-three years that he lived there, are deeply etched in his memory and his heart and signposted his subsequent journey.
Dimitris Protopsaltis, a Greek from Egypt, remembers and reminisces the good and bad moments when he lived in a country so much different from Greece, a country filled with mystery and wisdom, where a mixture of civilisations is trying to coexist, struggling for a better tomorrow.
In a period of upheaval and a period of critical historic developments, a Greek from Egypt is confronted with the common destiny of all the foreigners in Egypt, the expulsion and uprooting.
In his troubled childhood when the affluence and the poverty alternate following the historical developments, the romanticism, the eros, the friendship, refuses to submit to the harsh reality. They remain lively sentiments creating the heroes (real people) that are approachable and ordinary with human dimensions.
The conditions that the author lived are familiar to the Greeks from Egypt. But the manner that he is presenting them is simple yet at the same time gently he renders
them a possession for everyone.
The reader together with the author lives as an adolescent, an adult and attains manhood in Alexandria of yesterday that never returns.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 04.03.2005

Steve Kapetanios (Tzortzo)Poulos, gives himself up at

...the Karavitiko Symposium, held on Sunday 13th February 2005, at The Castellorizian Club, Kingsford.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 05.04.2005

Mrs Doreen Moulos.

At the Karavitiko Symposium, held on Sunday 13th February 2005, at The Castellorizian Club, Kingsford.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 05.04.2005

Steve Zantiotis and Jack Moulos,

Looking "relaxed and comfortable" at the Karavitiko Symposium, held on Sunday 13th February 2005, at The Castellorizian Club, Kingsford.

Jack is in the foreground on the right.