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History > Photography

submitted by Tony Panaretos on 19.11.2005

The Centre Spot Shop. Dubbo. NSW.

ZT

History > Photography

submitted by Gilgandra Weekly on 07.12.2006

Paul Kelly. Upper part of his headstone. Gilgandra Cemetery.

Gilgandra Weekly, Wednesday, 12th May, 1971, page 9.

[Paul Kelly (Yiannakellis) was a towering presence in the town of Gilgandra, NSW. He married Kytherian Chrysanthe Georgopoulos (Pronounced Yeoryopoulos, called Poulos) in 1939. His impact on Kytherians and Kytherian affairs was immense - Administrator.]

Mr. Paul Kelly passed away suddenly on Monday May 3 at the age of 61 years. [Notice was given in the Gilgandra Weekly of Wednesday 5th May, that his Obituary would appear in the Gilgandra Weekly the following week.]

Paul came to Australia in 1926 from from Mytilene,(Lesbos), and after two years in Sydney went to Bombala, where he was employed by the late Nicholas Condoleon and Mrs Condoleon for 12 years.

Following his marriage to Chrisyanthe Gorgopoulos he came to Gilgandra, thirty two years ago, where for a period of time he was in partnership with his wife and her brother, Emmanuel Gorgopoulos (deceased) in the newsagency and the ABC cafe.

The remainder of his life was spent in the Cafe except for a short period in 1960/1961 during which time, he and his family resided in Sydney.

Paul Kelly was a man who was respected and liked by all who knew him and this was shown by the number of people who attended his funeral which was held at the St. Ambrose Church of England on May 4.

Pall bearers were Messrs George Psaltis, Con Poulos, Theo Poulos, Harry Logus and Manuel and Nick Coroneos.

Although due to his business commitments he was unable to participate in many club activities, no organisation. either Church, sporting, charitable, or service, was ever turned away without help of some type.

Paul Kelly was a true Christian who helped those who needed it, but never once asked for any thanks.

Paul Kelly is survived by his wife Chrisyanthe, sons George and Theo, daughter Stella, son-in-law David Aird, and grandaughters, Kristina and Eyleena Aird.

One step-brother, Photis Kelly and his family of Kingsford, and a brother, Strati Kelly, predeceased him.

History > Photography

submitted by Athanasia Glycofrydi-Leontsini on 14.11.2005

Professor Athanasia Glycofrydi-Leontsini.

Professor of Modern European and Neohellenic Philosophy-Department of Philosophy, University of Athens, Greece

Home Address:

8, Valaniou Str.,
18536 Piraeus

Tel./Fax: (0030)210-4518279

Office: University of Athens, School of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy.

University Campus, Ilissia 15771

Tel.: (0030)210-7277538, Fax: (0030)210-7248979

e-mail contact: here

Studies:

BA (Hons) in Ancient and Modern Greek Literature and Philosophy, School of Philosophy, University of Athens (1969).
Scholarship from the Greek National Research Centre to do research attached to the Department of Philosophy, University of Athens (1970-73).

Scholarship from the Italian Ministry of Education for Studies in Italian Language and Culture (Universitΰ di Firenze per stranieri, 1972).

Postgraduate Studies in the School of European and Social Studies of the University of East Anglia under the supervision of Dr. E. Shaffer (1976-78).

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD in Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, University of Athens, 1986).

Visiting scholar in the University of London, University of Glasgow, Universitΰ degli Studi di Napoli “Orientale”.
Representative of the Greek Ministry of Education for the European Year of Languages (2000-2001) in the EC (Bruxelles).

Scholarship from the British Council for research in byzantine and post-byzantine culture and philosophy (London, 2004).

Research Interests

Modern European and Neo-hellenic Philosophy, Byzantine and post-Byzantine Literature and Philosophy, Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment, History of Ideas, Aesthetics, Moral and Political Philosophy.

Teaching

Undergraduate and Postgraduate courses on Modern and Contemporary Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art, History of Modern European and Modern Greek Philosophy, Philosophy of Mind, Ethics and Politics at the Department of Philosophy – School of Philosophy – University of Athens. She teaches Aesthetic Theories and Aesthetic Education at the Marasleio Academy of Primary Education of the University of Athens.

Research Activities

Member of several Greek, European and International Societies such as The British Society for the History of Philosophy, Hume Society, Reid Society, International History of Eighteenth Century Studies (ISECS), International Society for the Intellectual History, International Society for Aesthetics, International Society for the Study of European Ideas, Greek Society for Aesthetics, Greek Philosophical Society, Greek Society of Philosophical Studies, Greek Society for the Hellenic Enlightenment.

She has participated with papers in numerous Conferences and Congresses in Greece and abroad and has published widely in journals and collected volumes (in Greek, English and Italian).

Publications

She is the author of numerous articles and books in Greek, English and Italian.

Books:

She has authored in Greek:

1. The Epistemological Foundations of Thomas Reid’s Aesthetics, PhD Thesis (Athens, 1988)

2. Neohellenic Aesthetics and the European Enlightenment (Athens, 1989)

3. Neohellenic Philosophy: Persons and Problems (Athens, 1993)

4. Neohellenic Philosophy: Moral and Political Questions (Athens, 2001)

5. Systems of Fine Arts in Neohellenic Aesthetics (Athens, 2002)

6. Aesthetics and Art. Critical Reconsiderations (2005).

She has also annotated and edited critical editions of Modern Greek philosophical works from 14th century onwards, such as:

1. P. Vrailas-Armenis, Philosophical Works (4 vols., Athens, 1973, 1974, 1986, 2004)

2. D. Kydones, Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae in Greek, Corpus Philosophorum Graecorum Recentiorum (Athens, vol. 15).

She is jointed general editor of the Corpus Philosophorum Graecorum Recentiorum.
She edited: Kythera: Myth and Reality, 5 vols., 2003.

She has also published numerous articles in journals and Proceedinds of Conferences.

Distinctions-awards

Aroni’s award from Athens University for the book Systems of the Fine Arts in Neohellenic Aesthetics (2003).

At the Annual Ceremony of the Academy of Athens she received an Award for promotion of the research on Modern Greek Philosophy (2004).

History > Photography

submitted by O Kosmos on 06.11.2005

Professor Nikos Petrochilos in Melbourne's Central Square.

During his visit to Australia. This photograph was taken during his visit to Melbourne, Monday 24th October - Thursday 27th October, 2005.

Published in O Kosmos, Sydney, Australia, Thursday 3 November, 2005. p.25.

Kytherian Professor's visit to Australia an enormous success.


Professor Nikos Petrochilos, was invited to visit Australia by the Kytherian Association of Australia. The Association was aided by funds from the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust.

Nikos was born in Athens, of Kytherian heritage, and is Emeritus Professor of Latin Literature in the Philosophic School of the University of Thessaloniki. He graduated from the Philosophic School of the University of Athens in 1960 and obtained his PhD in 1973 from the University of London (Westfield College). His PhD dissertation was titled Roman Attitudes to the Greeks. Professor Petrochilos has translated several historical Latin texts into modern Greek (including works by Sallust, Suetonius, Seneca and Erasmus) and has written various works on the cultural relations between the ancient Greeks and Romans. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Crete, Athens and Cyprus. He is also a past President of the National Theatre of Greece. To read more about the life and achievements of Nikos Petrochilos, you are directed to http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=3-10&cid=21&did=7865&pageflip=1.

When the Greek and Classics departments of Universities on the east coast of Australia were advised that Nikos Petrochilos was available to lecture to them, they all clamoured to provide him with a venue, and time to perform these lectures.

Thus at Macquarie University, he lectured at the Museum of Ancient Cultures, on the "Romans the Greeks and the Sea." In Canberra, under the auspices of the Australian National University, on "Roman emulation to the Greek intellectual culture." At La Trobe University, Melbourne, under the auspices of the National Centre for Hellenic Studies, he endevoured to answer the questions, "Did the Ancient Romans know the Greek language? Did they use it?" All these lectures, and more, will be "posted" shortly on the www.kythera-family.net website. Nikos was also special guest at a luncheon held at the Classics Department of the University of Queensland, on Monday the 31st October. On Thursday 20th October, he proposed the Toast "...to the Classics", at the Classical Association (Sydney University) Annual Dinner. At all venues, he spoke to large audiences - far in excess of the numbers that ordinarily attend such functions.

He is lauded as one of the few Classics authorites in the world, who can readily "cross-over" between the Greek and the Roman world. He has translated numerous Roman classics into Greek. His grasp of the Latin language is extrordinary. When he was invited to attend the Vatican in recent years, he was one of very few persons in Rome who could speak fluently and conversationally in the Latin tongue.

Professor Petrochilos's visit, however, is a "janusian" one. What do we mean by "janusian"? Janus was one of the gods of ancient Rome. He was the god of gates and doorways, and was depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions. Analagously Professor Petrochilos's visit presents two faces. The first face is directed to the Classics. The second face is directed to his work as the President of the Society of Kytherian Studies.

The work of the Society of Kytherian Studies is extremely important to Kytherians everywhere. It would be no exaggeration to say, that with respect to the preservation of the Kytherian heritage, environment and ethos, the Society is the premier Kytherian organisation in the world. The superior work and achievements of the Society, however, are little known amongst Kytherian Australians. One of the main purposes of Nikos's visit was to impart knowledge to Australian Kytherians about the depth and breadth of the Society's work.

The Society of Kytherian Studies has published numerous books on Kytherian history, language, heritage and ethos, as well as various archival records from Church registers on Kythera. This includes the recently published large volume on "Kytherian Surnames", which is a very important book for all Kytherians endeavouring to research their geneaology and heritage. It is hoped that this text will soon be translated into English. Other works, such as the "Myths and Legends of Kythera", and the "Kytherian Lexicology" - take us very deep to the core of the Kytherian sense of identity. It would be a great achievement to translate many of the other texts published by the Society, into English as well. All of the Society's texts, have been made available for perusal by Kytherians, at all venues where Nikos has spoken in Australia.

The Society is also engaged in archaeological research and the preservation of Kytherian artefacts and monuments. You can read more about the history and achievements of the Society of Kytherian Studies at http://kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=135-137.

One of the results of Nikos's visit, was to help to draw the various Kytherian Heritage groups around the world, together. This has resulted in a proposal to create the Kytherian World Heritage Council. This Council will be convened in the near future.

The crowning event of the visit was the Parliamentary Luncheon (NSW Parliament House, Macquarie Street), held on 2nd November. It was attended by Ionannis Raptakis, the Consul-General Greece. The Archbishop of the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia, His Eminence, Archbishop Stylianos, was also been invited, to grace the meeting with his presence, but the timetables set out for these two eminent men could not be bought into conjunction.

During this function, a sum in the vicinity of $60,000, collected from various Kytherian organisations, companies, and individuals from around Australia, was gifted to Professor Nikos Petrochilos by the President of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Dr Victor Kepreotis.

This will ensure, that the superb work of the Society of Kytherian Studies, will continue into the future.

History > Photography

submitted by O Kosmos on 06.11.2005

Professor Nikos Petrochilos, with Dr. Victor Kepreotis, President of the Kytherian Association of Australia.

During their visit to the Nicholson Museum (The Ancient World), Sydney University. Wednesday, 19th October, 2005.

www.usyd.edu.au/nicholson

Published in O Kosmos, Sydney, Australia, Thursday 3 November, 2005. p.25.

Kytherian Professor's visit to Australia an enormous success.


Professor Nikos Petrochilos, was invited to visit Australia by the Kytherian Association of Australia. The Association was aided by funds from the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust. Nikos was born in Athens, of Kytherian heritage, and is Emeritus Professor of Latin Literature in the Philosophic School of the University of Thessaloniki. He graduated from the Philosophic School of the University of Athens in 1960 and obtained his PhD in 1973 from the University of London (Westfield College). His PhD dissertation was titled Roman Attitudes to the Greeks. Professor Petrochilos has translated several historical Latin texts into modern Greek (including works by Sallust, Suetonius, Seneca and Erasmus) and has written various works on the cultural relations between the ancient Greeks and Romans. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Crete, Athens and Cyprus. He is also a past President of the National Theatre of Greece. To read more about the life and achievements of Nikos Petrochilos, you are directed to http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=3-10&cid=21&did=7865&pageflip=1.

When the Greek and Classics departments of Universities on the east coast of Australia were advised that Nikos Petrochilos was available to lecture to them, they all clamoured to provide him with a venue, and time to perform these lectures.

Thus at Macquarie University, he lectured at the Museum of Ancient Cultures, on the "Romans the Greeks and the Sea." In Canberra, under the auspices of the Australian National University, on "Roman emulation to the Greek intellectual culture." At La Trobe University, Melbourne, under the auspices of the National Centre for Hellenic Studies, he endevoured to answer the questions, "Did the Ancient Romans know the Greek language? Did they use it?" All these lectures, and more, will be "posted" shortly on the www.kythera-family.net website. Nikos was also special guest at a luncheon held at the Classics Department of the University of Queensland, on Monday the 31st October. On Thursday 20th October, he proposed the Toast "...to the Classics", at the Classical Association (Sydney University) Annual Dinner. At all venues, he spoke to large audiences - far in excess of the numbers that ordinarily attend such functions.

He is lauded as one of the few Classics authorites in the world, who can readily "cross-over" between the Greek and the Roman world. He has translated numerous Roman classics into Greek. His grasp of the Latin language is extrordinary. When he was invited to attend the Vatican in recent years, he was one of very few persons in Rome who could speak fluently and conversationally in the Latin tongue.

Professor Petrochilos's visit, however, is a "janusian" one. What do we mean by "janusian"? Janus was one of the gods of ancient Rome. He was the god of gates and doorways, and was depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions. Analagously Professor Petrochilos's visit presents two faces. The first face is directed to the Classics. The second face is directed to his work as the President of the Society of Kytherian Studies.

The work of the Society of Kytherian Studies is extremely important to Kytherians everywhere. It would be no exaggeration to say, that with respect to the preservation of the Kytherian heritage, environment and ethos, the Society is the premier Kytherian organisation in the world. The superior work and achievements of the Society, however, are little known amongst Kytherian Australians. One of the main purposes of Nikos's visit was to impart knowledge to Australian Kytherians about the depth and breadth of the Society's work.

The Society of Kytherian Studies has published numerous books on Kytherian history, language, heritage and ethos, as well as various archival records from Church registers on Kythera. This includes the recently published large volume on "Kytherian Surnames", which is a very important book for all Kytherians endeavouring to research their geneaology and heritage. It is hoped that this text will soon be translated into English. Other works, such as the "Myths and Legends of Kythera", and the "Kytherian Lexicology" - take us very deep to the core of the Kytherian sense of identity. It would be a great achievement to translate many of the other texts published by the Society, into English as well. All of the Society's texts, have been made available for perusal by Kytherians, at all venues where Nikos has spoken in Australia.

The Society is also engaged in archaeological research and the preservation of Kytherian artefacts and monuments. You can read more about the history and achievements of the Society of Kytherian Studies at http://kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=135-137.

One of the results of Nikos's visit, was to help to draw the various Kytherian Heritage groups around the world, together. This has resulted in a proposal to create the Kytherian World Heritage Council. This Council will be convened in the near future.

The crowning event of the visit was the Parliamentary Luncheon (NSW Parliament House, Macquarie Street), held on 2nd November. It was attended by Ionannis Raptakis, the Consul-General Greece. The Archbishop of the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia, His Eminence, Archbishop Stylianos, was also been invited, to grace the meeting with his presence, but the timetables set out for these two eminent men could not be bought into conjunction.

During this function, a sum in the vicinity of $60,000, collected from various Kytherian organisations, companies, and individuals from around Australia, was gifted to Professor Nikos Petrochilos by the President of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Dr Victor Kepreotis.

This will ensure, that the superb work of the Society of Kytherian Studies, will continue into the future.

History > Photography

submitted by O Kosmos on 06.11.2005

The Roman god Janus, depicted on a Roman coin.

This coin provides an explanation of the word janusian, as used in the article below,

published in O Kosmos, Sydney, Australia, Thursday 3 November, 2005. p.25.

Kytherian Professor's visit to Australia an enormous success.


Professor Nikos Petrochilos, was invited to visit Australia by the Kytherian Association of Australia. The Association was aided by funds from the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust. Nikos was born in Athens, of Kytherian heritage, and is Emeritus Professor of Latin Literature in the Philosophic School of the University of Thessaloniki. He graduated from the Philosophic School of the University of Athens in 1960 and obtained his PhD in 1973 from the University of London (Westfield College). His PhD dissertation was titled Roman Attitudes to the Greeks. Professor Petrochilos has translated several historical Latin texts into modern Greek (including works by Sallust, Suetonius, Seneca and Erasmus) and has written various works on the cultural relations between the ancient Greeks and Romans. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Crete, Athens and Cyprus. He is also a past President of the National Theatre of Greece. To read more about the life and achievements of Nikos Petrochilos, you are directed to http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=3-10&cid=21&did=7865&pageflip=1.

When the Greek and Classics departments of Universities on the east coast of Australia were advised that Nikos Petrochilos was available to lecture to them, they all clamoured to provide him with a venue, and time to perform these lectures.

Thus at Macquarie University, he lectured at the Museum of Ancient Cultures, on the "Romans the Greeks and the Sea." In Canberra, under the auspices of the Australian National University, on "Roman emulation to the Greek intellectual culture." At La Trobe University, Melbourne, under the auspices of the National Centre for Hellenic Studies, he endevoured to answer the questions, "Did the Ancient Romans know the Greek language? Did they use it?" All these lectures, and more, will be "posted" shortly on the www.kythera-family.net website. Nikos was also special guest at a luncheon held at the Classics Department of the University of Queensland, on Monday the 31st October. On Thursday 20th October, he proposed the Toast "...to the Classics", at the Classical Association (Sydney University) Annual Dinner. At all venues, he spoke to large audiences - far in excess of the numbers that ordinarily attend such functions.

He is lauded as one of the few Classics authorites in the world, who can readily "cross-over" between the Greek and the Roman world. He has translated numerous Roman classics into Greek. His grasp of the Latin language is extrordinary. When he was invited to attend the Vatican in recent years, he was one of very few persons in Rome who could speak fluently and conversationally in the Latin tongue.

Professor Petrochilos's visit, however, is a "janusian" one. What do we mean by "janusian"? Janus was one of the gods of ancient Rome. He was the god of gates and doorways, and was depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions. Analagously Professor Petrochilos's visit presents two faces. The first face is directed to the Classics. The second face is directed to his work as the President of the Society of Kytherian Studies.

The work of the Society of Kytherian Studies is extremely important to Kytherians everywhere. It would be no exaggeration to say, that with respect to the preservation of the Kytherian heritage, environment and ethos, the Society is the premier Kytherian organisation in the world. The superior work and achievements of the Society, however, are little known amongst Kytherian Australians. One of the main purposes of Nikos's visit was to impart knowledge to Australian Kytherians about the depth and breadth of the Society's work.

The Society of Kytherian Studies has published numerous books on Kytherian history, language, heritage and ethos, as well as various archival records from Church registers on Kythera. This includes the recently published large volume on "Kytherian Surnames", which is a very important book for all Kytherians endeavouring to research their geneaology and heritage. It is hoped that this text will soon be translated into English. Other works, such as the "Myths and Legends of Kythera", and the "Kytherian Lexicology" - take us very deep to the core of the Kytherian sense of identity. It would be a great achievement to translate many of the other texts published by the Society, into English as well. All of the Society's texts, have been made available for perusal by Kytherians, at all venues where Nikos has spoken in Australia.

The Society is also engaged in archaeological research and the preservation of Kytherian artefacts and monuments. You can read more about the history and achievements of the Society of Kytherian Studies at http://kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=135-137.

One of the results of Nikos's visit, was to help to draw the various Kytherian Heritage groups around the world, together. This has resulted in a proposal to create the Kytherian World Heritage Council. This Council will be convened in the near future.

The crowning event of the visit was the Parliamentary Luncheon (NSW Parliament House, Macquarie Street), held on 2nd November. It was attended by Ionannis Raptakis, the Consul-General Greece. The Archbishop of the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia, His Eminence, Archbishop Stylianos, was also been invited, to grace the meeting with his presence, but the timetables set out for these two eminent men could not be bought into conjunction.

During this function, a sum in the vicinity of $60,000, collected from various Kytherian organisations, companies, and individuals from around Australia, was gifted to Professor Nikos Petrochilos by the President of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Dr Victor Kepreotis.

This will ensure, that the superb work of the Society of Kytherian Studies, will continue into the future.

History > Photography

submitted by O Kosmos on 06.11.2005

Professor Nikos Petrochilos with Committee members from the Women's Auxiliary, Kytherian Association of Australia.

At the lecture held at the Hellenic Club Sydney, Saturday 22 Oct.

Left to Right:
Kathy Samios.
Matina Samios.
Catherine Economos.
Professor Nikos Petrochilos.
Rene Condoleon.
Helen Comino.
Mary Matzouris.

Published in O Kosmos, Sydney, Australia, Thursday 3 November, 2005. p.25.

Kytherian Professor's visit to Australia an enormous success.


Professor Nikos Petrochilos, was invited to visit Australia by the Kytherian Association of Australia. The Association was aided by funds from the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust. Nikos was born in Athens, of Kytherian heritage, and is Emeritus Professor of Latin Literature in the Philosophic School of the University of Thessaloniki. He graduated from the Philosophic School of the University of Athens in 1960 and obtained his PhD in 1973 from the University of London (Westfield College). His PhD dissertation was titled Roman Attitudes to the Greeks. Professor Petrochilos has translated several historical Latin texts into modern Greek (including works by Sallust, Suetonius, Seneca and Erasmus) and has written various works on the cultural relations between the ancient Greeks and Romans. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Crete, Athens and Cyprus. He is also a past President of the National Theatre of Greece. To read more about the life and achievements of Nikos Petrochilos, you are directed to http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=3-10&cid=21&did=7865&pageflip=1.

When the Greek and Classics departments of Universities on the east coast of Australia were advised that Nikos Petrochilos was available to lecture to them, they all clamoured to provide him with a venue, and time to perform these lectures.

Thus at Macquarie University, he lectured at the Museum of Ancient Cultures, on the "Romans the Greeks and the Sea." In Canberra, under the auspices of the Australian National University, on "Roman emulation to the Greek intellectual culture." At La Trobe University, Melbourne, under the auspices of the National Centre for Hellenic Studies, he endevoured to answer the questions, "Did the Ancient Romans know the Greek language? Did they use it?" All these lectures, and more, will be "posted" shortly on the www.kythera-family.net website. Nikos was also special guest at a luncheon held at the Classics Department of the University of Queensland, on Monday the 31st October. On Thursday 20th October, he proposed the Toast "...to the Classics", at the Classical Association (Sydney University) Annual Dinner. At all venues, he spoke to large audiences - far in excess of the numbers that ordinarily attend such functions.

He is lauded as one of the few Classics authorites in the world, who can readily "cross-over" between the Greek and the Roman world. He has translated numerous Roman classics into Greek. His grasp of the Latin language is extrordinary. When he was invited to attend the Vatican in recent years, he was one of very few persons in Rome who could speak fluently and conversationally in the Latin tongue.

Professor Petrochilos's visit, however, is a "janusian" one. What do we mean by "janusian"? Janus was one of the gods of ancient Rome. He was the god of gates and doorways, and was depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions. Analagously Professor Petrochilos's visit presents two faces. The first face is directed to the Classics. The second face is directed to his work as the President of the Society of Kytherian Studies.

The work of the Society of Kytherian Studies is extremely important to Kytherians everywhere. It would be no exaggeration to say, that with respect to the preservation of the Kytherian heritage, environment and ethos, the Society is the premier Kytherian organisation in the world. The superior work and achievements of the Society, however, are little known amongst Kytherian Australians. One of the main purposes of Nikos's visit was to impart knowledge to Australian Kytherians about the depth and breadth of the Society's work.

The Society is also engaged in archaeological research and the preservation of Kytherian artefacts and monuments. You can read more about the history and achievements of the Society of Kytherian Studies at http://kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=135-137.

One of the results of Nikos's visit, was to help to draw the various Kytherian Heritage groups around the world, together. This has resulted in a proposal to create the Kytherian World Heritage Council. This Council will be convened in the near future.

The crowning event of the visit was the Parliamentary Luncheon (NSW Parliament House, Macquarie Street), held on 2nd November. It was attended by Ionannis Raptakis, the Consul-General Greece. The Archbishop of the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia, His Eminence, Archbishop Stylianos, was also been invited, to grace the meeting with his presence, but the timetables set out for these two eminent men could not be bought into conjunction.

During this function, a sum in the vicinity of $60,000, collected from various Kytherian organisations, companies, and individuals from around Australia, was gifted to Professor Nikos Petrochilos by the President of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Dr Victor Kepreotis.

This will ensure, that the superb work of the Society of Kytherian Studies, will continue into the future.

History > Photography

submitted by O Kosmos on 13.10.2007

Kytherian Heritage Group Luncheon. Friday 21st October, 2005.

Published in O Kosmos Thursday 3 November, 2005. p.25.

Photograph: Around the table - Left to right:

Andrew Coroneo, Active interest in the preservation of the Kytherian heritage, particularly cinematic history
Pedro Cassimatis, active member of the Australian Hellenic Historical Society
Angelo Notaras, (obscured) prominent Kytherian industrialist and benefactor, and administrator of www.kythera-family.net
George Poulos, Secretary Kytherian Association of Australia. President Karavitiko Symposium.
Professor Emmanuel Aroney AM, Trustee, The Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust.
Mrs Ann Coward, Ph.D student, and author of numerous articles on the Kytherian heritage.
Professor Tim Gregory, Professor of Archaeology, Ohio State University, USA, and Macquarie University Australia.
Lita Diacopoulos. Ph.D student Archaeology, and member of the APKAS team, performing archeological excavations on Kythera.
John Comino, Alderman Whoolhara Council, and interested in defining the basis of the Kytherian sense of identity.
Professor Nikos Petrochilos.
Professor Minas Coroneo, Professor of Opthalmology, University of NSW. Has conducted a number of large scale, free, eye clinics on Kythera, for residents who otherwise could not receive such treatment. Also interested in preserving the Sophios collection of photographs, and the cinematic heritage of Kytherians in Australia.
Angelo Crones, Solicitor. Trustee of the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust.
Peter Comino. Accountant, Trustee of the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust.
Dr Victor Kepreotis, President, Kytherian Association of Australia.

Kytherian Professor's visit to Australia an enormous success.


Professor Nikos Petrochilos, was invited to visit Australia by the Kytherian Association of Australia. The Association was aided by funds from the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust. Nikos was born in Athens, of Kytherian heritage, and is Emeritus Professor of Latin Literature in the Philosophic School of the University of Thessaloniki. He graduated from the Philosophic School of the University of Athens in 1960 and obtained his PhD in 1973 from the University of London (Westfield College). His PhD dissertation was titled Roman Attitudes to the Greeks. Professor Petrochilos has translated several historical Latin texts into modern Greek (including works by Sallust, Suetonius, Seneca and Erasmus) and has written various works on the cultural relations between the ancient Greeks and Romans. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Crete, Athens and Cyprus. He is also a past President of the National Theatre of Greece. The life and achievements of Nikos Petrochilos

When the Greek and Classics departments of Universities on the east coast of Australia were advised that Nikos Petrochilos was available to lecture to them, they all clamoured to provide him with a venue, and time to perform these lectures.

Thus at Macquarie University, he lectured at the Museum of Ancient Cultures, on the "Romans the Greeks and the Sea." In Canberra, under the auspices of the Australian National University, on "Roman emulation to the Greek intellectual culture." At La Trobe University, Melbourne, under the auspices of the National Centre for Hellenic Studies, he endevoured to answer the questions, "Did the Ancient Romans know the Greek language? Did they use it?" All these lectures, and more, will be "posted" shortly on the www.kythera-family.net website. Nikos was also special guest at a luncheon held at the Classics Department of the University of Queensland, on Monday the 31st October. On Thursday 20th October, he proposed the Toast "...to the Classics", at the Classical Association (Sydney University) Annual Dinner. At all venues, he spoke to large audiences - far in excess of the numbers that ordinarily attend such functions.

He is lauded as one of the few Classics authorites in the world, who can readily "cross-over" between the Greek and the Roman world. He has translated numerous Roman classics into Greek. His grasp of the Latin language is extrordinary. When he was invited to attend the Vatican in recent years, he was one of very few persons in Rome who could speak fluently and conversationally in the Latin tongue.

Professor Petrochilos's visit, however, is a "janusian" one. What do we mean by "janusian"? Janus was one of the gods of ancient Rome. He was the god of gates and doorways, and was depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions. Analagously Professor Petrochilos's visit presents two faces. The first face is directed to the Classics. The second face is directed to his work as the President of the Society of Kytherian Studies.

The work of the Society of Kytherian Studies is extremely important to Kytherians everywhere. It would be no exaggeration to say, that with respect to the preservation of the Kytherian heritage, environment and ethos, the Society is the premier Kytherian organisation in the world. The superior work and achievements of the Society, however, are little known amongst Kytherian Australians. One of the main purposes of Nikos's visit was to impart knowledge to Australian Kytherians about the depth and breadth of the Society's work.

The Society of Kytherian Studies has published numerous books on Kytherian history, language, heritage and ethos, as well as various archival records from Church registers on Kythera. This includes the recently published large volume on "Kytherian Surnames", which is a very important book for all Kytherians endeavouring to research their geneaology and heritage. It is hoped that this text will soon be translated into English. Other works, such as the "Myths and Legends of Kythera", and the "Kytherian Lexicology" - take us very deep to the core of the Kytherian sense of identity. It would be a great achievement to translate many of the other texts published by the Society, into English as well. All of the Society's texts, have been made available for perusal by Kytherians, at all venues where Nikos has spoken in Australia.

The Society is also engaged in archaeological research and the preservation of Kytherian artefacts and monuments. The history and achievements of the Society of Kytherian Studies

One of the results of Nikos's visit, was to help to draw the various Kytherian Heritage groups around the world, together. This has resulted in a proposal to create the Kytherian World Heritage Council. This Council will be convened in the near future.

The crowning event of the visit was the Parliamentary Luncheon (NSW Parliament House, Macquarie Street), held on 2nd November. It was attended by Ionannis Raptakis, the Consul-General Greece. The Archbishop of the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia, His Eminence, Archbishop Stylianos, was also been invited, to grace the meeting with his presence, but the timetables set out for these two eminent men could not be bought into conjunction.

During this function, a sum in the vicinity of $60,000, collected from various Kytherian organisations, companies, and individuals from around Australia, was gifted to Professor Nikos Petrochilos by the President of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Dr Victor Kepreotis.

This will ensure, that the superb work of the Society of Kytherian Studies, will continue into the future.

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Business Group on 05.11.2005

Frutex. A snapshot of products sold, from the Frutex web-site.

Address: 18 St Albans Road
Kingsgrove, NSW, 2208
Australia

Phone Number: (02) 9502 6500
Fax Number: (02) 9502 6511

http://www.frutex.com.au

Managing Director: Peter Magiros

Born: Drymonas, Kythera.

About FRUTEX

"Frutex Australia the "Fruit Experts", founded in 1968, has rapidly expanded into a major force and player consistently delivering quality ingredients to the ever-competitive Food Industry.

Our acquired skills, expertise and management has enabled Frutex to source quality national and international products, investing extensive time to audit, inspect and establish suitability of products, growers, packers and processors.

Frutex demands high standards from growers in Australia and overseas, therefore delivering a constant quality range of extensive key ingredients such as dried fruits and seeds.

Due to our dedication to excellence, innovations, independence and customer focus Frutex has gained marketplace respect.

Frutex has also had foresight - recognising the rapid trend changes within the industry and acting accordingly, thus successfully supplying consistent quality ingredients to an industry suffocated by purchasing inefficiencies, compromising quality and reputation.

Because of our astute market understanding, commitment and experience Frutex Australia has gained world buying power and is positioned to supply into the new millennium".

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Business Group on 05.11.2005

Frutex factory buildings.

Address: 18 St Albans Road
Kingsgrove, NSW, 2208
Australia

Phone Number: (02) 9502 6500
Fax Number: (02) 9502 6511

http://www.frutex.com.au

Managing Director: Peter Magiros

Born: Drymonas, Kythera.

About FRUTEX

"Frutex Australia the "Fruit Experts", founded in 1968, has rapidly expanded into a major force and player consistently delivering quality ingredients to the ever-competitive Food Industry.

Our acquired skills, expertise and management has enabled Frutex to source quality national and international products, investing extensive time to audit, inspect and establish suitability of products, growers, packers and processors.

Frutex demands high standards from growers in Australia and overseas, therefore delivering a constant quality range of extensive key ingredients such as dried fruits and seeds.

Due to our dedication to excellence, innovations, independence and customer focus Frutex has gained marketplace respect.

Frutex has also had foresight - recognising the rapid trend changes within the industry and acting accordingly, thus successfully supplying consistent quality ingredients to an industry suffocated by purchasing inefficiencies, compromising quality and reputation.

Because of our astute market understanding, commitment and experience Frutex Australia has gained world buying power and is positioned to supply into the new millennium".

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Business Group on 05.11.2005

Frutex logo.

Address: 18 St Albans Road
Kingsgrove, NSW, 2208
Australia

Phone Number: (02) 9502 6500
Fax Number: (02) 9502 6511

http://www.frutex.com.au

Managing Director: Peter Magiros

Born: Drymonas, Kythera.

About FRUTEX

"Frutex Australia the "Fruit Experts", founded in 1968, has rapidly expanded into a major force and player consistently delivering quality ingredients to the ever-competitive Food Industry.

Our acquired skills, expertise and management has enabled Frutex to source quality national and international products, investing extensive time to audit, inspect and establish suitability of products, growers, packers and processors.

Frutex demands high standards from growers in Australia and overseas, therefore delivering a constant quality range of extensive key ingredients such as dried fruits and seeds.

Due to our dedication to excellence, innovations, independence and customer focus Frutex has gained marketplace respect.

Frutex has also had foresight - recognising the rapid trend changes within the industry and acting accordingly, thus successfully supplying consistent quality ingredients to an industry suffocated by purchasing inefficiencies, compromising quality and reputation.

Because of our astute market understanding, commitment and experience Frutex Australia has gained world buying power and is positioned to supply into the new millennium".

History > Photography

submitted by George Poulos on 19.11.2005

Gilgandra. Commercial olives. Part of the olive-ization of Australia.

Kelburn Grove
Tooraweenah. 2831.

Ph: 02 6848 1096

Fax: 02 6848 1129

In another entry about the Monterey Cafe in Gilgandra, I revealed that "...I was born in Gilgandra, in 1952, and left after completing my schooling in 1969.

The Kytherian presence in Gilgandra began in 1910, with the Baveas family establishing the ABC Cafe in the town.

A comprehensive history of the Kytherian presence in Gilgandra

From about the end of WWII, until mid-1975 - Gilgandra, population, 2,900 - became a very Kytherian town.

5 families - the Pentes, Sklavos, Kelly (Koumokellie), Psaltis (Protopsaltis), and Poulos (Tzortzopoulos) - lived in close proximity to each other - culturally, residentially, and commercially.

In the main, Kytherians embraced Kytherians - Gilgandra embraced Kytherians - and Kytherians embraced Gilgandra".

During the middle of the year 2004, I took my father, now 88 years old, on a nostalgia tour, back to Gilgandra, and through other towns in the Central and North West of New South Wales.

Not a single person of Kytherian origin now lives in Gilgandra.

Elsewhere I have also spoken about the olive-ization of Australia. This is part of that same phenomenon.

Olive-ization. Hot off the press

Olive-ization of Australia. Swan Valley, Western Australia

Jack Pentes, who ran a store on the intersection of the main street, opposite the Royal Hotel, and lived one street further back, had planted a number of olive trees.

I have outlined the history of Jack's trees in another submission.

Olive trees. Living Memorials to Jack Pentes

The trees on the footpath outside this house in Morris Street, Gilgandra, were planted by Yarni Logothetis, from Logothetyianika, Kythera.

His son, Harry, and daughter-in-law Voula, had purchased the Gilgandra Fruit Shop from their "buzunaki" and brother-in-law Con George Poulos in the early 1970's.

For a few years he came to Australia, and lived in the house with the Logus family.

In a sense you could say that the 2 olive trees are a living memorial to Yarni Logothetis.

Olive trees. Living Memorials to Yarni Logothetis, and other Kytherians in Gilgandra

When I was growing up Australians generally, and Gilgandrians particularly, did not "understand" olives - nor were olives a regular part of their cuisine.

This photograph was taken inside the Coo-ee Heritage Centre, Gilgandra.

It depicts the various olive products that are on sale there, from, .......... Grove, a family company based in the small outlying village of Tooreweenah, near Gilgandra.

This commercial enterprise - is further evidence of the the olive-ization of Australia.

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 30.10.2005

The icon of Ayios Haralmbos being carried around the Church. 2005.

By the Secretary, Kytherian Association of Australia, George Poulos, (Left), and the President, Kytherian Association of Australia, Victor Kepreotis (Right).

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 26.03.2007

Greek Monarchists, 1954 Royal Visit Lismore

Back row L to R: George Peter Feros, Tasia Jim Poulos (Tzortzopoulos of Ballina), Maria Sourry (nee Terakes), Maria Karambasis, Martha Manias (nee Cassis), Zeta Cassis, Anna Caponas (Mullumbimby), Peter Dendrinos.
Front Row L to R: Gerry Cassis, Sophia Bavea, Penny Alidenes (Mullumbimby), Phyllis Crones, Stan Karambasis, Loula Bavea, Mary Crones, Chrissie Cassis, Angelo Crones.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Greek Liberation Day, Bexhill, 25Mar1955

Mrs Mary Black on piano and Mrs Ecaterini Savas conducting.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Woodlark Street, Lismore, 1920

The Comino's moved to Molesworth Street in 1911 to open the Olympia Cafe, while their old shop was demolished to make way for the three storey edifice now in the hands of Peter Coronakes.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Landis Oyster Saloon, Lismore, 1930

L to R: Dulcie Smith, Marika Vlandis, Emmanuel Vlandis
Emmanuel was 17yrs old when he landed from Kythera in mid 1911. In the main he stuck to the café game despite his training as a compositor, but amongst other ventures were a drapery in Sydney, a printery in Melbourne and a fruit hawker’s barrow at Orange. He came from Queensland in the mid 1920s to acquire a café in Casino, coming to Lismore in 1927 to acquire the Andronicos fish shop business. He sold out to Peter Emmanuel Stathis in 1930 and settled permanently in Brisbane.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Lismore Lancers parade down Woodlark Street 1914

Greek flag possibly being flown by Melbourne born Foiti (aka Con) Stratti Andrulakis. Stratti died 1908 and his wife Athena leased the business to Theo Dimitri Bange (Vangis), who moved to Bangalow in 1912 leaving Foiti as the gaffer. Foiti lasted a couple of years after which the place went out of Greek hands, becoming the Uneeda Milk Bar during WW2.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Gollan Fruit Mart, Lismore, 1948

George Andrew Sargent (Stratigakis) left, with unknown employee.
George, born 1908 Cairo, had landed in 1926 and come to Lismore, ~1930/31, perhaps with his half-brother John to establish Sargent’s Markets, but within a year or so he became a driver and buyer for Paul Coronakes. He opened his own business in 1936.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 25.10.2005

Macris Family 1951 Lismore

L to R: Anna (nee Haymandos), baby Chris, George and Con.
George landed from Imbros in 1938 and worked for his sponsor, Panagiotis Emmanuel Petrochilos, at Bonalbo for 12mths, followed by 12mths at the Marble Bar Café in Casino before settling in Lismore. Anna and Con landed in 1948.