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History > Photography

submitted by National Archives, Australia on 29.04.2006

The Greek Orthodox Primate receiving his naturalisation certificate in 1979.

National Archives Australia, Canberra, A.C.T.

From,

Article on groundbreaking Greeks, NAA

History > Photography

submitted by Jim Comino on 26.04.2006

titel

 

History > Photography

submitted by Neos Kosmos, Melbourne on 21.04.2006

Happy Easter

Kali Anastasi. Kalo Paska.

http://www.neoskosmos.com.au

History > Photography

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 18.04.2006

Panayiotis Alfieris 1855-1927

Obituary of Panayiotis Alfieris from the Promitheos Newspaper in San Francisco, CA, printed March 22, 1935

History > Photography

submitted by Marina S Pentes on 18.04.2006

Church of Myrtidiotissa, Dubbo, NSW, Australia.

From a booklet, commemorating the opening of the church of "Panayias Myrtithiotissis" - Myrtidiotissa - Dubbo, NSW.

30th September, 1962.

History > Photography

submitted by Alexandra Biggs on 16.04.2006

Castritsis Dimitri

 

History > Photography

submitted by Alexandra Biggs on 16.04.2006

Castritsis Penelope

 

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 14.04.2006

The Honourable Bob Carr, Peter Prineas & George Poulos.

At the Sydney launch of Peter Prineas' book, Katsehamos and the Great Idea.

See also:

Speech introducing Bob Carr at the Sydney launch

Review(s) of the book

Professor Janis Wiltons' speech, Bingara book launch

Details of the Bingara book launch, photograph unveiling, and 70th Anniversary Ball

Founders photographs unveiled, Roxy, Bingara

Flyer_-_Roxy_70th_Anniversary.pdf

Kytherians flocked to Bingara from everywhere

Peter Feros's descendants

Descendants and freinds of Roxy Theatre founder, Peter Feros


The book Katsehamos and the Great Ideais available from the publisher,
Plateia Press,
32 Calder Road, Darlington, NSW,
or email here
phone (02) 9319 1513
and also from Gleebooks, 49 Glebe Point Road, Glebe NSW, 2037 and selected bookshops.

Katsehamos and the Great Idea is also available in the New England and Northwest region of NSW, from the Roxy Theatre, Maitland Street, Bingara.
Phone: 02 67240003
or email here

For further information
Phone: Sydney, (02) 9319 1513
Mobile: 0429 322 857

History > Photography

submitted by Janis Wilton on 06.04.2006

Katsehamos and the Great Idea, by Peter Prineas,

Professor Janis Wilton and author, Peter Prineas, outside the Roxy Theatre, Bingara, April 1, 2006.


New book 'taps into my own passions' Professor tells Roxy audience.

published by Plateia, Sydney, 2006.

An address given at the book launch,
Roxy Theatre, Bingara, April 1, 2006
by Associate-Professor Janis Wilton,
School of Classics, History and Religion,
University of New England, NSW.


'Katsehamos and The Great Idea' is an engaging book that taps into topics and experiences which are close to my own passions. It pulls together family history, immigration history and local history. It provides strong portraits of individuals, their personalities, desires, frailties, failures and achievements. It locates Australian experiences in a broader world context, especially a context which links to Greece and to events in Europe. It offers strong descriptions of different places. It utilises oral histories, government records, newspaper articles, family photographs and other memorabilia. And, above all else, it is easy to read and engaging.

The focus is the Roxy Theatre in Bingara, north-western NSW, but, rather than dominating the book, the Roxy provides an anchor for exploring topics like the lives and experiences of the three men responsible for building the theatre, the nature and networks of Kytherian immigrants both in and beyond Australia, and the place of cafes and cinemas in the political, social and economic life of Bingara.

Let me give you a taste of the range, depth and style of the book and of the ways in which Peter has woven his account of uncovering the various stories with the stories themselves.

The book begins in Kythera with Peter describing his first encounter with his ancestral island and the family village of Mitata in the 1970s. The landscape, the feel of the place, the colours and contours come through.

'Mitata, my family's village, is high up in the centre of the island. It sits on the edge of a plateau above a verdant ravine filled with orchards and garden and watered by an unfailing spring. From the village square or plateia you can look down on lemon trees and funereal cypresses, and follow the line of the dry watercourse as it passes beneath the hill of Palaiokastro to the olive groves at Palaiopolis and the sea.
Mitata was a village of closely-set stone houses with tiled roofs, the narrow streets converging on the plateia and the great domed church of Aghia Triatha. Around the plateia or not far from it were a couple of kafenia, while the school and the municipal building stood a little distance away. There were many empty houses, some of them falling into ruin, but many were lived in and cared for, their rubble walls sealed with cement and whitewash, the wooden doors and shutters painted an innocent blue.'

This is a style repeated throughout the book - different places in the story get evocative descriptions of their natural and built environments.
'At Manilla, and north through Barraba and Bingara, the country is like a great ramp descending from the high tableland of New England to the western plains of New South Wales. It is hill country, warmer and drier than New England, with good grazing land marked out by box trees and red gum, while the barren ridges and stony hills carry ironbarks and white cypress. The Namoi flows beneath tall river oaks, river red gums and twisted angophoras, and as it makes its way west the river passes the volcanic spires of the Nandewar Range. Tall trees grow on the high ridges there, forests of silvertop ash and manna and mountain gum, and ghostly snow gums haunt the peak of Kaputar.'

These are the perceptions and words of a person well versed in viewing and treasuring our environment. They reflect very much on Peter's life and work in nature conservation. His earlier books include Wild Places and Colo Wilderness.
Chapter two is set in America. Peter went there in search of the records and experiences of his grandfather and other family members who migrated to the United States early in the twentieth century and before eventually migrating to Australia. In this chapter - as elsewhere in the book - there are reflections on the challenges facing family historians as they disentangle family myths, contradictory evidence, and silences. For example, is the Panayiotis Firos who appears in the American immigration records, Peter's grandfather or someone else with a similar name? Why do family members give different accounts and dates of their migration experiences at different times? is this to do with illegal immigration, faulty memory, changing stories to fit changing circumstances? Peter speculates and offers answers.

Peter also mines his sources to create a sense of the personalities of individuals central to his story. For example, he provides the following description of his great uncle Philippos Feros drawing partly on 1910 shipping records held in the United States:

'A few years older than his brother Panagiotes, Philippos was a strong man with the build of a wrestler. He had been a sailor with the British Merchant Service. He had served in the Greek Army. He knew his way around. The carefully formed script of the passenger manifest is disturbed in several places by what may be Philippos' insistent hand. He would not have his name spelt 'Fyros'; it is struck out and 'Firos' written in its place. Later, following his brother Peter's example, he would change the spelling to 'Feros'. He would not be described as a 'workman'; this was struck through and 'sailor' written in its place. Nor would he allow anyone to demean his financial standing; where '$25.00' had been written as the amount of cash in his possession, this was crossed out and '$38.00' written instead.'

Another important feature of the book is the amount of detail given on the impact of wars in Europe, the military service of family members, and the importance of ongoing connections to Kythera. Migration to Australia did not mean cutting off ties with home: wives and children often stayed behind in Kythera, visits home were desired and expected. Indeed, it was while Panagiotes Firos (Peter Feros) was on a visit to his family in Kythera that his two partners in Peters & Co here in Bingara, decided to expand and get the building of the Roxy complex underway.

Peter's excursion into what he labels at one stage 'the cinema wars' is particularly revealing. He provides background on the open air cinema created in Bingara in 1912 by William Finkernagel and John Veness, the demise of that cinema through Victor Peacocke's creation of the Regent Theatre in the Soldiers' Memorial Hall, and then the campaign by Peacocke to sideline the Roxy Theatre development. Into the mix go anti-Greek sentiments, lobbying of government agencies, and a newspaper advertising campaign.

There are also fond and evocative memories of the entertainment offered through the Roxy, the food served at the local cafes, and the interiors and staff of those cafes. There is a detailed account and description of the building of the Roxy, its features, its programs, its failure as a business enterprise for its three founders and its subsequent history. There are also details about what happened to the Roxy's founders after the failure of their business enterprise.

These are but small tastes of what the book has to offer.
It is a book that provides insights into local, family and community history. It evokes the loneliness and challenges of migration. It portrays life in Bingara in the 1930s. And it reveals the passion and commitment of its author in his journey of discovery into his own history and heritage, and his willingness and ability to share the fruits of that discovery with a wider audience.

It is my honour and pleasure to launch 'Katsehamos and the Great Idea' written by Peter Prineas as part of the celebrations to mark the seventieth anniversary of the Roxy Cinema and as an acknowledgement of the important contribution made not just by Peter Feros (Katsehamos), George Psaltis (Katsavias) and Emmanuel Aroney (Theodoropoulos), the founders of the Roxy, but by all Greek immigrants who, particularly during the first part of the twentieth century, contributed significantly to the services and lifestyles available in towns throughout regional Australia.

The book is available from the publisher,
Plateia Press,
32 Calder Road, Darlington, NSW,
or email here
phone (02) 9319 1513
and also from Gleebooks, 49 Glebe Point Road, Glebe NSW, 2037 and selected bookshops.

Katsehamos and the Great Idea is also available in the New England and Northwest region of NSW, from the Roxy Theatre, Maitland Street, Bingara.
Phone: 02 67240003, or
email here

History > Photography

submitted by O Kosmos on 05.04.2006

Katsehamos and the Great Idea.

Author: Peter Prineas
When Published: 2006
Publisher: Plateia Press
Available: Plateia Press,
32 Calder Road, Darlington, NSW,
or email here
phone (02) 9319 1513
and also from Gleebooks, 49 Glebe Point Road, Glebe NSW, 2037 and selected bookshops.

Katsehamos and the Great Idea is also available in the New England and Northwest region of NSW, from the Roxy Theatre, Maitland Street, Bingara.
Phone: 02 67240003
or email here

Description: Paperback, 240pp, Bibliography, Index.


From, O Kosmos, Thursday 30th March, 2006. p.25.

Country town picture theatre reveals a different history

When Peter Prineas learned in 2004 that his grandfather, Peter Feros, nicknamed ‘Katsehamos’, had built a picture theatre in the small town of Bingara in the 1930s, he wanted to know more about it. The result is ‘Katsehamos and the Great Idea - a true story of Greeks and Australians in the early twentieth century’, a book that digs deep into the shared history of Greeks and Australians, and the sometimes turbulent relations that existed between them in the period during and after the First World War. Along the way the story offers a different perspective on Gallipoli and other aspects of Australian history.

Prineas follows Peter Feros’s journey to America as a sixteen year-old boy in 1907, his return to Greece with much patriotic fanfare in 1912 in the company of thousands of other American Greeks to fight in the Balkan Wars, and his journey to Australia in 1921. The book recounts how Peter Feros, with his brothers Phillip and Manolis, between them fought four wars for the ‘Great Idea,’ Greece’s bid to reclaim Constantinople and her former Byzantine glory. The dream was shattered on the plains of Anatolia in 1922.

In Australia, Peter Feros prospered and in the 1930s he became caught up in another ‘Great Idea’. This time it was in the small town of Bingara in north-western NSW where the commercial ambitions of one of his business partners, George Psaltis ‘Katsavias’, entangled him in the building of the ‘Roxy’, an art deco picture theatre impressive enough to grace a city. The book’s account of Bingara’s ‘cinema wars’ is a fascinating addition to Australian picture theatre history. Although success in the cinema business eluded him, Peter Feros endured and went on to build a new life. In the end, ‘Katsehamos’ is about the journey of a man and his family towards accepting, and being accepted by, Australia.

Peter Prineas has worked as a lawyer, environmental consultant and writer. He has written or contributed to books on Australian landscape and environment but ‘Katsehamos’ is his first book of historical writing. He lives in Sydney.

‘Katsehamos and the Great Idea’ was launched at the Roxy Theatre in Bingara by Associate-Professor Janis Wilton of the University of New England, at 6.30 pm on Saturday April 1. The book launch was followed by the unveiling of a plaque and photographs commemorating the three Greeks from Kythera, – Peter Feros, George Psaltis and Emanuel Aroney – who opened the Roxy in 1936. The Roxy Theatre has been restored and reopened by Gwydir Shire Council and is now a regional centre for cinema and the performing arts. A large crowd of Kytherian Greek descendants is expected in Bingara on Saturday for the book launch and dedication which form part of the Roxy Theatre’s 70th anniversary celebrations.

General release of the ‘Katsehamos’ book will commence with the Sydney launch by Bob Carr at 7.00 pm on Wednesday April 12, at 'Alexander's on the Park', ground floor American Express building, 175 Liverpool Street (opposite Hyde Park).

The book will be available from the publisher,
Plateia Press,
32 Calder Road, Darlington, NSW,
or email here
phone (02) 9319 1513
and also from Gleebooks, 49 Glebe Point Road, Glebe NSW, 2037 and selected bookshops.

Katsehamos and the Great Idea is also available in the New England and Northwest region of NSW, from the Roxy Theatre, Maitland Street, Bingara.
Phone: 02 67240003
or email here

For further information
Phone: Sydney, (02) 9319 1513
Mobile: 0429 322 857

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 20.04.2006

Unveiling at Roxy Theatre Bingara

Unveiling of the photographs of the founding partners of Peter's & Co Roxy Theatre at Bingara by Peter Prineas,Saturday 1st april 2006

The unveiling coincided with the launch of the book, Katsehamos and the Great Idea.

More photographs, pp.107-114, in Katsehamos and the Great Idea.


Photo's left to right, then proceeding clockwise:

Left: Peter Feros Katsehamos (left) and George Psaltis Katsavias. Bingara, 1920's.

Top: Roxy Theatre interior, Bingara, 1936, view to back.

Right: Emmanuel Theodropoulos Aronis (Emanuel Aroney), Bingara, 1920's.

Bottom: The Roxy Theatre with unfinished facade, and Peters and Co.'s cafe and shops. Bingara, April 1936.

PLAQUE

THE FOUNDERS OF BINGARA’S ROXY THEATRE

Bingara’s Roxy Theatre was founded by
Peter Feros, George Psaltis and Emanuel Aroney.
The three men came to Australia from the Greek Island of Kythera in the early 1920s and formed the cafe partnership of Peters & Co, Bingara.
The Roxy Theatre opened on Saturday March 28, 1936 to a packed house.
Mr George Psaltis addressed the crowd on behalf of Peters & Co. and
“expressed his appreciation of the support of the people of Bingara and district, whose friendship and encouragement had given them the inspiration to carry on in the face of all the obstacles that had beset them. They were but the servants of the people and they were out to give them the utmost value for money, both in entertainment and service.”


Mr GEORGE COSMAS PROTOPSALTIS, now in his nineties, gave a speech at the unveiling, about the qualities of the founders, and their hard work ethic. George came to Australia at the age of 14 in 1928.

George Cosmas Protospsaltis leaving Kythera as a youth

He worked in cafes in Armidale, and other country towns. He was a partner at the Golden Bell Cafe in Barraba in the late 1930s, a business which was previously owned by Peters & Co., the firm which built the Roxy. George was the only person present who knew personally. the three partners of Peters & Co.


See also:

Review(s) of the book

Professor Janis Wiltons' speech, Bingara book launch

Details of the book launch, photograph unveiling, and 70th Anniversary Ball

Flyer_-_Roxy_70th_Anniversary.pdf

Peter Feros's descendants

Descendants and freinds of Roxy Theatre founder, Peter Feros


The book Katsehamos and the Great Ideais available from the publisher,
Plateia Press,
32 Calder Road, Darlington, NSW,
or email here
phone (02) 9319 1513
and also from Gleebooks, 49 Glebe Point Road, Glebe NSW, 2037 and selected bookshops.

Katsehamos and the Great Idea is also available in the New England and Northwest region of NSW, from the Roxy Theatre, Maitland Street, Bingara.
Phone: 02 67240003
or email here

For further information
Phone: Sydney, (02) 9319 1513
Mobile: 0429 322 857

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 01.04.2006

Peter Prineas & Katsehamos

Peter Prineas at the launch of his book 'Katsehamos and the Great Idea' in the Roxy Theatre at Bingara NSW Australia Saturday 1 April 2006

History > Photography

submitted by Bon Appetit, Magazine on 28.02.2006

Bon Appétit!

Undiscovered Kythera.

— Adapted from an article by Rand Richards Cooper; produced by Mara Papatheodorou; recipes by Aglaia Kremezi, Bon Appétit, May 2002

Reproduced on the Epicurious website:

http://www.epicurious.com/bonappetit/features/travel/kythera

FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERICKA McCONNELL

If you associate anything with Kythera, it's probably romance. One myth names the island as the birthplace of Aphrodite, goddess of love; and I could see the very spot from the sun-splashed terrace at the Hotel Margarita.

"They say she was born right there," the hotel's friendly owner, Panajotis Fatseas, told me, pointing to an unremarkable offshore islet called Avgo (the egg). He seemed doubtful. So have many visitors down through the centuries who've come expecting the sylvan glades and cavorting lovers of Watteau's famed 1717 painting, The Pilgrimage to Cythera. It's not that Kythera isn't beautiful. It is, but with the desolate beauty of villages huddled on windswept moors and solitary monasteries high atop rocky cliffs.

From my hotel it was easy to explore the town of Kythera, all the way up to the crumbled stone walls and rusted cannons of its sixteenth-century Venetian fortress. Back in the nearly deserted town (there was only a handful of tourists on the entire island), I wandered streets where whitewashed houses made a canvas for pink bougainvillea and pomegranate trees dangling their gold-red treasures. A big north wind — the same one that blew Odysseus past Kythera toward the land of the lotus-eaters — whistled through the lanes, banging a shutter.

Kythera can be spooky. It has places like Aroniadika, a hillside village where it seems tumbledown houses outnumber tenanted ones, and where ghosts are said to prowl at night; and the clifftop ruins of Paleohora, the medieval capital, which the pirate Barbarossa sacked in 1537.

I kept smelling licorice, and finally traced the scent to my own hand; I had torn a sprig off a maratho bush at the fortress, and a rumor of wild fennel stayed with me all day. Kythera is a big herb garden that leads you from scent to scent; you visit with your nose. Thyme abounds, its aroma gracing the island's renowned honey. Sweet basil grows in the garden of the walled monastery Moni Myrtidion. And if the legend of rosemary — said to grow only in the yard of a righteous person — is true, then Kythera is surely an island of saints.

The island abounds in local food products. Stavros, a specialty foods store near the town square, carries many of them — tangy mezithra cheese, marmalades made from lotus and quince, honey-walnut cookies called melomakarona, and Fatourada, a kind of Greek grappa, flavored with cinnamon and cloves.

I loved Greek island food: the simple preparations, seasonal ingredients, and bold flavors. Portions weren't timid, either. My first night, at a popular psarotaverna called Magos, I sat at a table under the stars, cats purring hopefully underfoot as I took on a gargantuan red mullet, grilled with lemon and butter. The fish was so huge and delicious I felt like Philoxenes, a Kytheran of yore who, when told by his physician that the size of the fish he was eating could kill him, calmly replied, "Be it so, but before I die, let me finish."

But even the smallest of dishes can inspire such gluttonous praise — particularly the famous mezedes. These appetizer-like preparations — salads, savory pastries, spreads, and fritters — may be either eaten at the start of a meal or combined to make a multi-course, tapas-like feast. They are an excellent introduction to an island's cuisine and can be found in any taverna.

Taverna dining is home cooking in the deepest sense; it's what you get on an island where the highest praise of a restaurateur is "He buys nothing." I enjoyed simple-but-memorable dishes at restaurants everywhere: a luscious version of fassolakia freska (green beans) with lemony chunks of sautéed squash at Myrtóon; spiky-hot tyri kafteri (pepper cheese) at Zorba's; a baked eggplant dish called papoutsakia (little shoes) at Panaretos, where the waitress explained the dish by pointing at her feet; and great moussaka at Pierro's in Livadi.

Culinary life in a place like Kythera, where the person serving your food most likely grew or raised it, remains rooted in rural village ways. The unity of farm, food, and family was plain to see at Taverna Filió in Kalamos, where sheep stood bleating in the lot when I pulled in.

Nikos and Katerina Kalligerou, the energetic young couple who run Filió along with Nikos's parents, showed me around. In the kitchen Katerina described the local specialties on her menu, like xinohondros, a type of pasta made from cracked wheat boiled with goat's milk; and outside Nikos showed me the family's fruit orchard and vineyard, the grape skins and pulp collected in containers for making tsípouro, a kind of Greek grappa."When we make it, we all are drunk," he said, then winked at me as his grandmother waved from the porch next door.

There's an alluring wholeness to Kythera's artisan way of life. At Roussos Ceramics, a family-run ceramic works in Livadi, I was shown around by Maria, who with her mother, Grigoria, does the painting and glazing, while her father, Yiannis, and brother, Panajotis, throw the pots. All were busy in the workshop with the big fourno and shelves of exquisite dishes, jugs, vases, and urns. Grigoria served ruthlessly strong Greek coffee with almond biscuits and a glass of water (the water that, in America, would be in the coffee), as I admired pieces made long ago by Maria's great-grandfather. Maria told me she still sees his handiwork in houses all over Kythera. "I always know when something is his," she said. "He had a certain style."

On Kythera, nature itself has a certain style, creating art like the stones on the beach at Kaladi, in rich shades of garnet and chocolate crisscrossed with spidery striations of white; or the brilliant pink blossoms of the oleanders in the town square, whose aroma reaches an ecstasy of sweetness even as they die.

And that is Kythera too, mixing eros and thanatos, mortality heightening the sense of beauty. At a waterfall below the village of Milopotamos, I saw a young couple holding hands along a path that wound among trees, vines, and overgrown houses. It was a scene scripted by a romantic poet: the ruined houses, the rushing cataract, the spirits in the glade. Aphrodite's island is a good place for lovers, after all. It quiets you with its solitude, then quickens you with its sudden and surprising beauty.

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Society Of St. Louis on 25.02.2006

Missouri. Map.

Road Map of Missouri.

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Society Of St. Louis on 25.02.2006

Map of Missouri, USA.

Showing the location of St. Louis, centre for a Kytherian Association, and the relationship of Missouri within the United States of America.

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Society Of Pennsylvania on 24.02.2006

Pennsylvania road map.

More detailed map.

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Society Of Pennsylvania on 24.02.2006

Map of Pennsylvania.

In relationship to the rest of the United States of America.

History > Photography

submitted by Kythera Island Project on 24.02.2006

Photograph of Kythera by satellite.

Satellite image of the Aegean: Kythera circled in orange
(28/10/02, Terra MODIS, NASA)

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/kip/introduction.php

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Brotherhood Of Detroit on 24.02.2006

Map of Michigan, USA.

A more detailed map.

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Brotherhood Of Detroit on 24.02.2006

State of Michegan, in relationship to the USA.

Also indicating the location of the capital, Detroit.