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History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Regent Café, Lismore, 1938

L to R: Harry John or Harry Nick Crethar, Spiro Tsicalas, Nick Jim Crethar, Jean Brown, Ruby Green, Nellie Mules, Harry Jim Crethar

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Sargent’s Markets, Lismore, Christmas 1965

L to R: Alex Coronakes, Mark Terakes, Sylvia Terakes (John’s wife), Maria Sourry (nee Terakes), John Terakes, Theo George Poulos, Katina Terakes (nee Sargent)

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Appo’s Café, Keen Street, Lismore, 1952

Steve Apogremiotis and daughter Irene. Irene married Con Goodelis 1956 and together they ran the Samios Café at Kyogle until moving to Brisbane in 1961.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Crethar’s Wonder Bar, Lismore, 1960

Eric Crethar behind bar on left

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Coronakes Wonder Bar 1950

L to R Gwen Griffin, Unknown, June Sharp, Barbara Hill, Francis Licklis

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Lismore Fruit Exchange 1937

Paul Coronakes in suit

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Coronakes Café, Woodlark Street, Lismore, 1932

Paul Coronakes behind counter.
Pavlos Spyro Koronakis, born 1890, Rachades, Corfu, landed in 1913 and came straight to the Northern Rivers, probably accompanying his fellow Corfiot, Denis George Kardamis. Paul seems to have spent most of his time around Murwillumbah until establishing the Canberra Café in Lismore in 1919 and the Lismore Fruit Exchange in 1923. In 1924 he moved next door, subsequently dividing the shop to separately house the fruit business and a posh café. He moved to Keen Street in 1936 to deal exclusively in fruit.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Monterey Café, Lismore, 1939

L to R: Matina Crethary, Peter Crethary, Grace Collins
Peter, born 1895 Karavas, the son of Nick and Stamatina (nee Kypriotis), is believed to have been educated in Smyrna before signing up with the Greek army in 1914, serving through till the end of the war and rising to the rank of Sergeant. After the war he joined his mother’s well-established Kypriotis family in Egypt where he spent 4yrs, becoming a cotton merchant based in Khartoum, before coming on to Australia in 1922 with his probable cousin Harry Demetrios Crethar. They went straight to Glen Innes where Harry worked for George Vanges and Peter with his cousin Peter Angelo Crithary. In 1926, shortly after acquiring his own café, the Popular, Peter married Anna John Coroneo. In 1929 they sold up and settled permanently in Lismore.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Mecca Café, Lismore, 1960

By this time the Mecca had supplanted the Greeks to become the most modern, and arguably the most popular, café in Lismore, retaining a leading position to this day.

History > Photography

submitted by Association Of Kytherian University Professors on 24.10.2005

Emmanuel G Cassimatis, M.D.

Dr. Cassimatis is Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and Professor of Psychiatry, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine (SOM), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU). His responsibilities include oversight of the SOM’s clinical affiliations and of the University’s international programs. From 1995 to 2000, he was additionally the senior project officer for the design, construction and staffing of the University’s National Capital Area Medical Simulation Center, which was dedicated in April 2000.

Dr. Cassimatis received his B.A. from the University of Chicago and his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. After completing a pediatric internship at Yale New Haven Hospital, he obtained his psychiatric residency training at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center (MMHC). In 1975, Dr. Cassimatis entered active duty at Ft. Lee, Virginia, where he served for one year before being transferred to Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC). He remained at WRAMC for 10 years, serving as Assistant Chief of the Inpatient Psychiatry Service, Director of Psychiatric Education and Training, and Chief of the Outpatient Psychiatry Service. While at WRAMC, he also completed his psychoanalytic training at the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute. Subsequent military assignments included two European tours (Chief, Department of Psychiatry, U. S. Hospital, Berlin; and Deputy Commander for Clinical Services, Frankfurt Army Regional Medical Center); and three consecutive positions in the Office of the Army Surgeon General (Psychiatry Consultant; Chief, Graduate Medical Education Branch; and Chief, Medical Education Division). Dr. Cassimatis last assignment, in 1995, was to USU, where he remained until his retirement from active duty on 1 February 2001. Following a national search, he was selected for his present position at USU in August 2001.

Dr. Cassimatis has served on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) since 1999, and is presently the ACGME Board Chair. He is also a member and Past Chair of the Council on Medical Education (CME) of the American Medical Association (AMA), the AMA Specialty and Service Society, the AMA Section Council on Federal and Military Medicine, and the Liaison Committee on Specialty Boards (ABMS/AMA). In the AMA, he additionally serves on the Leadership Group on the AMA’s “Initiative to Transform Medical Education;” as Chair of AMA CME’ s Undergraduate Medical Education Subcommittee; and as a Delegate to the AMA House from the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States (AMSUS), where he is also a member of the Board of Managers. A Diplomate of the National Board of Medical Examiners and the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Dr. Cassimatis is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a Fellow of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, a Life Member of AMSUS, and a member of the Society of Medical Consultants to the Armed Forces and of the Academy of Medicine of Washington, DC. His military awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Legion of Merit (1st Oak Leaf Cluster), the Order of Military Medical Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal (1st OLC), the Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal. He has also been awarded the USU Distinguished Service Medal; the Surgeon General’s “A” suffix for outstanding qualifications in the field of Psychiatry; and the Year 2000 “Young at Heart” Award from the AMA’s Young Physician Section, “in recognition of invaluable support and guidance to the Section and young physicians.” In 2003 he was selected PGY-3 “Teacher of the Year” by the National Capital Consortium Psychiatry residents; and in 2004 was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha, and awarded the Nancy C. A. Roeske Certificate of Recognition for Excellence in Medical Student Education by the American Psychiatric Association.

Recent Publications:

Ritchie, E. C., Cassimatis, E., Emanuel, R., Milliken, C., Gray, S. H., "The Contributions of Kenneth Leslie Artiss, M.D. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, 31(4): 663-673, 2003

Cassimatis, E.G.: Terrorism, our World and our Way-of-Life, Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 30(4), 2002

Cassimatis, E. G.: Fundamental Concerns in the Practice of Psychiatry. In Nostos (a Publication of the Kytherian University Professors’ Association), Vol. 1, Athens, 2002 (in Greek)

Cassimatis, E.G.: On the Frame of Reference in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 29(4), 2001

Cassimatis, E.G.: Reality, Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 28(4), 2000

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 24.10.2005

Molesworth Street, Lismore, 1930

Jones’ Tea Rooms was the original home of the Queen City Refreshment Rooms, opened by Alderman John I. Smith in 1896 and passed to Walter Gray in 1924. Gray passed it to Fred and Grace Jones 18mths later and moved further north on Molesworth to take over the MG Refreshment Rooms and create the Elite Cafe, which he passed to the Vlismas Bros in 1929.
The Tudor was initially an ex saddler’s shop, converted into a café in 1927 by Paul Coronakes who passed it to the Jones’ in 1933 after their shop was absorbed in the construction of Penny’s Department Store.
(1) was the Olympia Café until becoming home to Lang’s Shoe Shop in 1929, but Theo Fardouly and family continued to live upstairs for some time.
(2) is Crethar’s Sundae Shop, established by Angelo Crethar in 1926 upon taking over the Tea Room business of Sackett & Howard, who had in turn taken over from John Zervothakis in 1908. In 1935 Angelo added a second storey and absorbed portion of the shop next door.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 24.10.2005

Crethar’s Sundae Shop, Lismore, 1932

In 1935 Angelo Crethar acquired the freehold and remodeled the place, taking portion of the shop next door to make room for a series of two-seater cubicles down the left hand side. He also added a second storey, which became home to a very ritzy dining room until the installation of air conditioning in 1939, when the main dining side of the business reverted to the rear of the ground floor.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 24.10.2005

Star Court Kiosk, Lismore, 1941

Anargyros (Eric) Victor Crethar behind counter
The Star Court was opened by the partnership of Angelo Crethar and Greg Londy (Leondarakis) in 1930, but in about 1940 Greg walked out to establish a café in Casino, leaving Angelo to install various managers until he sold the place to Peter Crethary in 1942. Eric landed in 1936 and worked in his brother’s various enterprises, but mainly at the ‘Air Conditioned’.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 24.10.2005

Tudor Cafe, Lismore, 1948

Peter Contojohn (Kountogiannis) in front of bar and daughter Daisy leading large staff contingent.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 24.10.2005

Haralambos Anargyros Kritharis

Transitional phase on the way to morphing into Harry Eric Crethar
at Greek National Day festivities, Bexhill near Lismore, in 1955.
Harry and his mother, Panayiota (nee Georgiou), landed 1947 to join his father Eric who had came in 1936.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 24.10.2005

Capital Cafe, Lismore, 1937

Spiro Angelo Dendrinos centre and Peter Dionysos Manias behind till
The Capital was created by the Ithacan Vlismas Bros in 1929 upon acquiring Walter Gray’s Elite Cafe and giving the place a £1,000 makeover to indisputably become Lismore’s poshest restaurant. They went banana growing in 1937, passing the place to Dendrinos & Manias, a partnership of fellow Ithacans, who spent another £3,500 to make the place the classiest noshery on the north coast of NSW. As if that wasn’t enough, 2yrs later they did it all over again, installing a ginormous new soda fountain/milkshake bar amongst other mod cons. They weren’t about to be sidelined by the major overhauls at nearby Crethars and the Tudor.

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 15.10.2005

Con Malanos.

With an associate, Greek Orthodox clergy and Archbishop, and the Australian federal Minister for Ageing.

Left to right:

Rev Fr Constantine,

Jack Passaris,

His Grace Bishop Seraphim,

Con Malanos,

Hon Julie Bishop MP, Minister for Ageing.

His Eminence Archbishop Stylianos.

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ministers/publishing.nsf/Content/MediaReleases-3~jbphotogallery200308

History > Photography

submitted by Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) on 14.10.2005

Notaras blackbutt timber. Beautifying Australian homes.

Blackbutt, or Eucalyptus pilularis, has been one of the mainstays of the New South Wales timber industry for more than a century. Howard Spencer talks to north coast sawmillers Spiro and Brinos Notaras about the quality and various uses of this native timber.

Growing up to a height of 45 metres with a diameter of 1.2 metres, blackbutt gets its common name from the bark around the base, which changes to a smooth surface towards the upper trunk and limbs.

Blackbutt is plentiful in State forests, occurring on various soils but making better progress on light, deep loams. It is one of the most common coastal trees and reproduces readily from natural seeding. Blackbutt contributes around 22 per cent of the State's timber production, well ahead of the next two major native forest timbers, cypress pine and spotted gum, which each deliver about 14 per cent. Blackbutt is also one of the major species being planted in State Forests' hardwood plantation program.

Timber from blackbutt has been used for a wide variety of purposes, including general joinery, feature flooring, veneers, sleepers, poles and girders. It is widely used in bridge building but is equally at home in all facets of home-building.

And the sawmillers just love it.

According to veteran Grafton millers, Spiro and Brinos Notaras of J. Notaras & Sons, blackbutt lays flatter than spotted gum, another major species, and there is not as much tension in the wood as either spotted gum or ironbark.

"We've sawn blackbutt since we started the mill in 1952," says Spiro.

"But since State Forests introduced log merchandising we have seen a lot more of it. Now it is nearly 15 per cent of our business."

The Notaras blackbutt comes from State forests like Clouds Creek, Wild Cattle Creek and elsewhere in the Dorrigo area. It is milled within a week or two of harvest, where it is sawn to board dimension, stripped for air drying for around two months, then spends three weeks in the kiln drying to nine or 10 per cent moisture level. After a short equalisation in the shed, its final process is steam reconditioning.

"We are continually testing and learning," Spiro said.

"The blackbutt looks good, and has more of an even colour than other species. There can be a bit of variation in native regrowth blackbutt, while plantation blackbutt is lighter."

The Notaras mill has just completed a trial operation with State Forests where blackbutt logs were computer-tracked through the harvest and milling process to the finished board. The results will assist in determining how best to grow and treat blackbutt from seedling to sale in the future.

Notaras blackbutt goes into products as diverse as basketball courts, because of its superior fire rating against other timbers, and into household and commercial flooring, parquetry, decking and furniture.

Other products from this universal timber end up in mixed hardwood lots sold to New Zealand, and in mixed hardwood floors that are a feature of many Queenslander style homes north of the border.

With valuable applications like these, blackbutt will continue to be an important timber species for many years to come.

Howard Spencer
Public Affairs, Coffs Harbour


NSW Department of Primary Industries site:

http://www.forest.nsw.gov.au/bush/aug01/stories/23.asp

History > Photography

submitted by Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) on 14.10.2005

Notaras timber. This batch of blackbutt was tracked by computer from the harvest to the milled board.

Now they are ready for market.

Blackbutt, or Eucalyptus pilularis, has been one of the mainstays of the New South Wales timber industry for more than a century. Howard Spencer talks to north coast sawmillers Spiro and Brinos Notaras about the quality and various uses of this native timber.

Growing up to a height of 45 metres with a diameter of 1.2 metres, blackbutt gets its common name from the bark around the base, which changes to a smooth surface towards the upper trunk and limbs.

Blackbutt is plentiful in State forests, occurring on various soils but making better progress on light, deep loams. It is one of the most common coastal trees and reproduces readily from natural seeding. Blackbutt contributes around 22 per cent of the State's timber production, well ahead of the next two major native forest timbers, cypress pine and spotted gum, which each deliver about 14 per cent. Blackbutt is also one of the major species being planted in State Forests' hardwood plantation program.

Timber from blackbutt has been used for a wide variety of purposes, including general joinery, feature flooring, veneers, sleepers, poles and girders. It is widely used in bridge building but is equally at home in all facets of home-building.

And the sawmillers just love it.

According to veteran Grafton millers, Spiro and Brinos Notaras of J. Notaras & Sons, blackbutt lays flatter than spotted gum, another major species, and there is not as much tension in the wood as either spotted gum or ironbark.

"We've sawn blackbutt since we started the mill in 1952," says Spiro.

"But since State Forests introduced log merchandising we have seen a lot more of it. Now it is nearly 15 per cent of our business."

The Notaras blackbutt comes from State forests like Clouds Creek, Wild Cattle Creek and elsewhere in the Dorrigo area. It is milled within a week or two of harvest, where it is sawn to board dimension, stripped for air drying for around two months, then spends three weeks in the kiln drying to nine or 10 per cent moisture level. After a short equalisation in the shed, its final process is steam reconditioning.

"We are continually testing and learning," Spiro said.

"The blackbutt looks good, and has more of an even colour than other species. There can be a bit of variation in native regrowth blackbutt, while plantation blackbutt is lighter."

The Notaras mill has just completed a trial operation with State Forests where blackbutt logs were computer-tracked through the harvest and milling process to the finished board. The results will assist in determining how best to grow and treat blackbutt from seedling to sale in the future.

Notaras blackbutt goes into products as diverse as basketball courts, because of its superior fire rating against other timbers, and into household and commercial flooring, parquetry, decking and furniture.

Other products from this universal timber end up in mixed hardwood lots sold to New Zealand, and in mixed hardwood floors that are a feature of many Queenslander style homes north of the border.

With valuable applications like these, blackbutt will continue to be an important timber species for many years to come.

Howard Spencer
Public Affairs, Coffs Harbour


NSW Department of Primary Industries site:

http://www.forest.nsw.gov.au/bush/aug01/stories/23.asp

History > Photography

submitted by Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) on 14.10.2005

Notaras saw takes a side flitch out of a blackbutt log.

Blackbutt, or Eucalyptus pilularis, has been one of the mainstays of the New South Wales timber industry for more than a century. Howard Spencer talks to north coast sawmillers Spiro and Brinos Notaras about the quality and various uses of this native timber.

Growing up to a height of 45 metres with a diameter of 1.2 metres, blackbutt gets its common name from the bark around the base, which changes to a smooth surface towards the upper trunk and limbs.

Blackbutt is plentiful in State forests, occurring on various soils but making better progress on light, deep loams. It is one of the most common coastal trees and reproduces readily from natural seeding. Blackbutt contributes around 22 per cent of the State's timber production, well ahead of the next two major native forest timbers, cypress pine and spotted gum, which each deliver about 14 per cent. Blackbutt is also one of the major species being planted in State Forests' hardwood plantation program.

Timber from blackbutt has been used for a wide variety of purposes, including general joinery, feature flooring, veneers, sleepers, poles and girders. It is widely used in bridge building but is equally at home in all facets of home-building.

And the sawmillers just love it.

According to veteran Grafton millers, Spiro and Brinos Notaras of J. Notaras & Sons, blackbutt lays flatter than spotted gum, another major species, and there is not as much tension in the wood as either spotted gum or ironbark.

"We've sawn blackbutt since we started the mill in 1952," says Spiro.

"But since State Forests introduced log merchandising we have seen a lot more of it. Now it is nearly 15 per cent of our business."

The Notaras blackbutt comes from State forests like Clouds Creek, Wild Cattle Creek and elsewhere in the Dorrigo area. It is milled within a week or two of harvest, where it is sawn to board dimension, stripped for air drying for around two months, then spends three weeks in the kiln drying to nine or 10 per cent moisture level. After a short equalisation in the shed, its final process is steam reconditioning.

"We are continually testing and learning," Spiro said.

"The blackbutt looks good, and has more of an even colour than other species. There can be a bit of variation in native regrowth blackbutt, while plantation blackbutt is lighter."

The Notaras mill has just completed a trial operation with State Forests where blackbutt logs were computer-tracked through the harvest and milling process to the finished board. The results will assist in determining how best to grow and treat blackbutt from seedling to sale in the future.

Notaras blackbutt goes into products as diverse as basketball courts, because of its superior fire rating against other timbers, and into household and commercial flooring, parquetry, decking and furniture.

Other products from this universal timber end up in mixed hardwood lots sold to New Zealand, and in mixed hardwood floors that are a feature of many Queenslander style homes north of the border.

With valuable applications like these, blackbutt will continue to be an important timber species for many years to come.

Howard Spencer
Public Affairs, Coffs Harbour


NSW Department of Primary Industries site:

http://www.forest.nsw.gov.au/bush/aug01/stories/23.asp