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Architecture / Mylopotamos

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Photos > Architecture

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 31.07.2012

Water mills look like little sheds or houses.

We are certain that visitors to Kythera pass them every day - without realising that they are water mills - and why the canals feed into them.

Water travelled along a series of canals, througout Mylopotamos - all interlinked. Water would fall from a height into a designated water mill wheel, turning the wheel, and then the stone, and hence crushing the wheat.

Mills were owned by individual families.

Those who grew wheat, but had no mills, would bring their wheat - often with great difficulty - to the mill on a designated day.

A week later - the miller would have the flour ready for "pick up".

Once the water had passed through a mill - it would move on - further down the canals, to "turn another mill".

The engineering principles involved were quite ingenious.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 31.07.2012

A water canal at Mylopotamos which fed the numerous water mills in the area

Water travelled along a series of canals, througout Mylopotamos - ll interlinked. Water would fall from a height into a designated water mill wheel, turning the wheel, and then the stone, and hence crushing the wheat.

Mills were owned by individual families.

Those who grew wheat, but had no mills, would bring their wheat - often with great difficulty - to the mill on a designated day.

A week later - the miller would have the flour ready for "pick up".

Once the water had passed through a mill - it would move on - further down the canals, to "turn another mill".

The engineering principles involved were quite ingenious.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Kristina Williamson on 11.02.2013

Interior of one of the abandonned watermills of Mylopotamos

This image is part of a photographic documentary series entitled “One Year on Kythera”. “One Year on Kythera” was created by photographer Kristina Williamson, who spent one calender year living on Kythera, documenting the lives of Kytherians today; what aspects of traditional life remain in practice and in what ways the island is changing..

For more information on this project please visit www.oneyearonkythera.com

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 03.10.2005

neo classical

fine example of neo classical architecture that features all over the island.this magnificant restored home is in the village of mylopotamos.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Gary Smith on 06.08.2005

Blue Door

A striking blue door at Mylopotomos.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Gary Smith on 06.08.2005

Golden Door

I love the brave use of strong colors on building exteriors

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Poulos on 06.12.2004

Mylopotamos. c. 1950.

Classical Sophios photograph of Mylopotamos, possibly taken in the 1950's.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Vardas on 18.05.2004

Beach hut

This quaint beach hut is located at Limionas, a beach just below Myloptamos.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 27.03.2004

Kytherian home

Inside a home in Milopotamos. With aussie flavor comes complete with boomarang.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 26.03.2004

Mylopotamos Home

TRADITIONAL GREEK FAMILY HOME COULD BE HUNDRED'S OF YEARS OLD.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 13.03.2004

NEO CLASSICAL ARCHITECTURE

LOVELY OLD HOMES IN MILOPOTAMOS

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Harry Feros on 12.08.2003

Detail of Symbol

Detail of a picture which is part of an entry in the Architecture section of this website. Does anyone know what the symbol means or where it comes from?

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Harry Feros on 12.08.2003

Mylopotamos Entrance?

This picture is part of an entry in the Archictecture section of this website. I'm not sure if it was taken in Mylopotamos or in Hora.