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History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 24.02.2006

Map of the State of Maryland.

Indicating the location of the city of Baltimore, and the location of the State of Maryland within the United States of America.

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 24.02.2006

Banner of the Kytherian Brotherhood of Baltimore.

The original banner. On parade.

History > Photography

submitted by Kythera Island Project on 24.02.2006

Graffito of 18th-19th century boat...

.....found on a tile from Agios Georgios tou Vounou (incised marks enhanced for clarity). Photography by A. Bevan 2003.

History > Photography

submitted by - AAIAA - on 22.02.2006

Kythera: A Mediterranean Island through time.

From the Invitation to the Stavros Paspalas Lecture on Archaeological Research on Kythera.

The island of Kythera, best known for its mythological and literary associations with Aphrodite, lies between southern Greece and Crete, and on the western threshold of the Aegean Sea.

Its nodal position as regards seafaring and communication networks was well noted throughout Antiquity and into the Mediaeval period.

An Australian team has conducted an archaeological survey project in the north-central part of Kythera since 1999, and this lecture will present some of its findings set against the background of the island’s history as known from the written sources.

The results of the survey project have documented human presence in the survey area from the Early Bronze Age onwards, with particular peaks during the Minoan, Classical and Late Mediaeval periods. The archaeology of the island provides a view into how the lives of the islanders were affected by developments in the wider Mediterranean world, and how they strove to exploit the resources Kythera offered.



Invitation to Stravros Paspalas Lecture, April 5, 2006

History > Photography

submitted by Wentworth Courier on 16.02.2006

Flags flying high at Bondi Beach.

Wentworth Courier
Wednesday, August 26th, 1998. p.7

By James Wilkinson


When Waverley Council first had a dream of what Camp­bell Parade at Bondi Beach would look like, lots of colour was one of the top priori­ties.

Now, almost two years after the up­grade work started, that priority is becom­ing a reality.

The new Bondi Beach flag was raised last week by the coun­cil onto the flagpoles that line the centre of the main Street of Bondi Beach.

The Mayor of Waverley, Paul Pearce, said it was a major step towards what the council had envisaged for Camp­bell Parade from the beginning.
“The flags really do look good. But this is just a taste of what we are going to see down here,” he said.
“When you look down Campbell Pa­rade, you can see that things are coming to­gether well.
“You are going to get the colour down here that we wanted.”

Cr Pearce said that ultimately banners would line the flag­poles down the street and it was great to see what was already coming out.

“It is the middle of the day now, and just look at it — you have life down here. Now, the other side of the road has to be fin­ished,” he said.

The designer of the flag, Dover Heights resident George Pou­los, said to see the flags flying along Bondi Beach was a
dream come true.

“My eyes light up — look at all of these flagpoles. This is go­ing to give Bondi a real sense of visual identity. There is a lot of colour here — it’s a bit of a revolution,” Mr Poulos said.

Next on the cards for Mr Poulos is cre­ating banners for the poles, but he said that he wanted to do one thing at a time, At the moment, it was concentrating on the flag.

Waverley Council adopted the flag last month. Instrumental in the approval was the opinion of the council precinct com­mittees, and all 14 gave the green light.

Cr Pearce said the flag was for all the Waverley beaches.

Twenty-five flags were bought by the council for Campbell Parade.


Addendum

Since then the flag the has flown at numerous locations around Bondi Beach, including all 25 flag poles along the centre of Campbell Parade. This constituted the longest continuous public display of an Australian ensign which is not the incumbent flag of Australia, in Australian history.

The array of flags was captured forever during the "shooting" of the movie Looking for Alibrandi*. The flags feature (incidentally) in a number of scenes in that movie.

*Looking for Alibrandi - Melina Marchetta

Looking for Alibrandi is the story of Josie Alibrandi's experiences at school, and her relationships with friends and family during her last year at St Martha’s girls’ school. In the year that the novel is set, her father comes back into her life, the year she falls in love and discovers the secrets of her family's past.

Josie tells us the story of her struggles with her Italian-Australian identity and the highs and lows of teenage life. It’s the story of a young girl who feels she doesn’t belong. As the novel unfolds, she learns to cope with these feelings of insecurity and learns that everyone has similar feelings at different times.

Looking for Alibrandi is an analysis of multi-cultural Australia and the struggles that each generation of immigrants has with finding their place in Australian society and defining their identity. Josie, Christina, Nonna Katia and in fact all of the characters have a story to tell about culture in Australian society.

http://www.ozseek.com.au/notes.php?id=164

History > Photography

submitted by George Poulos on 12.02.2006

Karavas. 1950's(?).

Vintage postcard from the 1950's(?), of Karavas, looking North, with the Patrikios Agricultural School in the background.

The young girl on the donkey is - Matina Cominos (nee, Zantiotis) - Sarandakos

History > Photography

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 09.02.2006

Ayios Haralambos. His Life.

Feast Day - February 10th

Ayios Haralambos is the Patron Saint of the village of Karavas, Kythera.

By: The Right Reverend Father Michael D. Jordan

"On February 10th we honor one of the most beloved Saints of the Eastern Orthodox Christian Church. His name is Haralambos. In English, the translation for the name Haralambos used by most Orthodox Christians is "Harry". Haralambos lived in the 2nd century in a small town called Magnesia in Asia Minor. He became a Priest at a very early age and served his community with great zeal.

What has prompted the Orthodox Christians throughout the world to display such love and affection for St. Haralambos? Why has he been so very close to the hearts of all of us for over 1700 years? Perhaps it is because of the fact that no other Priest in the history of Christianity suffered so much in one lifetime for his religious convictions.

In the city of Magnesia, the governor of the province, Loukianos, inflicted great pain upon St. Haralambos because he refused to worship the idols of the Empire. The saintly Priest was first tied to a post in the public square and ridiculed by the pagans. Soldiers of the governor slashed the body of St. Haralambos with heavy cutting irons. St. Haralambos in spite of the terrible agony refused to deny Christ and accept their pagan gods.

After being tortured, Haralambos was dragged by his beard through the streets of Magnesia by soldiers on horseback. Many additional forms of torture were used to force Haralambos to give up his faith, yet he would not. During the ensuing months, St. Haralambos miraculously survived all forms of torture. Eventually the people called him "the man they cannot kill". People spoke of many miracles attributed to St. Haralambos during his imprisonment.

Thousands came to the jail to seek his blessing. Hundreds of afflicted souls came to be healed of their sicknesses. Haralambos became known also as the miracle-worker. He caused the lame to walk and the blind to see. Some thought he was the Resurrected Christ who had returned to earth. St. Haralambos proclaimed to all that he was not the Messiah but he was only the instrument of the Lord's Divine Grace.

The Roman Emperor, Servius, was enraged by the actions of Haralambos and ordered the Saint to be brought to the capital of the Empire that was then located in the ancient city of Antioch (192 A.D.) In the city of Antioch, Haralambos was led about the city with a horse bridle in his mouth. This was done to ridicule both him and the Christian faith, which he continued to uphold.

The soldiers of the Emperor nailed Haralambos to a cross with over 100 large spikes that pierced the skin of the pious Saint. Other forms of torture were administered, and yet Haralambos did not relent or die. In his great anger, the Emperor ordered Haralambos beheaded!

As the two executioners raised their swords to kill the Saint, suddenly a voice was heard from heaven saying, "Well done My faithful servant, enter into the kingdom of Heaven." At that very moment, St. Haralambos passed away without a single blow being struck. The executioners were dumbfounded. They knelt before the body of the Saint and asked God for forgiveness.

The Emperor became even more enraged, and ordered the two would-be executioners of Haralambos beheaded. Their names were Porphirios and Baptos, whose feast is celebrated also on February 10th. Thus the beloved Saint Haralambos truly had become "the man they couldn't kill," for he was taken by God Himself into the Kingdom of Heaven."

The body of St. Haralambos is now in the Monastery of Saint Stephen in the Meteora, Greece, where it performs miracles to this day.

From:

http://www.greekshops.com/detail.aspx?ProdID=102X

Metéora

The name Metéora comes from the Greek work meteorizome, meaning "to hang in mid-air", and the monasteries seem to do just that, perched on a scattering of strangely shaped pinnacles that rise out of the Peneus valley just to the north of Kalambáka. Looming between the Pindos range and the Thessalian plain, the rocks remain an enigma. Some geologists say a prehistoric lake covered the area 30 million years ago and swept away the soil and softer stone as it forced its way to the sea. Others believe the Peneus river slowly carved out the towering pillars, now eroded by wind and rain, that rise to 300 m (984 ft) above the plain.

The natural sandstone towers of Metéora were first used as a religious retreat when a hermit named Barnabas occupied a cave there in 985 CE. Others joined him and also made their homes in the caves that score many of the rocks. In 1336, they were joined by the monk Athanásios from Mount Athos who founded the monastery of Megálo Metéoro on one of the thousand or so pinnacles. Twenty-three monasteries followed by the time of the Ottoman reign of Süleyman the Magnificent (1520-66). However, due largely to their precarious location, many had fallen into ruin by the end of the 18th century. Until the 1920s, the only way to get to most of the monasteries was by being hauled up in a net drawn by rope and windlass, or by equally perilous retractable ladders. A much quoted story relates how an abbot, when asked how often the ropes were changed, replied "when they break." In the 1920s on the orders of the Bishop of Trikala, stairs were carved to make the remaining six monasteries more accessible. Today the ropes are used only for hauling supplies and building materials.

From:

http://www.grisel.net/meteora.htm

Monastery of St. Stephen

[[picture:"Ayios Haralambos - St Stephens Monastery.jpg" ID:6558]]

The original chapel of St. Stephen (Agios Stephanos) was built by the monk Ieremias in 1350 but the rock appears to have been inhabited well before 1200. Its beautiful frescoes have nearly been destroyed by time and by invading vandals. There are two more chapels, Protomartira Stephanou and Agios Haralambos. The latter is an imposing structure with three cupolas. It houses a beautifylly carved wooden iconostasis and altar. Since 1333 the monastery is called Vassiliki (Regal) and Patriarchiki (Patriarchal) because the Byzantine Emperor Andronicus III Palaiologos spend a short time there and made donations. Apart from the manuscripts, liturgical vessels, icons, etc. the monastery holds, it preserves as well, the skull of Agios Haralambos, which is said to be miraculous.

From:

http://www.geocities.com/thessalyindex/meteora.html

History > Photography

submitted by May Lerios on 16.01.2006

Vassilopita

http://www-graphics.stanford.edu/~tolis/recipes/

There are two competing explanations regarding the origin of the name of this cake, tradionally served on New Year's Eve:
It is a composite of Vassilias [king] and pita [pie], and it is so named to commemorate the visit of the three kings to the infant Jesus (the day of Epiphany, celebrated on January 6th).

It is a composite of Vassilis [the Greek form of the name Basil] and pita [pie], and it is so named after the Greek equivalent of Santa Claus, St. Vassilis; every saint in the Greek Orthodox calendar is commemorated on a fixed calendar day, and St. Vassilis's day is January 1st.
This recipe is the easy variety: it's a cake recipe, relying on baking powder. A more complex and time-consuming recipe, but also a more traditional one, relies on yeast and produces vassilopita bread; this type of bread is also known as tsoureki.

For 12 people

In a mixing bowl, place
2 sticks (1/2 lb) unsalted butter. You can soften (but not melt) refrigerated butter by placing it in the microwave for 10 seconds.
1 tbsp shortening (an additional 1/2 tsp is needed later in the recipe).
You may substitute butter with
2 sticks (1/2 lb) margarine, which is soft enough for mixing right out of the fridge.
Mix the butter and shortening until you get a creamy consistency. It's easiest if you use an electric mixer or blender. Add
1 cup sugar,
4 eggs (a total of 5 eggs will be used for this recipe),
and continue mixing until the mixture is even again. It is best that you split the sugar into four equal doses, add each dose along with one egg, and then mix until smooth before proceeding with the next dose; this makes it much easier to keep the mixture smooth.
In a separate bowl, mix lightly (by hand)

3 cups all-purpose flour (unbleached is fine),
1 tsp mahlepi, and
2 tsp baking powder.
In a third bowl, mix lightly (by hand)
1 cup whole milk, with
1/2 tsp vanilla extract.
Now mix the flour and milk bowls into the mixing bowl, in four equal doses, as you did earlier with the eggs and sugar. That is, pour a fourth of the liquid into the mix along with a fourth of the powders, and mix until smooth before proceeding with the next dose. That's the end of the batter.
Grease a cake pan with

1/2 tsp shortening
The shape of the cake pan is up to you. Tradition recommends a round pan, but a bundt cake pan ("Why does this cake have a hole in it?") or a square pan work just as well (although cooking time increases for a bundt cake pan). If you don't have a non-stick pan, also sprinkle evenly
1 tsp flour
along the pan's interior surface, to make sure the cake won't stick to it while baking.
Bake in moderate oven (350 degrees) for 45 minutes. Remove from oven, and insert into the cake a

well-washed small coin, wrapped in aluminum foil (for sanitary reasons).
The coin is part of a tradition shared by Greeks, Albanians, and others: whosever cake piece gets the coin has good luck in the new year. Of course, if you are making this on a day other than New Year's Eve (e.g. for Greek Easter), you may skip the coin.
A point of note here: where money and luck are involved, a fight may break out if the ownership of the coin is disputed. So make sure not to put the coin smack in the middle of the cake (since no piece can claim sole ownership); halfway between the center and edge is just fine. Also, do not place the coin flat on the cake; place it so that it's flush with the surface of the knife that you'll use to cut the cake when it's served. And, finally, put the coin deep enough that the batter will close up behind it, making it invisible: little kids love to turn pies upside-down, and examine the markings on the cake to figure out where the coin had been inserted.

Bake the cake with the coin for an additional 45 minutes. Remove from oven, and then remove the cake from the pan, placing the cake on a cookie sheet right-side-up. Brush with

1 beaten egg (you'll probably use just a third of the egg),
and sprinkle with
1 tbsp sesame seeds
Place back in the oven for 7 minutes, at 250 degrees. Remove from oven, and set aside for 4 hours to let cool down.
For New Year's Eve, here are some serving tips:

Tradition suggests that the master of the house cuts the cake (that's the man, again according to tradition).

Before making any cut, make sure that you clearly state for all to hear who will own the two pieces on either side of the cut. This will prevent conflict if a coin lands between two pieces. If a coin does land between two pieces, it belongs to the piece that has 51% of more of the coin.

Tradition suggests that the first few pieces are allocated to the Holy Trinity and the Virgin (one piece for both or one for each), the household, the poor, and St. Vassilis (one piece each). In practice, those pieces are omitted or combined if too many people are present and the cake is too small.

Tradition also suggests that the next pieces are allocated to the master of the house, then his wife, and then the children from oldest to youngest. Subsequent pieces are allocated to close relatives (e.g. grandparents), then further ones (e.g. cousins), and last are the pieces for present guests. Absent individuals or families are typically not assigned any pieces. Finally, depending on the number of those present and the size of the cake, a whole family may be allocated a single piece.
Of course, feel free to adapt tradition to modern times, or to the specific circumstances of your household; it's the family spirit that matters, not the small details of tradition.

© 2002 May Lerios

Background

The first course of a Greek meal at my home: soup and appetizers.
All recipes on this site came from my mom's kitchen. Some were given to her from family or friends, others she picked up from cookbooks and tweaked to her taste, and so on. She scribbled some of them on pieces of paper, or annotated photocopies of cookbook pages; but over the years, she had memorized them all and her memory was the only place they could be found.

One fine day, I left home to study engineering in college, a few thousand miles away from home. Soon I realized that my mom's cooking was not to be discovered in even the best Greek restaurants in the US; and following standard cookbook recipes didn't produce the result I remembered from childhood. So I asked her for her recipes, and I got them all. But they were the kind of recipes meant to be read by other cooks. I was a kitchen ignoramus and an engineer too: some kasseri meant nothing... How much is some, in pounds? Since I can't find kasseri at the local store, what other cheese can I use? And so I set out to rewrite her recipes into a form that is slightly more idiot-friendly, consulting other cookbooks for substitutions, tables for measure equivalencies, and doing lots of experimentation.

This is the outcome. The neighbor's dog (see the picture above) enjoys the leftovers, even the veggies. Greek friends that taste it at my home find it very authentic. Tell my mom what you think: username recipes; domain lerios.org.

Kali Oreksi!

© 2002 May Lerios

History > Photography

submitted by Athene Anderson, (nee, Gilchrist) on 16.01.2006

Ayias Nikolaos Canberra, ACT.

Located near to Hugh Gilchrist''s residence.

Many Kytherians worship here.

History > Photography

submitted by Athene Anderson, (nee, Gilchrist) on 15.01.2006

Academy of Athens Announcement. Advising Hugh Gilchrist of his award. The Silver Medal.

Advising receipt of the SILVER MEDAL, for recognition of his outstanding achievement in the publication of a three-volume work, entitled Australians and Greeks.

AKAΔΗΜΙA AΘΗΝΩΝ

ACADEMY OF ATHENS

Ο ΠΡΟΙΔΡΟΣ

THE PRESIDENT

H. E. Ambassador Paul Tighe
Australian Embassy in Greece
Athens

Athens, 28 December, 2005
A. 7. 0114

Dear Mr Ambassador,

The Plenary of the Academy of Athens decided to award Ambassador Hugh Gilchrist with the Silver medal, in recognition of his outstanding acheivement in the publication of a three-volume work entitled "Australians and Greeks".

The ceremony of the various Awards by the Acadeny will take place on December 29th, at 6.pm. (it wil last approxiamtely two hours).

Today Ambassador Gilchrist informed the Academy that he will not be able to attend the ceremony and that he would be grateful if a member of the Australian Embassy or other personality could represent him.

Please find herewith two invitations for the ceremony.

I would appreciate an oral reply from the Embassy to the Public Relations Officer of the Academy, Mr Ionnnis Skarentzos (tel: 210 - 36 64 705), or Mrs Evi Angelopoulou (tel: 210 - 316 14 552).

Sincerelely yours


Emmanuel Roucounas

President of the Academy of Athens


The Academy of Athens

The Academy of Athens occupies the right side of a grandiose neo-classical architectural complex, which also includes the National Library (on the left) and the University of Athens (in the middle). The three structures, designed by the Danish architects Christian and Theophil Hansen, stand on the adjacent large lots between Akadimias Street and Panepistimiou (Venizelou) Street in the center of the city.

The Academy was designed by the younger of the Hansen brothers, Theophil, and built between 1859 and 1887. The main entrance to the building is flanked by two tall Ionic columns carrying statues of Athena and Apollo. The side tympana are topped with sculpted owls, symbols of wisdom and of the goddess Athena.

In front, two large sculptures of seated philosophers, usually identified as Socrates and Plato, but perhaps representing Socrates and Aristotle, guard the main staircase.

The embossed compositions on the central pediment and the statues outside are works of the sculptor L. Drosis. The embossed compositions on the eight small pediments are worked by Fr. Melnizki (1875) and the wall-paintings in the interior were made by K. Grupenckel.

The main donator to finance the construction was the family of the Baron Simon Sinas, Ambassador of Greece in Vienna, Berlin and Munich. In 1887, the architect Hernest Ziller, acting as proxy of Sinas' heirs, delivered the building complete to the then Prime Minister Charilaos Trikoupis.

From time to time, preservation and restoration works take place. The facets, the statues and other decorating elements were cleaned in 1980 and the wooden roofs were restored between 1990 and 1992.

By a ministerial decree of 1952, the building, together with eleven other most distinguished edifices of Athens, was identified as preserved monument "in need of special protection" according to the relevant 1950 Law.


Address: 28 Eleftherios Venizelos Ave., 10679 Athens

Prefecture: Attica

District: Attica

Directorate: Cultural Buildings and Restoration of Modern Monuments

Phone numbers: +30-210-36.00.207, 36.00.209

Fax: +30-210-36.42.918

History > Photography

submitted by Athene Anderson, (nee, Gilchrist) on 15.01.2006

Academy of Athens. Advising Hugh Gilchrist of his award. The Silver Medal.

Advising receipt of the SILVER MEDAL, for recognition of his outstanding achievement in the publication of a three-volume work, entitled Australians and Greeks.

AKAΔΗΜΙA AΘΗΝΩΝ

ACADEMY OF ATHENS

Ο ΠΡΟΙΔΡΟΣ

THE PRESIDENT

H. E. Ambassador Paul Tighe
Australian Embassy in Greece
Athens

Athens, 28 December, 2005
A. 7. 0114

Dear Mr Ambassador,

The Plenary of the Academy of Athens decided to award Ambassador Hugh Gilchrist with the Silver medal, in recognition of his outstanding acheivement in the publication of a three-volume work entitled "Australians and Greeks".

The ceremony of the various Awards by the Acadeny will take place on December 29th, at 6.pm. (it wil last approxiamtely two hours).

Today Ambassador Gilchrist informed the Academy that he will not be able to attend the ceremony and that he would be grateful if a member of the Australian Embassy or other personality could represent him.

Please find herewith two invitations for the ceremony.

I would appreciate an oral reply from the Embassy to the Public Relations Officer of the Academy, Mr Ionnnis Skarentzos (tel: 210 - 36 64 705), or Mrs Evi Angelopoulou (tel: 210 - 316 14 552).

Sincerelely yours


Emmanuel Roucounas

President of the Academy of Athens


The Academy of Athens

The Academy of Athens occupies the right side of a grandiose neo-classical architectural complex, which also includes the National Library (on the left) and the University of Athens (in the middle). The three structures, designed by the Danish architects Christian and Theophil Hansen, stand on the adjacent large lots between Akadimias Street and Panepistimiou (Venizelou) Street in the center of the city.

The Academy was designed by the younger of the Hansen brothers, Theophil, and built between 1859 and 1887. The main entrance to the building is flanked by two tall Ionic columns carrying statues of Athena and Apollo. The side tympana are topped with sculpted owls, symbols of wisdom and of the goddess Athena.

In front, two large sculptures of seated philosophers, usually identified as Socrates and Plato, but perhaps representing Socrates and Aristotle, guard the main staircase.

The embossed compositions on the central pediment and the statues outside are works of the sculptor L. Drosis. The embossed compositions on the eight small pediments are worked by Fr. Melnizki (1875) and the wall-paintings in the interior were made by K. Grupenckel.

The main donator to finance the construction was the family of the Baron Simon Sinas, Ambassador of Greece in Vienna, Berlin and Munich. In 1887, the architect Hernest Ziller, acting as proxy of Sinas' heirs, delivered the building complete to the then Prime Minister Charilaos Trikoupis.

From time to time, preservation and restoration works take place. The facets, the statues and other decorating elements were cleaned in 1980 and the wooden roofs were restored between 1990 and 1992.

By a ministerial decree of 1952, the building, together with eleven other most distinguished edifices of Athens, was identified as preserved monument "in need of special protection" according to the relevant 1950 Law.


Address: 28 Eleftherios Venizelos Ave., 10679 Athens

Prefecture: Attica

District: Attica

Directorate: Cultural Buildings and Restoration of Modern Monuments

Phone numbers: +30-210-36.00.207, 36.00.209

Fax: +30-210-36.42.918

History > Photography

submitted by Utah's Greek Americans on 15.01.2006

Utah's Greek Americans.

Co-author Ellen Vidalakis Furgis and her daughter Karen demonstrate how to make Greek pastries at the 1989 Living Traditions Festival.

Photo by Carol Edison, courtesy The Utah Arts Council

http://www.kued.org/productions/greeks/recipes/index.html

Savor the richness of Greek culinary fare through this "hands-on" section of the Utah's Greek-Americans website. While you may have tried Greek cuisine in a restaurant, now is your opportunity to try baking honey-laced baklava, flaky cheese-filled triangles, or cooking aromatic stuffed grape leaves and souvlakia. To offer an example of the Greek Orthodox Easter feast tradition, a recipe for deep red-dyed eggs is also provided.

These easy-to-follow recipes, which range from appetizers to dessert, are excerpted from Greek Cooking at Its American Best, a cookbook co-authored by Ellen Vidalakis Furgis, from Salt Lake City, and D. Eugene Valentine, from Tempe, Arizona.

The subject of Utah's Greek-Americans conjures images of honey-laced layers of dough and nuts that combine to create the rich baklava dessert, or perhaps tangy lemon-rice and beef wrapped in a grape leaf to make dolmates.

Utah's Greek-Americans. A visual documentary history.

While Greek culinary fare offers a sampling of the community's traditions, it is just part of the recipe for Greek life in Utah. Add to it rich immigrant history, blend in Greek Orthodox faith, and combine with family heritage and love, and the formula for KUED's new documentary is complete. Utah's Greek-Americans aired on KUED-Channel 7, in December 2000.

Part of the Many Faces, Many Voices outreach project that celebrates ethnic and cultural diversity, the program was produced and written by Kathleen Fletcher Weiler.

The documentary chronicles the arrival of Greeks in the Intermountain West, many of whom came to America at a time when the country needed cheap labor for the rapid industrialization of the West. Before long Greeks were the dominant labor force in the Intermountain West's railroads, coal and metal mines, smelters and construction crews. Mining towns in Bingham and Carbon County were booming.

"They thought they would stay for a short time -- sojourners," says local historian and author Helen Papanikolas. "But they kept staying to send money for their sister's dowery . A girl could not marry without a dowery and poor people didn't have money for doweries. They also wanted to help their parents because Greece was impoverished."

As a visible and vibrant community today, the Greek-American people owe much to their early immigrant ancestors who in spite of adverse conditions, shaped the Greek-American identity.

"My generation owes a lot to the first generation," says Mike Korologos," who is featured in the program. "They came here penniless. Can you imagine now going to some country where you don't know the language and starting from scratch? We owe a lot to those old timers for teaching us how to work and how to get educated and that's paying off."

Utah's Greek-Americans highlights contemporary Hellenic traditions by giving viewers an inside view of the Greek Orthodox faith, the annual Greek Festivals in Salt Lake City and Price, Orthodox weddings and baptisms. Religious leaders of the Greek Orthodox Church explain how their congregations provide spiritual guidance for members through deep-rooted traditions.

Utah's Greek-Americans is made possible by generous grants from: The R. Harold Burton Foundation, The Hellenic Cultural Association, The Herbert I. and Elsa B. Michael Foundation, and the C. Comstock Clayton Foundation.

History > Photography

submitted by Utah's Greek Americans on 15.01.2006

Utah's Greek-Americans Website.

http://www.kued.org/productions/greeks/recipes/index.html

Savor the richness of Greek culinary fare through this "hands-on" section of the Utah's Greek-Americans website. While you may have tried Greek cuisine in a restaurant, now is your opportunity to try baking honey-laced baklava, flaky cheese-filled triangles, or cooking aromatic stuffed grape leaves and souvlakia. To offer an example of the Greek Orthodox Easter feast tradition, a recipe for deep red-dyed eggs is also provided.

These easy-to-follow recipes, which range from appetizers to dessert, are excerpted from Greek Cooking at Its American Best, a cookbook co-authored by Ellen Vidalakis Furgis, from Salt Lake City, and D. Eugene Valentine, from Tempe, Arizona.

The subject of Utah's Greek-Americans conjures images of honey-laced layers of dough and nuts that combine to create the rich baklava dessert, or perhaps tangy lemon-rice and beef wrapped in a grape leaf to make dolmates.

Utah's Greek-Americans. A visual documentary history.

While Greek culinary fare offers a sampling of the community's traditions, it is just part of the recipe for Greek life in Utah. Add to it rich immigrant history, blend in Greek Orthodox faith, and combine with family heritage and love, and the formula for KUED's new documentary is complete. Utah's Greek-Americans aired on KUED-Channel 7, in December 2000.

Part of the Many Faces, Many Voices outreach project that celebrates ethnic and cultural diversity, the program was produced and written by Kathleen Fletcher Weiler.

The documentary chronicles the arrival of Greeks in the Intermountain West, many of whom came to America at a time when the country needed cheap labor for the rapid industrialization of the West. Before long Greeks were the dominant labor force in the Intermountain West's railroads, coal and metal mines, smelters and construction crews. Mining towns in Bingham and Carbon County were booming.

"They thought they would stay for a short time -- sojourners," says local historian and author Helen Papanikolas. "But they kept staying to send money for their sister's dowery . A girl could not marry without a dowery and poor people didn't have money for doweries. They also wanted to help their parents because Greece was impoverished."

As a visible and vibrant community today, the Greek-American people owe much to their early immigrant ancestors who in spite of adverse conditions, shaped the Greek-American identity.

"My generation owes a lot to the first generation," says Mike Korologos," who is featured in the program. "They came here penniless. Can you imagine now going to some country where you don't know the language and starting from scratch? We owe a lot to those old timers for teaching us how to work and how to get educated and that's paying off."

Utah's Greek-Americans highlights contemporary Hellenic traditions by giving viewers an inside view of the Greek Orthodox faith, the annual Greek Festivals in Salt Lake City and Price, Orthodox weddings and baptisms. Religious leaders of the Greek Orthodox Church explain how their congregations provide spiritual guidance for members through deep-rooted traditions.

is made possible by generous grants from: The R. Harold Burton Foundation, The Hellenic Cultural Association, The Herbert I. and Elsa B. Michael Foundation, and the C. Comstock Clayton Foundation.

History > Photography

submitted by Australian Womens Weekly on 15.01.2006

Australian Women's Weekly. Recipe search

A wonderful resource provides by ACP Publications, The Australian Womens's Weekly, and nine msm.

Recipe search

Search for more than 5000 recipes from The Australian Women's Weekly magazine, cookbooks, and the Fresh cooking show. Simply enter a keyword and hit the search button. To narrow your search, choose from any number of the drop down options. To inspire you, we've provided some suggestions below.

http://aww.ninemsn.com.au/recipesearch.aspx

History > Photography

submitted by Marianthi Milona on 15.01.2006

Small veal rolls with olives and anchovies.

4 slices of veal loin (preferably milk-fed)
2 toast bread slices
6 anchovy fillets
½ cup of green and black olives, pitted
1 dry onion
1 garlic clove
½ bunch finely chopped parsley
½ cup white wine
1 tsp sweet paprika
olive oil and flour
salt & pepper

Crumble the bread in the blender and add the anchovies, olives, onion and garlic. Puree all these ingredients together and spread over each slice of meat.

Wrap the slices into rolls and cut into 3-4 smaller pieces.
Fasten the edges with a toothpick, sprinkle with salt and pepper and flour.

Sauté the rolls in some olive oil taking care that they do not open, sprinkle with paprika and place them in a row in the pan.
Pour over the wine, cover the pan with aluminum foil and bake at 180ο C for 20΄- 30΄ (or more if the meat is not milk-fed).

Serve with finely chopped parsley and pour over the liquids from the pan.

History > Photography

submitted by Marianthi Milona on 15.01.2006

Culinaria Greece: Greek Specialities.

Marianthi Milona

"This delectable volume guides readers through mainland Greece, across the various groups of islands, to Cyprus. After a stopover in the restaurants of Athens, it moves on to the wine growing region of Attica to see how Metaxa brandy and retsina wine are produced, and where salt was discovered to be a culinary treasure.

The tour continues to the Peloponnese peninsula, where grapes and figs flourish and goat cheese is allowed to mature in its good time. The Ionian islands tempt the visitor with the meat dish sofrito, while Thessaloniki welcomes visitors to the many kafenions and peripterons—taverns and cafés--of the northern mainland, and Macedonia offers fruit, salads, tomatoes, okra, and eggplant, as well as Macedonian wine and local tobacco.

Far more than a cookbook, each volume of the Culinaria series is a lavishly detailed and illustrated reference work for an entire cuisine, written by those who know it best. Delving into the history, tradition, and the nature of the land, as well as ingredients, tips, and cooking techniques, the book takes a region-by-region tour overflowing with information and pictured in more than 1000 color photographs, maps, and drawings. Hundreds of evocative and mouth-watering recipes are presented, along with the local produce, wines, cheeses, and other specialties that complete the experience of dining in the region.

Those who seek out the land of the Greeks with their souls also like to nourish their bodies a la Greek. In the homeland of Homer, Sophocles, and Plato, where historical-cultural treasures and Mediterranean flair are part of everyday life, the love of good food is an integral element of the culture.

More than 1,300 colored illustrations on 460 pages as well as numerous authentic recipes make even reading this book an experience for the palate".

https://royalolympiccruises.com

History > Photography

submitted by Grecian Plate Cookbook on 15.01.2006

The Grecian Plate Cookbook.

Compiled by the women of St Barabara's Church in Durham, NC, National Winner of the Prestigious R.T. French Company Tastemaker Cookbook Award and March 1988 CookBook of the Month from Good Housekeeping Magazine.

Traditional Recipes for the contemporary cook.

Nearly 300 time-tested recipes from appetizers to desserts

Step-by-step instructions and many easy to follow illustrations

Special Chapter features 'trim' versions of traditional recipes

Hardcover-Spiral-bound to lay flat, 254 pages

Introductions to the chapters provide insight into the origins of recipes and how they fit into daily life in Greece

Now in it's 9th Printing!

available by sending $21 to:
Ms. Erie Cocolas
1298 Wildwood Drive
Chapel Hill NC 27514

E-mail to purchase the book here :

History > Photography

submitted by George Poulos on 11.08.2008

A Flag for Kythera. Proposal 4. A Flag for Kythera. Proposal 3. Utilising the symbol for womanhood as it is currently depicted.

This symbol is based on the original symbol for Aphrodite - Venus (Venus is the Romanised version of Kythera's Aphrodite).

The symbol for Venus, based on the even older Egyptian symbol of the ankh, is that which is now being used in the Western World for the symbol of womanhood, ie, a cross placed on a circle.

Here I have retained the symbol in its original form.

The visual allusion to the Greek cross and the Greek national flag is deliberate.

Good iconography and vellilography is based on the principle of "distillation to essence" - what is the minimal visual data that can be used to denote a particular entity or place - in this case Aphrodite, and by extension Kythera.

In iconography and vellilography - "less is more".

The "re-worked" Venus/Aphrodite symbol fulfils this edict.

However, I believe that the Version 1 flag, in which the cross has been removed from the periphery, and has been replaced to the centre of the circle is a far more satisfying design.

To appreciate the power and primal nature of the womanhood/Aphrodite symbol - go to:

Symbols.com Online Encyclopaedia of Western signs and ideograms

http://www.symbols.com/encyclopedia/41a/41a7.html

This is also the symbol still in use by astronomers to designate the planet Venus (Aphrodite).

You will note that in accordance with "best" Heraldic practice - at no stage have either of the metals (silver (white), and gold (yellow)), been placed next to each other in the design. They have always been de-marcated and/or fimbriated, ("bordered") by a colour.

History > Photography

submitted by George Poulos on 14.01.2006

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History > Photography

submitted by George Poulos on 14.01.2006

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