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History > Photography

submitted by Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) on 14.10.2005

Brinos Notaras in front of a stack of blackbutt boards, drying.

Blackbutt, or Eucalyptus pilularis, has been one of the mainstays of the New South Wales timber industry for more than a century. Howard Spencer talks to north coast sawmillers Spiro and Brinos Notaras about the quality and various uses of this native timber.

Growing up to a height of 45 metres with a diameter of 1.2 metres, blackbutt gets its common name from the bark around the base, which changes to a smooth surface towards the upper trunk and limbs.

Blackbutt is plentiful in State forests, occurring on various soils but making better progress on light, deep loams. It is one of the most common coastal trees and reproduces readily from natural seeding. Blackbutt contributes around 22 per cent of the State's timber production, well ahead of the next two major native forest timbers, cypress pine and spotted gum, which each deliver about 14 per cent. Blackbutt is also one of the major species being planted in State Forests' hardwood plantation program.

Timber from blackbutt has been used for a wide variety of purposes, including general joinery, feature flooring, veneers, sleepers, poles and girders. It is widely used in bridge building but is equally at home in all facets of home-building.

And the sawmillers just love it.

According to veteran Grafton millers, Spiro and Brinos Notaras of J. Notaras & Sons, blackbutt lays flatter than spotted gum, another major species, and there is not as much tension in the wood as either spotted gum or ironbark.

"We've sawn blackbutt since we started the mill in 1952," says Spiro.

"But since State Forests introduced log merchandising we have seen a lot more of it. Now it is nearly 15 per cent of our business."

The Notaras blackbutt comes from State forests like Clouds Creek, Wild Cattle Creek and elsewhere in the Dorrigo area. It is milled within a week or two of harvest, where it is sawn to board dimension, stripped for air drying for around two months, then spends three weeks in the kiln drying to nine or 10 per cent moisture level. After a short equalisation in the shed, its final process is steam reconditioning.

"We are continually testing and learning," Spiro said.

"The blackbutt looks good, and has more of an even colour than other species. There can be a bit of variation in native regrowth blackbutt, while plantation blackbutt is lighter."

The Notaras mill has just completed a trial operation with State Forests where blackbutt logs were computer-tracked through the harvest and milling process to the finished board. The results will assist in determining how best to grow and treat blackbutt from seedling to sale in the future.

Notaras blackbutt goes into products as diverse as basketball courts, because of its superior fire rating against other timbers, and into household and commercial flooring, parquetry, decking and furniture.

Other products from this universal timber end up in mixed hardwood lots sold to New Zealand, and in mixed hardwood floors that are a feature of many Queenslander style homes north of the border.

With valuable applications like these, blackbutt will continue to be an important timber species for many years to come.

Howard Spencer
Public Affairs, Coffs Harbour


NSW Department of Primary Industries site:

http://www.forest.nsw.gov.au/bush/aug01/stories/23.asp

History > Photography

submitted by Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) on 14.10.2005

Above: Blackbutt logs in the J. Notaras & Sons yard at South Grafton.

Blackbutt, or Eucalyptus pilularis, has been one of the mainstays of the New South Wales timber industry for more than a century. Howard Spencer talks to north coast sawmillers Spiro and Brinos Notaras about the quality and various uses of this native timber.

Growing up to a height of 45 metres with a diameter of 1.2 metres, blackbutt gets its common name from the bark around the base, which changes to a smooth surface towards the upper trunk and limbs.

Blackbutt is plentiful in State forests, occurring on various soils but making better progress on light, deep loams. It is one of the most common coastal trees and reproduces readily from natural seeding. Blackbutt contributes around 22 per cent of the State's timber production, well ahead of the next two major native forest timbers, cypress pine and spotted gum, which each deliver about 14 per cent. Blackbutt is also one of the major species being planted in State Forests' hardwood plantation program.

Timber from blackbutt has been used for a wide variety of purposes, including general joinery, feature flooring, veneers, sleepers, poles and girders. It is widely used in bridge building but is equally at home in all facets of home-building.

And the sawmillers just love it.

According to veteran Grafton millers, Spiro and Brinos Notaras of J. Notaras & Sons, blackbutt lays flatter than spotted gum, another major species, and there is not as much tension in the wood as either spotted gum or ironbark.

"We've sawn blackbutt since we started the mill in 1952," says Spiro.

"But since State Forests introduced log merchandising we have seen a lot more of it. Now it is nearly 15 per cent of our business."

The Notaras blackbutt comes from State forests like Clouds Creek, Wild Cattle Creek and elsewhere in the Dorrigo area. It is milled within a week or two of harvest, where it is sawn to board dimension, stripped for air drying for around two months, then spends three weeks in the kiln drying to nine or 10 per cent moisture level. After a short equalisation in the shed, its final process is steam reconditioning.

"We are continually testing and learning," Spiro said.

"The blackbutt looks good, and has more of an even colour than other species. There can be a bit of variation in native regrowth blackbutt, while plantation blackbutt is lighter."

The Notaras mill has just completed a trial operation with State Forests where blackbutt logs were computer-tracked through the harvest and milling process to the finished board. The results will assist in determining how best to grow and treat blackbutt from seedling to sale in the future.

Notaras blackbutt goes into products as diverse as basketball courts, because of its superior fire rating against other timbers, and into household and commercial flooring, parquetry, decking and furniture.

Other products from this universal timber end up in mixed hardwood lots sold to New Zealand, and in mixed hardwood floors that are a feature of many Queenslander style homes north of the border.

With valuable applications like these, blackbutt will continue to be an important timber species for many years to come.

Howard Spencer
Public Affairs, Coffs Harbour


NSW DEpartment of Primary Industries site:

http://www.forest.nsw.gov.au/bush/aug01/stories/23.asp

History > Photography

submitted by Society of Kytherian Studies on 14.10.2005

Emmanuel P Kalligeros.

Emmanuel P. Kalligeros was born in Kythera in 1949, where he finished High School. He studied Political Sciences in Athens and worked for many years as executive of foreign banks. Now, he works in the Commercial Bank of Greece.

Since 1988 he has published monthly, the newspaper Kythiraika. Since 1991, he has also published the Historical and Tourist Book Guide Kythira, which is published in five languages, and of which multiple editions habe been printed.

His book Venus was born here – Synoptic History of Kythira, was published in 1996 It has been re-orinted three times.

He has written many articles in newspapers and magazines, regarding economic, banking and tourist issues. He is Vice President at the Society of Kytherian Studies and contributes actively to the Society's publishing programme.

BOOKS

2002 Kytherian Surnames, Society of Kytherian Studies.

2001. Kythira - Historic and Tourist Book Guide – Greek Edition, Kythiraika.

2001 Kythira - Historic and Tourist Guide – English Edition, Kythiraika.

2001 Venus was born here - Synoptic History of Kythira. Kythiraika.

2001 Kytherian Books of registry – Temple of St. John the Forerunner of Strapodi. Society of Kytherian Studies.

2000 Kythira - Ein Reisebegleiter zu der Insel – German Edition, Kythiraika

2000 Kithira – Guida turistica con cenni storici – Italian Edition, (Exhaustivited), Kythiraika

1998 Kytherian Exercise Books – History – Archaeology – Art – Storiology, Chronicles of priest Daniil Varipati – Chrysea, Kythiraika

1996 Cythere – Guide Historique et Touristique – French Edition, (Exhaustivited), Kythiraika

1993 The Kytherians of Smirni and the lost homelands. Society of Kytherian Studies

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 05.10.2005

Old stone house near Fratsia.

Painting by George Tzannes.

Detailed information about George Tzannes

See also

http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeoxdoo/tzannesart/

Stone House" Lithograph, 41 cm x 51 cm. Edition 200, 1978
Architecture: Old stone house near Fratsia.

History > Photography

submitted by George Poulos on 28.09.2005

Theo Corones.

As a young man in his 20's. Taken whilst he was acting as a groomsman at his Uncle Dimitri's wedding.

For a more extensive life history of Theo Corones.

Theothosios Koroneos - Theo Corones - was sponsored to Australia, as a youth, by his maternal uncle George, and aunty Georgia, later of Beverley Hills.

He lost a leg to an infection in his early twenties.

Part of his rehabilitation involved art therapy. He later became quite a famous artist in "Kytherian" circles.

He settled in Sydney, and drove cabs for many decades, before attempting later in life to re-establish himself in Karavas, Kythera.

He returned to Australia, and retired to the North Queensland coastal town of Bargara.

Theo in retirement in Bargara. Rainbow lorikeets in hand

Theo had a great sense of humour and an infectious laugh. He was a "soft-hearted" man. He was extremely good with children and animals. (As this particular picture attests. The rainbow lorikeets in the picture are "wild".)

As a child, and throughout my life, it always made me feel good to be around him.

My brother Phillip, and many of my cousins, including George Krithari, and his sister Ioanna (now, Armenis), and Betty Coroneos, (now, York) - shared this deep fascination with him.

Despite being the opposite of the quintissential "solid", business-oriented Kytherian prototype; which all good Kytherians were meant to aspire to - he commanded a great deal of affection from many Kytherians, and many Australians, of all ages.

Theo, in 1931, as a 6 year old, alongside his mother, and two sisters

Theo as a groomsman at his Uncle Dimitri's wedding

Theo, in 1960, at age 35, alongside his brothers and sisters

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Bouras on 25.09.2005

John Nicholas Comino

Born in Sydney, on the 28 March 1951.
His parents were Nicholas John Comino & Garyfallia Comino (nee, Kontakos).

His paternal grandfather was John Kominos who was known as the Oyster King and migrated to Australia from Kythera in 1884 on board the Potosi joining his brother Athanassios who had migrated in 1879.

Biographies of John D and Athanassios D Kominos

Grandfather John Kominos, was instrumental in writing and publishing the Book; Life in Australia, in 1917.

Hugh Gilchrist's history of the publication of Life in Australia

The family village is Perlengianika near Lianianika in Kythera and the nickname (paratsoukli) is Skordilis.

John Comino (the grandson) was educated at Sydney Grammar School between 1956 and 1968.

He then studied Law through the University of Sydney Law Extension Committee and the Solicitors Admission Board.

He was admitted as a Solicitor of the Supreme Court of New South Wales in June 1974, and has been practising continuously since that date.

He became a Solicitor of the High Court of Australia in 1975.

He was admitted as a Notary Public by the Archbishop of Canterbury in England in 1985.

He qualified as a trained Mediator in October 1996.

In September 1995, he was elected as a Local Government Councillor to Woollahra Municipal Council (in Sydney's Eastern Suburbs).

In 1999 and 2004 he was re-elected to Woollahra Council and has served on major Committees both as Councillor and Chairman. These Committees include the Urban Planning Committee, Development Control Committee, Strategic Planning Working Party and Legal Committee.

From 2001 to 2004 he served as Mayor of Woollahra Council, having become the first person of Greek Descent to be elected either as Councillor or Mayor to that Council.

In 2003, he joined the Board of the Hellenic Club, Sydney, (established 1926), and in 2004, was elected to the Office of President.

He is married to Elly, and they have two children, a daughter Jana born in 1987, and a son Christopher born, 1988.

Last year he had the honour of being invited to deliver a Paper on Kytherian Identity, at the First International Symposium of Kytheraismos, held on Kythera.

John Comino's paper on Kytherian Identity.

John maintains a law practice in Bondi Junction.

See,

www.cominoprassas.com

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 20.09.2005

Kyriakos D Kentrotis

Nationality: Greek
Date / Place of Birth: June 27, 1962 / Molai
Office Address: Ionian University, DFLTI Megaro Capodistria,
491 00 Corfu
Position: Senior Assistant Professor, European Relations & German Translation, Department of Foreign Languages, Translation and Interpreting (DFLTI), Ionian University, Corfu

Kytherian Background

I was born in Molai, Greece. I am Kytherian through my father, and am registered in his village - Fratsia.
In Fratsia we are also related to persons with the name Kentrotianika.
We have many relatives in the cities of Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia.

Είμαι Κυθήριος από την οικογένεια του πατέρα μου και συγκεκριμένα από τα Φράτσια. Μάλιστα, στο χωριό υπάρχει και συνοικία με το όνομα Κεντρωτιάνικα (κάποτε, τον 19ο αώνα ήταν και Δήμος). Εγώ, δεν γεννήθηκα στα Φράτσια, αλλά είμαι γραμμένος στα Μητρώα Αρρένων της πρώην Κοινότητας Φρατσίων (σήμερα Κυθήρων). Υπάρχουν αρκετοί συγγενείς με το ίδιο επίθετο στη Mελβούρνη και στο Brisbane

QUALIFICATIONS

1991 Ph.D., University of Kaiserslautern/F.R.Germany
1985 Degree in Political Science, Department of Political Science, University of Athens, Greece

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2000 Assistant Professor, DFLTI, Ionian University, Corfu, Greece
1996-00 Teaching and Research Fellow, DFLTI, Ionian University, Corfu, Greece
1992-00 Research associate, Institute for Balkan Studies, Thessaloniki, Greece

LANGUANGES

English, German, French, Italian, Bulgarian

IONIAN UNIVERSITY

(Membership)
Member of Special Research Fund
Member of DFLTI' s Library Supervising Committee

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

2003, Theseus and the Minotaur: The thread of CFSP and external relations of the EU, Geolab Library Series, Papazissis Publishers, Athens, 338 p. (in Greek).
2002, K. Kentrotis / S. Katsios, International Organizations. Between War and Peace, Papazisis Editions, Athens, 487 p. (in Greek).
2001, «Minorities and Politics in the Balkan Nations: Images and Stereotypes», Hellenic Quarterly, No 10, Athens, 55 - 58.
2000, «Bulgaria and the Question of Kossovo» in V. Karakostanoglou. K.Kentrotis, E. Manta, S. Sfetas, Kosovo and the Albanian Populations of theBalkans, Institute for Balkan Studies (257), Thessaloniki, pp. 361-384 (in Greek).
1999, Aeronautical Manoeuvres in the Aegean Sea. Greece-Turkey: International Law and Geopolitics, Proskinio Editions, Athens, 247p. (in Greek).
1998, «The Geopolitics of Energy in Southeastern Europe. The Case of Oil and Gas Pipelines», Balkan Studies, vol. 39/2, Thessaloniki, 323-338.
1998, «Greece and Bulgaria at the Crossroads of two centuries: From the Experiences of the Past to the Challenges of the Future», Journal of Modern Hellenism, vol. 15, New York, 31-50.
1997, «International Status of Minorities: the Case of the Balkans», Balkan Studies, vol.38/2, Thessaloniki, 355-373.
1995, «Bulgaria»,Th. Veremis (ed.), Balkans. From the Bipolar System to the New Age, Athens, ELIAMEP & Gnosi Editions, 219-433 (in Greek).
1995, «Myths and Realities about Minorities in Greece: The Case of the Moslem Chams in Epirus», Lyubov Grigorova-Mincheva (ed.), Comparative Balkan Parliamentarism, International Center for Minority Studies and Intercultural Relations, Sofia 1995,149-155.
1995, «The Macedonian Question as presented in the German Press (1990-1994)», Balkan Studies, 36/2, Thessaloniki, 319-326.
1994, «Echoes from past: Greece and the Macedonian Controversy», Mediterranean Politics, Vol.1, 85-103.
1994, «Der Verlauf der griechisch-albanischen Beziehungen nach dem II. Weltkrieg und die Frage der muslimischen Tschamen», Balkan Studies, 34/2, Thessaloniki, 271-299.
1993, B. Kondis/K. Kentrotis/S. Sfetas/Y. D. Stefanides (eds.), Resurgent Irredentism: Documents on Skopje "Macedonian" nationalist aspirations (1934-1992), Institute for Balkan Studies (251), Thessaloniki 1993, 68 p.
1991, Militaerische Manoever im Mittelmeer. Zur voelkerrechtlichen und politischen Problematik zwischen Kuestenstaaten und Grossmaechten sowie Kuestenstaaten untereinander, Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft (Universitaetsschriften, Reihe Politik 24), Baden Baden 1991, 279 p.

MEMBERSHIPS

Member of the Hellenic Political Science Association (Athens, Greece)

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 16.09.2005

Nicholas and Natasha Aroney (Anastasopoulos)

This photograph appears in the preface of Peter Vanges' Kythera - A History. Many thanks to Peter and the Kytherian Association of Australia for permission to reproduce it here.


Nicholas Anthony Aroney (Anastasopoulos) was born in Aroniathika, Kythera, on 14th February 1899. An only child, his mother died very early in his life; his father was far away in America. For some years Nick was in the care of his grandmother in Kythera; but it was a life of poverty. In 1914, at just fifteen years of age, he boarded a German ship bound for Australia. War intervened and they were to go no further than Batavia in Java. Nick was forced to find another ship to take him to Sydney. The long and tortuous trip was to end in 1914 in the small country town of Warren in New South Wales where he took up employment working for an uncle. Times were difficult; wages were very low, but through hard work and frugality, Nick was able to accumulate some capital. In 1919, he bought, together with his first cousin Nicholas Aroney (Papadominakos), the "New York Cafe" in the town of Nowra, 161 kilometres south of Sydney. Years later, in 1936, they were to move to Wollongong, 80 kilometres further north, as proprietors of the "Spot Cafe". This, in turn, was sold in 1940 and Nick Aroney moved to Sydney where for some years during the war he was employed in the famous "Hotel Australia". He became the senior partner in a number of businesses in Sydney, notably the "Coronet Restaurant", the "Chicken Grill", and "St James Milk Bar"; he acquired as well substantial real estate interests.

Somewhat late in life, in 1962, Nick married Natasha, a lady of beauty, style and culture who had grown up in Vienna. Together they ran a small clothing manufacturing enterprise. It was a very happy marriage. They built a fine home in the prestigious suburb of Pymble and they made several trips to Greece, visiting on each occasion the beloved island of his childhood. Nick Aroney died in Sydney in 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.

Nicholas Aroney left behind a trust fund, which since his death has funded dozens of important projects related to Kythera and Greece. Without his generous legacy this website would not have been possible..

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 16.09.2005

Nicholas Anthony Aroney (Anastasopoulos)

This photograph appears in the preface of Peter Vanges' Kythera - A History. Many thanks to Peter and the Kytherian Association of Australia for permission to reproduce it here.


Nicholas Anthony Aroney (Anastasopoulos) was born in Aroniathika, Kythera, on 14th February 1899. An only child, his mother died very early in his life; his father was far away in America. For some years Nick was in the care of his grandmother in Kythera; but it was a life of poverty. In 1914, at just fifteen years of age, he boarded a German ship bound for Australia. War intervened and they were to go no further than Batavia in Java. Nick was forced to find another ship to take him to Sydney. The long and tortuous trip was to end in 1914 in the small country town of Warren in New South Wales where he took up employment working for an uncle. Times were difficult; wages were very low, but through hard work and frugality, Nick was able to accumulate some capital. In 1919, he bought, together with his first cousin Nicholas Aroney (Papadominakos), the "New York Cafe" in the town of Nowra, 161 kilometres south of Sydney. Years later, in 1936, they were to move to Wollongong, 80 kilometres further north, as proprietors of the "Spot Cafe". This, in turn, was sold in 1940 and Nick Aroney moved to Sydney where for some years during the war he was employed in the famous "Hotel Australia". He became the senior partner in a number of businesses in Sydney, notably the "Coronet Restaurant", the "Chicken Grill", and "St James Milk Bar"; he acquired as well substantial real estate interests.

Somewhat late in life, in 1962, Nick married Natasha, a lady of beauty, style and culture who had grown up in Vienna. Together they ran a small clothing manufacturing enterprise. It was a very happy marriage. They built a fine home in the prestigious suburb of Pymble and they made several trips to Greece, visiting on each occasion the beloved island of his childhood. Nick Aroney died in Sydney in 1986 at the age of eighty-seven.

Nicholas Aroney left behind a trust fund, which since his death has funded dozens of important projects related to Kythera and Greece. Without his generous legacy this website would not have been possible.

History > Photography

submitted by Association Of Kytherian University Professors on 15.09.2005

Professor Vasilios Leftheris

Vasilios Leftheris was born in Livadi Kythera, attended the elementary school in Livadi and Gymnasion in Chora.

He obtained his bachelor from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, a Masters from the University of Birmingham, England, another Masters from the University of Brooklyn in New York, USA and his PhD from Princeton University in New Jersey, USA.

He has participated in the Lunar Space program and the Fusion project.

Today he works in the rehabilitation of old buildings, their historical significance and their reconstruction. He has applied his knowledge of applied mechanics and strength of materials in teaching and understanding earthquake engineering.

He has also taught ‘Total Quality Management’.

He is Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, a Fellow of the Wessex Institute of Technology in England, a Member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and a
Member of the Professional Engineers Association of Greece.

He is currently the President of the The Association of Kytherian University Professors.

The Association of Kytherian University Professors has twenty-seven registered members. Its purpose is to promote research and analyses, at the highest academic level in all subjects pertaining to the island of Kythera and to provide a bridge of understanding and assistance to the ever changing social, technological, medical and other disciplines of the academic world.

History > Photography

submitted by Society of Kytherian Studies on 15.09.2005

Professor George Leontsinis

George N. Leontsinis is currently Professor of Modern Greek History and of the Teaching of History at the University of Athens, Greece.

He graduated from the School of Philosophy of the University of Athens (Department of History and Archaeology, and Department of Classics). He completed his postgraduate studies in England at the University of East Anglia, School of European History, with a grant from the Greek State Scholarship Foundation. He engaged in postdoctoral research (1987-1988) at the University of London, Holloway and Bedford New College, Department of History, as a Visiting Scholar.

From 1982 to 1995 he was School Inspector in Secondary Education for the philological and historical lessons.

He was Assistant Professor in the History Department of the Ionian University in Corfu, Greece during the academic years 1985/86–1989/90 where he taught a course in ‘Western European Sovereignties in Greece’.

In 1989 he was appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Education of the University of Athens where he taught courses on ‘Modern Greek History’ and on ‘History and its Teaching’.

In 1992 he was promoted to Associate Professor of Modern Greek History in the same Department. In 1997 he became a Full Professor (Chair of Modern Greek History and of the Teaching of History) in the same Department.

During the academic years 1989/90-1997/98 he was Visiting Professor at the University of Thessaly (Department of Education) where he taught ‘Modern Greek History’ and the ‘Teaching of History’. He is a member of the General Assembly of the Department of Selective Management of Human Resources and Administration of the University of Athens where he teaches the course ‘History of Modern Greece’. In the Marasleion Academy of the Department of Education of the University of Athens he also teaches the courses ‘History and its Teaching’, ‘Practical Exercises of the Teaching of History’ and ‘Modern Greek and European History’. He has been Director of the 3rd Athens Regional Centre of Further Education from 1996 to 2003.

In 1999 he was elected Councilor of the Municipality of Kythera (which was created in 1999 by the ‘Capodistria Bill’ for the reform of Local Government), and has been re-elected in 2002. Since 1999, he is responsible for education, culture and Kytherian Diaspora. He has currently been appointed Vice-Mayor of Kythera, responsible for Culture and Education.

He has published books and articles, and has taken part in conferences and seminars both at home and abroad. His doctoral dissertation was entitled The Island of Kythera: A Social History, 1700-1863, published by the ‘Saripolos Library Publications’ of the University of Athens (1987, reprinted 2000).

He is also the author of
(1) Studies in Heptanesian Social History (Athens 20055),
(2) Studies in Modern Greek History and Education (Athens 20045),
(3) Studies in Modern Greek History (Athens 20042),
(4) Teaching of History: Local History and Environmental Education (Athens 1996),
(5) History, the Environment and their Teaching (Athens 1999),
(6) Teaching of Local History (Athens 2000),
(7) Experimental Programme for the Teaching of Local History in Primary Education (Ministry of National Education, Institute of Education, Athens 2000),
(8) Theoretical and Methodological Questions of the Teaching of History and the Environment (Athens 2003),
(9) Greek Diaspora and School History (Athens 2005).

History > Photography

submitted by Eleni Malanos on 05.09.2005

Constantine Malanos

Constantine Malanos

History > Photography

submitted by Eva-Marie Prineas on 30.08.2005

Roger House, Stanmore

This compact Federation semi needed some well-considered rearranging to accommodate more natural light and space. Central to the new home is a glass-door-enclosed lightwell, or mini courtyard, that floods the kitchen and adjoining living room with light, while acting as a natural divider between the two rooms.
Photography: Brett Boardman

See:

http://www.architectprineas.com.au/

And:

http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=97-154&did=8043

History > Photography

submitted by George Poulos on 28.08.2005

Pappa Vangelli and wife.

Pappa VAngelli and wife.

History > Photography

submitted by James Gavriles on 24.08.2005

Hellenic Minister of National Defense, Spilios P. Spiliotopoulos

Hellenic Minister of National Defense, Spilios P. Spiliotopoulos,

Unveiling the Monument

To read a detailed history of the monument's creation, and the military history that led to it, go to
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=5-48&did=7988

History > Photography

submitted by James Gavriles on 24.08.2005

Andy in front of the monument

Andy Saffas standing in front of the monument and his sculpture in Athens

To read a detailed history of the monument's creation, and the military history that led to it, go to
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=5-48&did=7988

History > Photography

submitted by James Gavriles on 24.08.2005

Greek Operational Group Soldier Monument

January 2003:
The sculptor and four of the surviving members of the Greek-American Operational Group, in the sculptor's studio.
L to R: Sculptor Andrew G. Saffas (seated), Andrew S. Mousalimas, Alex P. Phillips, Nicholas H. Cominos, and Angelo N. Lygizos

To read a detailed history of the monument's creation, and the military history that led to it, go to
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=5-48&did=7988

History > Photography

submitted by Neos Kosmos, Melbourne on 21.08.2005

Professor Tamis with his new book 'The Greeks in Australia.'

La Trobe University's Bundoora Campus. Melbourne. Australia.

An excellent centre for Hellenism

By Giorgios Hatzimanolis


Nestled in the tranquil surroundings of La Trobe University's Bundoora Campus, The National Centre for Hellenic Studies and Research offers an ideal environment for those interested in learning more about the many facets of Hellenism. The Director of the Centre, Professor Anastasios Tamis, recently invited members of Neos Kosmos staff on a guided tour of the Centre. Realising I knew very little about the Centre, which is regarded as the largest research centre for Hellenic Studies outside of Greece, I decided to make the drive to Bundoora.

The two-hour tour by Professor Tamis and his staff, who made every effort to explain the many departments of the Centre, offered an insight into its daily operations, but also gave me a better understanding of the Centre's significance to Melbourne's vibrant Greek community.

The Centre's most impressive attribute is undoubtedly its amazing archive of historical material, including photographs, newspapers and videos, which document the history of Australia's Greeks. The size and volume of the archive is extraordinary and a must see.

Armed with a digital camera and a Dictaphone I photographed and recorded my tour, including these comments by Professor Tamis about the Centre.

What is the National Centre for Hellenic Studies and Research, La Trobe University?

The NCHSR, La Trobe University, was established in 1997 as a result of a La Trobe University Council decision, the generosity of Dr. Zissis Dardalis and the vision and support of the University's Vice Chancellor and President, Professor Michael John Osborne. The Centre is also known as EKEME, which is its acronym for 'Ethniko Kentro Ellinikon Meleton kai Erevnas.'

Since its establishment the NCHSR has arguably become the largest research and cultural Centre of Hellenism outside Greece, with both a national and international reputation. Its staff comprising academics, researchers, computer analysts, administrators and postgraduate students are joined by a number of renowned scholars and research fellows around the globe.

Why was it established?

The NCHSR was established to promote the Hellenic culture, history and civilisation to Australians of Hellenic descent, as well as to mainstream Australian society. Its objectives coincide with its philosophy and belief that the study, research and maintenance of Hellenism in the Diaspora, and the development of strong cultural and academic links between the Hellenic metropolis and Australasia can enrich life in this country as well as enhance the cultural, social and economic contribution of Australians of Greek heritage towards the societies in which they reside.

The NCHSR's mission is to achieve international recognition as a unique Centre poised to contribute to the academic study, preservation and dissemination of Hellenism. The objectives deriving from the above may be summarised as follows:

· Maintain and develop the Greek language, culture and the Hellenic civilisation.

· Study and promote the history of Greek expatriation in the Diaspora.

· Establish a leading international resource centre on issues of Hellenism for those living outside Greece.

· Provide the facilities for retrieving original archival documents and photographs depicting the settlement of Greeks around the globe.

· Become an internationally recognised centre for quality research, and

· Provide a strong link between the Greek communities of Australia, La Trobe University and Australian society at large.

Are you satisfied with its progress?

Given the fact that we commenced our operations from ground level I would have to say yes, I am very satisfied. Currently it is the only university institution in the Greek Diaspora with an Institute for Cypriot Studies and Research, an Institute for Macedonian Studies and an Institute for Asia Minor and Pontic Studies. I am also satisfied because the University is demonstrating a keen and sincere interest and contributes substantially towards its welfare and existence.

During the last seven years we brought over 30 distinguished scholars and academics from all over the world, we managed to publish 18 publications on the Greek language, culture and the history of Greek migration, we managed to publish nine books written by Greek Australian poets and prose writers, we held over ten seminars, one international Conference and organised over 45 lectures, inviting prominent scholars to contribute.

Furthermore, we managed to digitalise over 250,000 documents of the Australian Greek migration and settlement, we collaborated closely with the Greek Communities of Sydney, Canberra, Western Australia, Darwin, over 50 Greek organisations classifying, documenting and indexing their archives. We organised three Australia-wide student competitions on the Aegean, Cypriot and Macedonian civilisation attracting a total of 11,000 students from over 800 Australian schools of whom 80% were of non-Greek-background. We trained over 50 Greek language students with special seminars organised at the Centre and in collaboration with the Victorian Government we trained over 60 young Greek Australian to find employment.

Currently we collaborate with the Universities of Crete, Athens, Thessaloniki, Wursburg, Concordia, with the National Centre of research in Greece, the Centre for Ecumenical Hellenism, the Institution Maria Tsakos in Uruguay, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Greece and the Greek Parliament. In addition we are the 'balcony' of many Greek institutions to present artists from Greece, their work and their lectures. In this capacity, we presented in Australia the Aegean Exhibition with the Greek Ministry of the Aegean, publishing two books - one for Aegean Immigration and Settlement in Australia and one about the Cypriot civilisation.

Will the Centre remain viable in the future?

This is our ultimate goal. This will depend on the generosity of the Greek Australian business community and the support of the Greek and Cypriot Governments. The Australian Government and La Trobe University participated generously contributing a 99-year lease, with the possibility for another 99 years for six buildings and the obligation to cover all maintenance expenses of over 500,000 annually. The operating costs of the NCHSR (currently at over $800,000) will remain to be covered by the Greek Australian community, the Greek and Cypriot Governments as well as services and books published by this Centre. During the last eight years we managed to raise the funds and sustain this Centre. I anticipate that the current support that we enjoy will continue.

Currently the EKEME is the most-well known Centre in Greece as well as in Australia. We have a responsibility towards our future generations as well as our heritage to maintain the EKEME, in an era where most of our Greek organisations are eradicated in the integration process.

Has the NCHSR received support and recognition from the Greek Community and Greek and Federal Governments?

As it was already outlined this Centre has received the generous support of the Greek business community. Furthermore there are over 600 life members and members joining the Societies of Friends for Hellenic Studies and Research in all states. This proves the substantial support that this Centre is deriving from our vital association with the Greek community. The Greek Government has supported many of our research projects and supported all student competitions. Greek Ministries have also awarded grants in support of our operation and research.

Can you detail the Centre's upcoming projects?

There are many ongoing projects. Currently we are working on 28 research projects with institutions from Greece and the rest of Europe, the USA and Latin America. We anticipate to publish extensively (our publication on the Greeks in Latin America will be presented in Greece in November), we organise the National Students' Competition on Macedonia with the code name 'Alexander the Great,' we bring prominent scholars, including Professor Petrohilos (Latin), Professor Leontsinis (History), Professor Glykofridis (Philosophy), Professor Kostopoulou (Economics), Professor Xatziathanasiou (Engineering), we maintain the co-ordination of the 'Programa Paideia Omogenon' for Oceania in collaboration with the University of Crete, we continue with our stream of lectures and seminars for the whole of 2005, we organise together with the University of Athens the International Conference in Kythera about the Kytherians, we participate with the University of Wyrzburg on the Movement of Philhellenes, we organise in January 2006 the Exhibition of the Greeks in Australia in Athens with the 'Oikoumenikos Ellinismos,' we collaborate with the Greek Parliament in February regarding another Exhibition on the Greeks in Australia, while we actively participate in 11 conferences with our academics and researchers. One of the most consistent contributions of this Centre is the digitalisation of the Greek Immigration and Settlement Archives.

History > Photography

submitted by Dean Coroneos on 19.08.2005

Hunter Valley Flood Map.

Rainfall isohyets (in mm) for the “Maitland flood” event of February 1955.


Floods Occurred over a large area of central New South Wales, devastating many Kytherian families and businesses.

What was your experience of the 1955 floods?


Hunter Valley, February 1955

The Hunter Valley floods of late February 1955 have, in many people’s minds, come to symbolise flooding in Australia, helped by the dramatic images from the movie Newsfront.

Heavy rain had fallen over much of eastern Australia from October 1954 when, on 23 February 1955, an intensifying monsoon depression moved south from Queensland. Torrential rain developed, particularly over the area of New South Wales from Warren to Cassilis. Rainfall totals exceeded 250mm in 24 hours between Nevertire and Dunedoo, a phenomenal amount for this area. Heavy rains then moved east across the Liverpool Ranges and down the Hunter Valley. With such intense rain falling on already saturated ground the Hunter, along with several westward-flowing rivers, soon reached unprecedented levels.

At Maitland, on the banks of the Hunter, the river surged nearly a metre higher than the previous record this century, set three years earlier. More than 5,000 homes were flooded - in some cases submerged - by anything up to five metres of muddy water. About 15,000 people were evacuated, many plucked from rooftops by boat or helicopter. The floodwaters destroyed 31 homes in Maitland, but more than 100 more were so badly damaged that they had to be demolished. Fourteen lives were lost, including five due to electrocution during rescue operations. At Singleton another 1600 homes were flooded.

West of the Divide, the Macquarie River exceeded its previous record height by 1.6 metres at Dubbo, where five houses were destroyed and 4000 residents evacuated. More than a metre of turgid, muddy water covered the main street. It was a similar story at Narromine, Warren, Trangie and other towns in the Macquarie Valley. The Castlereagh also reached a record height, with waist-deep water swirling through the shopping centre at Gilgandra, wrecking a third of the buildings. A hole torn in the main street was later found to contain two large semi-trailers. Twenty-four homes were totally destroyed and 350 were badly damaged.

The Namoi and Gwydir valleys were devastated. Narrabri was completely isolated; water up to three metres deep covered some streets. About 1000 homes at Narrabri, and nearly as many at Moree, suffered water damage.

As a whole, the flooding took the lives of 25 people. Some 2,000 cattle and many thousands of head of other livestock were drowned. The damage to bridges, roads, railways and telephone lines took months to repair.

The Hunter Valley event was but one - albeit the most spectacular - of many heavy rain episodes over eastern Australia between late 1954 and the end of 1956, a period dominated by La Niña conditions. The year 1956 was remarkable in that repeated flooding occurred throughout the vast Murray-Darling river system throughout the first half of the year.

Australian Government.
Department of Meteorology


http://www.bom.gov.au/lam/climate/levelthree/c20thc/flood5.htm