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History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

COMINOS CAFÉ: THE CAIRNS’ LEGEND

Coffee Sales Cominos Café

For several decades, Cominos Café acted as the social hub of Cairns and nearby towns. Established in 1906 as a small catering business, it grew to become one of ‘Australia’s most modern cafés’, which at one stage employed over 100 people.
For most of the time the café was situated in Abbott St, on the site of today’s ‘Orchid Plaza’ shopping centre. It occupied two floors with a mezzanine area and provided its customers with high quality food and drinks as well as with a range of services appreciated especially by country clients on visits to Cairns: showers, toilets and rest rooms.
Cominos was a ‘departmental’ café: it had a cake counter, sandwich counter, milk bar, sweets counter as well as a bakery. George Cominos paid the utmost attention to all details creating a relaxing and welcoming atmosphere: cages of birds placed all over the café entertained the customers!
The place was well-known far beyond Cairns for the high standards of food and services as well as for the progressive ideas of its owner. For instance, in 1935 George Cominos installed in the bakery the first electric industrial oven in this part of Australia.
The café served as a venue for many big social functions such as wedding receptions, as well as a rest place for visitors to Cairns. During the Second World War it became a favourite meeting place for Allied service staff based in Far North Queensland.
In 1952, due to declining health, George Cominos decided to close the Café. However even today the legend of ‘Cominos Café’ lives on in the fond memories of many Cairns residents.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House.

Delivered Greenslopes Street.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House.

Relocated. Drawing.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House.

Relocated.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House.

Elevation plans..

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House, Cairns.

Floor Plans.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House, Cairns.

Elevation diagrams.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House, Cairns.

Restoration, Stage Two.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Conimos House, Cairns.

Stage One. Restoration.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House, Cairns, on the move.

Cominos House had to be transported from its original location.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 15.08.2005

Cominos House, Cairns.

Now, a cultural centre.

History > Photography

submitted by Society of Kytherian Studies on 11.08.2005

History > Photography

submitted by Society of Kytherian Studies on 09.08.2005

Nikos Petrochilos.

Professor of Latin Literature in the Philosophic School of the University of Thessaloniki

Prof. Nicholas Petrochilos was born in Athens, but he comes from the island of Kythera (Ionian islands). He graduated from the Philosophic School of the University of Athens (1960) and taught as a secondary school teacher of Philology in the state schools of Greece.

Later (1968), he was selected among many other candidates for a two-year refresher course at Pedagogics (he graduated in 1970), and soon afterwards was awarded a scholarship from the State Scholarship Foundation of Greece for postgraduate studies in England. He studied Latin Literature at the University of London (Westfield College) for three years and obtained his Ph.D. in 1973.

His dissertation for his Ph.D. was published in 1974 under the title Roman Attitudes to the Greeks. It was translated into Greek (1984) by two scholars of the University of Thessaloniki. Many favourable reviews of his thesis were published in various classical periodicals all over the world.

In 1974 he was appointed Lecturer at the University of Athens, and in 1977 was unanimously elected Associate Professor of Latin Literature in the Philosophic School of the University of Thessaloniki. Three years later he was elected, unanimously again, Full Professor at the same University. He had an early retirement, in 1987, and was appointed Emeritus Professor.

Apart from his work as a translator and commentator of Latin Historical Texts into modern Greek [ Sallust and Suetonius, in all their works, have already been published in three volumes by the Cultural Foundation of the National Bank of Greece, and the whole work of Tacitus (6 volumes) has been completed, and it remains to be published by the Cultural Foundation mentioned above ].

Professor Petrochilos continued his teaching career as a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Crete, Athens and Cyprus. His translations of Seneca's De vita beata (On happy life) (1996), De tranquillitate animi (On the tranquillity of the mind) (1997), and De brevitate vitae (On the brevity of life) (1997), as well as of Erasmos : De recta Latini Graecique sermonis pronuntiatione dialogus ( = on the right pronunciation of Latin and Greek), Athens 2000, pp. 253, have been all published by Patakis editions, at Athens.

He has also written and published various works on the cultural relations between the two most eminent peoples of the ancient world, the Greeks and the Romans, on Roman epic poetry --particularly on Virgil's Aeneid - as well as on many other areas of Roman culture and civilisation (drama, politics, everyday life, etc.). He has participated in many conferences, in Greece and abroad, and presided at many of them. He was President of the National Theatre of Greece (1989-1990) and is now a member of various Societies in Greece and abroad. He speaks English, German and Italian.


To see a full list of his published work, go to the entry concerning Nikos Petrochilos at People, subsection, High Achievers.

History > Photography

submitted by Stephen Samios on 30.07.2005

Ancient Ramparts on the Island of Kythera.

Spatial Science Innovation Unit, Sydney University.

http://www.ssiu.org.usyd.edu.au/html/gallery/gallery24.html

History > Photography

submitted by Stephen Samios on 30.07.2005

Arcsene reproduction of...

..a Byzantine Fort on the Greek Island of Kythera.

Spatial Science Innovation Unit, Sydney University.

http://www.ssiu.org.usyd.edu.au/html/gallery/gallery27.html

History > Photography

submitted by Stephen Samios on 30.07.2005

Churches of Kythera. A Map.

From the Spatial Science Innovation Unit, University of NSW.

History > Photography

submitted by Dean Coroneos on 11.12.2006

Joyce Ryerson. Founder of the Ryerson index.

Hatched, matched and dispatched … Joyce Ryerson at work on the Ryerson Index, which is about to celebrate its millionth entry.
Photo: Edwina Pickles

The Ryerson Index

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nswsdps/papers.htm

An Important research tool for Kytherians searching their genealogical roots in Australia.

How Joyce's list became the toast of cyberspace

By Steve Meacham
July 26, 2005

Sydney Morning Herald. Tuesday July 26th. 2005. Page 5.

At 88, Joyce Ryerson never expected to become an internet celebrity, the darling of "the genies". "It's got a bit silly," she says. People "come up to me and say, 'Are you the Ryerson of the Ryerson Index?"'
And when she confesses? "They treat me as if I am a God or something."
Few outside the gentle world of genealogy have ever heard of the Ryerson Index. But at next month's meeting of the "Dead Persons Society" (after the 1989 film, Dead Poets Society), they'll be cracking open the champagne. The Ryerson Index is celebrating its millionth entry.

For seven years, an army of 120 volunteers has spent countless hours combing through the birth, death and marriage columns of The Sydney Morning Herald.
With painstaking precision, the genies - as genealogists light-heartedly call themselves - have taken each fragment of information about a person and catalogued it on the web.

According to the index's organiser, John Graham, the project is the biggest of its type in the world.
It is an invaluable tool for any Australian trying to trace their family tree because privacy laws mean there is no public index of deaths in NSW after 1985, though many relatives of people who have died in NSW still place death notices in the Herald.

Yet the index owes its advancement to a human quirk. For 14 years, Joyce Ryerson took her Herald every morning, cut out the requisite columns, and then hoarded them in her laundry. She wasn't a genealogist then, merely helping to compile a register of former pupils of her old school, SCEGGS Darlinghurst.

But when she mentioned the contents of her laundry to fellow members of the Dead Persons Society, there was jubilation.
"It took me a few minutes to pick my jaw off the ground," Mr Graham said. "To a genealogist, it's a goldmine. I was in that laundry the next day. To the unrestrained joy of my wife, I arrived home with the boot of the car stuffed with death notices." His team set to work, converting the newspaper death notices into data that would prove invaluable to web-based family historians around the world for generations to come.

History > Photography

submitted by Melanie Scinto on 24.06.2006

George Arthur Protos

 

History > Photography

submitted by John Coroneos on 07.07.2005

James Coroneos, wife Toula, and young son John.

James (Jim) Coroneos

Jim was born on 1st May 1925 in Gunning, NSW near Goulbourn.

His parents were Christophoros Melasofaos Coroneos & Melopomeni Comino from Karava in Kythera, who came to Australia, where they started a café in Gunning, named The Busy Bee.

Jim was the oldest of 6 children, and was very close to his brothers and sisters and their spouses - Charles and Mary, Annie and George, Matty and Mick, George and Betsy, Peter and Lyn. He will be sorely missed by them and their families.

Jim began his schooling at Gunning Primary School where he showed a lot of promise and ability.

He then continued on at Goulbourn High School, where he lived with his Aunty Georgina and Uncle George. He would arrive home on the weekends, help out in the café, and play Rugby with friends, which he had a passion for throughout the years.

Due to his high intelligence, he was able to win a scholarship to Sydney University. There he achieved a Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Education.

As you would be aware, Jim excelled in Mathematics, and commenced his teaching at country schools, including Goulbourn, Leeton and Yanko High Schools. He then taught in Sydney at North Sydney Boys, Cleveland St, Fort St, South Sydney and Vaucluse High Schools.

He found that many students had missed the fundamentals of mathematics, and he seemed to have a natural ability to teach them these basic concepts. He was a dedicated educator, and was passionate about helping his students reach their full potential.

He used to prepare detailed worksheets for his classes, which were well sought after by many teachers from different schools. This is when he decided to put these worksheets into a book. So, in 1964 he compiled them into his first publication, originally in his own handwriting (not typed).

He discovered that the market for these books were far beyond his expectations. So he had to learn the new skills of publishing and distribution to bookshops, schools, parents and students.

Because of his ability in Mathematics, he was invited to join University professors in setting the Higher School certificate examination papers. He also lectured at the Technical College and Sydney University.

In 1972, he chose to leave teaching and continue publishing and writing due to his wife Toula’s encouragement. He and Toula formed Coroneos Publishing, a leader in the field of Mathematics and educational books.
See:
http://www.coroneos.com.au/
Jim was a prolific author, writing over 120 titles himself & publishing more than 300.

Jim’s name is synonymous with Mathematics & teaching in NSW, something for which he felt a great honour. His family and friends are very proud of his achievements and all that he has accomplished throughout the years. His committment and service to providing students, and parents, with the best educational information and advice was exemplary. To Jim, “everyone was a pupil”. A well known catchcry in NSW schools was not to bring out your maths books, but to “bring out your Coroneos”.

Jim met his wife, Toula at a Greek dance in Sydney, and they married in 1959. That union brought about 3 children. John, who is a medical doctor, Paul, who is a pharmacist and Suzanne, who is married to Michael. They have 3 beautiful girls who adored their grandfather, and who were adored by him. He often said he was lucky to see his grandchildren grow up in front of his eyes every day.

Jim always tried to guide his family in the right direction, and was very supportive and pleased with his children’s achievements.

He was the central figure for his family and friends, and the organizer of many get togethers and reunions.

He had a special place in his heart for his oldest friends and Koubari, Peter and Tina Andrew, and for the camping trips and family outings they used to share together. And he was also very grateful to know and have so many other close friends.

He belonged to various charitable organisations, including the Order of AHEPA, the Grand Lodge of AHEPA, and he was a President of Chapter Prometheus for some considerable time.

He was also a great supporter of the St George Greek Orthodox Chuch and St Spyridon’s College in Adelaide.

But we feel his greatest bond was with the Kytherian Brotherhood of Australia, of which he was a President and committee member for many years. He organised the Karavitiko Symposium over many decades; acting as both President and Patron. He he felt very strongly, and was very passionate about, his Kytherian heritage.

He was very much a people’s person, always active and full of energy. He always had the time to do whatever was required and asked of him. His generous heart was experienced by many people throughout his life.

He has and always will be highly respected and loved by many, and today we are paying our respects to a unique man, who had so much to offer us all.

He will forever remain in our hearts and minds. All of us who knew and were influenced by Jim have been blessed and privileged. He will be sadly missed, not only by his family and friends, but by everyone who had the pleasure to know him.

Jim Coroneos died on the 13th May, 2005.

Photographs of Jim, Jim's parents, brothers and sisters, the family tree, family documents, and the Busy Bee are all available at other locations on the web-site. [Search internally under Coroneos, or Melasofaos.]

History > Photography

submitted by John Coroneos on 07.07.2005

James Coroneos, being honoured by Justice Kirby; Judge, High Court of Australia.

James (Jim) Coroneos

Jim was born on 1st May 1925 in Gunning, NSW near Goulbourn.

His parents were Christophoros Melasofaos Coroneos & Melopomeni Comino from Karava in Kythera, who came to Australia, where they started a café in Gunning, named The Busy Bee.

Jim was the oldest of 6 children, and was very close to his brothers and sisters and their spouses - Charles and Mary, Annie and George, Matty and Mick, George and Betsy, Peter and Lyn. He will be sorely missed by them and their families.

Jim began his schooling at Gunning Primary School where he showed a lot of promise and ability.

He then continued on at Goulbourn High School, where he lived with his Aunty Georgina and Uncle George. He would arrive home on the weekends, help out in the café, and play Rugby with friends, which he had a passion for throughout the years.

Due to his high intelligence, he was able to win a scholarship to Sydney University. There he achieved a Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Education.

As you would be aware, Jim excelled in Mathematics, and commenced his teaching at country schools, including Goulbourn, Leeton and Yanko High Schools. He then taught in Sydney at North Sydney Boys, Cleveland St, Fort St, South Sydney and Vaucluse High Schools.

He found that many students had missed the fundamentals of mathematics, and he seemed to have a natural ability to teach them these basic concepts. He was a dedicated educator, and was passionate about helping his students reach their full potential.

He used to prepare detailed worksheets for his classes, which were well sought after by many teachers from different schools. This is when he decided to put these worksheets into a book. So, in 1964 he compiled them into his first publication, originally in his own handwriting (not typed).

He discovered that the market for these books were far beyond his expectations. So he had to learn the new skills of publishing and distribution to bookshops, schools, parents and students.

Because of his ability in Mathematics, he was invited to join University professors in setting the Higher School certificate examination papers. He also lectured at the Technical College and Sydney University.

In 1972, he chose to leave teaching and continue publishing and writing due to his wife Toula’s encouragement. He and Toula formed Coroneos Publishing, a leader in the field of Mathematics and educational books.
See:
http://www.coroneos.com.au/
Jim was a prolific author, writing over 120 titles himself & publishing more than 300.

Jim’s name is synonymous with Mathematics & teaching in NSW, something for which he felt a great honour. His family and friends are very proud of his achievements and all that he has accomplished throughout the years. His committment and service to providing students, and parents, with the best educational information and advice was exemplary. To Jim, “everyone was a pupil”. A well known catchcry in NSW schools was not to bring out your maths books, but to “bring out your Coroneos”.

Jim met his wife, Toula at a Greek dance in Sydney, and they married in 1959. That union brought about 3 children. John, who is a medical doctor, Paul, who is a pharmacist and Suzanne, who is married to Michael. They have 3 beautiful girls who adored their grandfather, and who were adored by him. He often said he was lucky to see his grandchildren grow up in front of his eyes every day.

Jim always tried to guide his family in the right direction, and was very supportive and pleased with his children’s achievements.

He was the central figure for his family and friends, and the organizer of many get togethers and reunions.

He had a special place in his heart for his oldest friends and Koubari, Peter and Tina Andrew, and for the camping trips and family outings they used to share together. And he was also very grateful to know and have so many other close friends.

He belonged to various charitable organisations, including the Order of AHEPA, the Grand Lodge of AHEPA, and he was a President of Chapter Prometheus for some considerable time.

He was also a great supporter of the St George Greek Orthodox Chuch and St Spyridon’s College in Adelaide.

But we feel his greatest bond was with the Kytherian Brotherhood of Australia, of which he was a President and committee member for many years. He organised the Karavitiko Symposium over many decades; acting as both President and Patron. He he felt very strongly, and was very passionate about, his Kytherian heritage.

He was very much a people’s person, always active and full of energy. He always had the time to do whatever was required and asked of him. His generous heart was experienced by many people throughout his life.

He has and always will be highly respected and loved by many, and today we are paying our respects to a unique man, who had so much to offer us all.

He will forever remain in our hearts and minds. All of us who knew and were influenced by Jim have been blessed and privileged. He will be sadly missed, not only by his family and friends, but by everyone who had the pleasure to know him.

Jim Coroneos died on the 13th May, 2005.

Photographs of Jim, Jim's parents, brothers and sisters, the family tree, family documents, and the Busy Bee are all available at other locations on the web-site. [Search internally under Coroneos, or Melasofaos.]