kythera family kythera family
  

Photography

History > Photography

Showing 481 - 500 from 685 entries
Show: sorted by:

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 04.06.2006

Crethar's Cafe Lismore

After the destruction of the 1945 flood Angelo Crethar’s restaurant was again renovated and made even more opulent, cementing his establishment as the favoured haunt of Lismore’s glitterati, particularly the after-theatre dress circle crowd. But fearing poaching by the ever-innovating Capitol, at one stage he introduced silver goblets for the serving of hot milkshakes during winter, quickly finding that the things were too hot to handle and generating much amusement amongst his compatriots (who subsequently offered Latte in glasses without handles.) The engraver’s spelling of ‘Crether’s’ was an omen.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 04.06.2006

Crethar's Cafe

The batch number on the right hand plate is hard to read, but looks like 12-1935, while ‘Crethar’s’ on the left is 06-1939, coincidental with the date of Angelo Crethar’s makeover of his premier Sundae Shop into ‘Crethar’s Airconditioned Café.’

Angelo probably made a bulk order for crockery to supply his 4 Sundae Shops in town, opened progressively from 1923 after his arrival from Ballina. Around 1935 he consolidated in his main outlet in Molesworth Street.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 04.06.2006

Bavea's Catering Company

Over 25yrs Jack Bavea catered for weddings and functions at nearly every village hall in the Richmond region, often completing a circle in provisioning wedding feasts for the children of the parents he had earlier catered for.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 04.06.2006

Bavea's Catering Company Lismore

These plates are from batch ’04-1930’ (but could be 1950 – it’s hard to read)
Jack Nick Bavea ran the catering service 1929-56.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 04.06.2006

Garden of Roses cafe Lismore

These plates are from the same batch as the Feros plate, dated ’11-1923’, suggesting that in one trip the gifted travelling salesman made a successful pitch to a number of Greek café proprietors.
Peter Nick Bavea revamped his Lismore cafe into the Garden of Roses in 1920.

History > Photography

submitted by Peter Tsicalas on 04.06.2006

Feros Cafe Lismore

This plate came from a batch dated ’11-1923’ and was probably part of a bulk order placed by the extended Feros clan, who had branches at Byron Bay, Ballina and Lismore at this time (having sold out of Mullumbimby in 1921, but not extending their reach to Evans Head until 1936/37). Apart from Angelo Crethar, the Feros were the only restaurateurs in the region to use their own moniker as a café name, perhaps signalling grand visions of a franchise chain, or seeking to establish a high-recognition brand name like Comino and Peters. (Besides, it was an expensive business to change a café name – unless taking the Johnny Feros route of covering all bases with an assortment of crockery embossed with ‘Monterey’, ‘Marble Bar’, etc. Don’t ask.)

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 01.06.2006

Research Library. The National Film and Sound Archive,

The view from the Research Librarians desk.

Until recently, the Archive was known as ScreenSound Australia.

The Archive is part of the Australian Film Commission.

It is Australia's audiovisual archive, collecting, preserving and sharing the nations moving image and recorded sound heritage.

For the Kytherian community - which has always been very heavily involved in the Radio & Cinema industry in Australia, at various levels, it is a very valuable resource.

Canberra Office

McCoy Circuit Acton
GPO Box 2002
Canberra ACT 2601
Australia

Tel: 02 6248 2000
Fax: 02 6248 2165

Sydney Office

Fox Studios Australia
Level 1 Frank Hurley Grandstand Building
FSA #63 Driver Avenue
Moore Park NSW 1363 Australia

Tel: 02 9380 1200
Fax: 9380 1201

Melbourne Office
170 Clarendon Street
South Melbourne
Victoria 3205
Australia

Tel: 03 9685 5800
Fax: 03 9685 5810

Email National Film and Sound Archive, here

Website:
www.screensound.gov.au

History > Photography

submitted by ΑΘΑΝΑΣΙΟΣ ΚΑΛΛΙΓΕΡΗΣ on 30.05.2006

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 30.05.2006

National Film and Sound Archive. Rear entrance.

Until recently, the Archive was known as ScreenSound Australia.

The Archive is part of the Australian Film Commission.

It is Australia's audiovisual archive, collecting, preserving and sharing the nations moving image and recorded sound heritage.

For the Kytherian community - which has always been very heavily involved in the Radio & Cinema industry in Australia, at various levels, it is a very valuable resource.

Canberra Office

McCoy Circuit Acton
GPO Box 2002
Canberra ACT 2601
Australia

Tel: 02 6248 2000
Fax: 02 6248 2165

Sydney Office

Fox Studios Australia
Level 1 Frank Hurley Grandstand Building
FSA #63 Driver Avenue
Moore Park NSW 1363 Australia

Tel: 02 9380 1200
Fax: 9380 1201

Melbourne Office
170 Clarendon Street
South Melbourne
Victoria 3205
Australia

Tel: 03 9685 5800
Fax: 03 9685 5810

Email National Film and Sound Archive, here

Website:
www.screensound.gov.au

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 30.05.2006

National Film and Sound Archive.

Until recently, the Archive was known as ScreenSound Australia.

The Archive is part of the Australian Film Commission.

It is Australia's audiovisual archive, collecting, preserving and sharing the nations moving image and recorded sound heritage.

For the Kytherian community - which has always been very heavily involved in the Radio & Cinema industry in Australia, at various levels, it is a very valuable resource.

Canberra Office

McCoy Circuit Acton
GPO Box 2002
Canberra ACT 2601
Australia

Tel: 02 6248 2000
Fax: 02 6248 2165

Sydney Office

Fox Studios Australia
Level 1 Frank Hurley Grandstand Building
FSA #63 Driver Avenue
Moore Park NSW 1363 Australia

Tel: 02 9380 1200
Fax: 9380 1201

Melbourne Office
170 Clarendon Street
South Melbourne
Victoria 3205
Australia

Tel: 03 9685 5800
Fax: 03 9685 5810

Email National Film and Sound Archive, here

Website:
www.screensound.gov.au

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 30.05.2006

Banners outside the National Archives, Canberra, Australia.

The National Archives are an extraordinarily valuable resource, where many Kytherian-Australian documents and records are kept.

It would be interested to undertake a systematic project to uncover this plethora of Kytherian information.

http://www.naa.gov.au/default.html

"The National Archives promotes good government recordkeeping and encourages community awareness and use of valuable Commonwealth records in its care. We have galleries, a reading room and offices in Canberra and a reading room and offices in each State capital and Darwin".

Main Switchboard (02) 6212 3600

Reference inquiries only 1300 886 881

Fax (02) 6212 3699

Email National Archives, here

About us

"Holding on to our history – that’s what the National Archives of Australia does. We care for valuable Commonwealth government records and make them available for present and future generations to use. Our recordkeeping standards help government to account to the public, ensuring that evidence is available to support people’s rights and entitlements and that future generations will have a meaningful record of the past.

Our collection

The records in our collection trace the events and decisions that shaped the nation. We hold the papers of Governors-General, Prime Ministers and Ministers. We have Cabinet documents, Royal Commission files and departmental records on defence, immigration, security and intelligence, naturalisation, and many other issues involving the federal government.

The main focus of our collection is records created since the formation of the Commonwealth of Australia in 1901. We also have some nineteenth-century records relating to functions that were transferred by the colonies to the Commonwealth government, including shipping and post offices.

While most records in the collection are files, we also have significant holdings of photographs, posters, maps, architectural drawings, films, playscripts, musical scores and sound recordings.

This vast collection is a rich resource for the study of Australian history, Australian society and the Australian people and is accessible to all. We welcome enquiries, and visitors to our reading rooms, and provide a range of databases, guides and leaflets to assist.

Our head office is located in Canberra and we have offices in each State capital and in Darwin. Our collection is dispersed in these offices across Australia. In addition to caring for our collection, we develop and tour exhibitions, publish books and guides to our collection and deliver educational programs.

Recordkeeping standards and advice

Australian Government agency staff and other recordkeeping professionals are valuable partners for the Archives in ensuring that all Australians can use Commonwealth records. Many records are now created in electronic forms that are harder to preserve and keep accessible over time. It is important to build systems that ensure valuable records survive. The Archives assists agencies by developing policies, standards, guidelines and providing training and advice about modern recordkeeping".

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 30.05.2006

Migrants collecting their meals.....

....in the dining hall at the Bonegilla migrant reception, 1949.

Migrant Reception Centres were set up to accomodate people while they waited for employment and other living arrangements to be made.

The centres also served as an introduction to Australian life.

From the photographic files of the National Archives, Canberra.

Numerous photographs of this type are on file in the National Archives.

They are easily accessible.

More information about the National Archives

A systematic research project would almost definitely uncover "Kytherian" photographs, buried in this Archive.

In the meantime, we wonder whether Kytherians had any experience of Migrant Reception Centres of this type, particularly in the post WWII period?

History > Photography

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 29.05.2006

National Archives. ACT. Canberra.

An extraordinarily valuable resource, where many Kytherian-Australian documents and records are kept.

It would be interested to undertake a systematic project to uncover this plethora of Kytherian information.

http://www.naa.gov.au/default.html

"The National Archives promotes good government recordkeeping and encourages community awareness and use of valuable Commonwealth records in its care. We have galleries, a reading room and offices in Canberra and a reading room and offices in each State capital and Darwin".

Main Switchboard (02) 6212 3600

Reference inquiries only 1300 886 881

Fax (02) 6212 3699

Email National Archives, here

About us

"Holding on to our history – that’s what the National Archives of Australia does. We care for valuable Commonwealth government records and make them available for present and future generations to use. Our recordkeeping standards help government to account to the public, ensuring that evidence is available to support people’s rights and entitlements and that future generations will have a meaningful record of the past.

Our collection

The records in our collection trace the events and decisions that shaped the nation. We hold the papers of Governors-General, Prime Ministers and Ministers. We have Cabinet documents, Royal Commission files and departmental records on defence, immigration, security and intelligence, naturalisation, and many other issues involving the federal government.

The main focus of our collection is records created since the formation of the Commonwealth of Australia in 1901. We also have some nineteenth-century records relating to functions that were transferred by the colonies to the Commonwealth government, including shipping and post offices.

While most records in the collection are files, we also have significant holdings of photographs, posters, maps, architectural drawings, films, playscripts, musical scores and sound recordings.

This vast collection is a rich resource for the study of Australian history, Australian society and the Australian people and is accessible to all. We welcome enquiries, and visitors to our reading rooms, and provide a range of databases, guides and leaflets to assist.

Our head office is located in Canberra and we have offices in each State capital and in Darwin. Our collection is dispersed in these offices across Australia. In addition to caring for our collection, we develop and tour exhibitions, publish books and guides to our collection and deliver educational programs.

Recordkeeping standards and advice

Australian Government agency staff and other recordkeeping professionals are valuable partners for the Archives in ensuring that all Australians can use Commonwealth records. Many records are now created in electronic forms that are harder to preserve and keep accessible over time. It is important to build systems that ensure valuable records survive. The Archives assists agencies by developing policies, standards, guidelines and providing training and advice about modern recordkeeping".

History > Photography

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 29.05.2006

Mount Athos

Time travel ... an ornate screen in the light-filled Skiti Agios Andrea church. Photo: Gary Walsh

History > Photography

submitted by The Daily Examiner, Grafton on 29.05.2006

Living History

Photograph: Historical researchers Effy Alexakis and Leonard Janiszewski, (left and right)in the USA, 2005.

Photograph from:

http://www.international.mq.edu.au/staffNews.asp?itemID=484

The Daily Examiner, Grafton. August 30, 2003, page 8.

by, Juris Graney
.


TEAM EFFORT:

MEET the man behind the mammoth project investigating and collating details of Greek cafes in Australia - Leonard Janiszewski.

Born in Sydney in September 1958, to Antofli and Concetta, Leonard had a knowledge from birth of the struggles of migrants coming to Australia.
“Both of my parents were part of the wave of ‘new Australians’ who migrated to Australia after World War Two as a result of the Federal Gov­ernment’s new immigration policy,” Mr Jani­szewski explained.
“I’m a legacy of that policy.”

Mr Janiszewski studied fine arts, archaeology, and both ancient and Australian history during his undergraduate years at Sydney University in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

Initially, fine arts was the interest he pursued, but he also excelled in Australian history and entered his postgraduate years with the intention of challenging certain methodologies in the study of Australian history.

“One of those is the almost sole reliance up­on English language-based documents, which ef­fectively marginalised those groups from non ­English speaking backgrounds in regard to their significance in Australia’s development,” he said.

His Australian history masters thesis at Syd­ney University focused upon the New South Wales gold rushes (1850s-1880S), and the diver­sity of peoples who had arrived from overseas to Australia during this period.

History > Photography

submitted by The Daily Examiner, Grafton on 29.05.2006

Our Yesterdays. Grafton's Greek connection.

A stroll in Athens with his uncle, before Chris Hatgis leaves for Greece

The Daily Examiner, Tuesday October 7, 2003, page 11.

By, Lauretta Godbee

Chris Hatgis
was 13 years old, when he travelled alone half-way round the world to meet up with the father he had not seen since Chris was a toddler.

Christos Hatgis was born in 1935, the Greek village of Yanohori, second child and eldest son of Louis and Ourania Hatgis.

The village 'then about the size at Ulmarra, but now there’s only three of four houses left’, accord­ing to Chris, was all but destroyed by German and Italian forces during World War II.

But before that, in 1937, Louis Hatgis had migrated to Australia. His family was to follow, as soon as he had found work and settled in their new land.

The outbreak of war put paid to that plan, and instead Ourania Hatgis and her children, Stella, Chris, and the youngest, Angelo. struggled through the war years in Greece while Louis spent the long years working with other Greek migrant men in vital war time occupations in Australia.

He worked as a timber cutter in Western Australia, Victoria and finally at Lowanna, near Dorri­go, where he cut sleepers with a broad axe.

On a weekend excursion to Grafton he met up with Nick Andronicus, who ran the Waratah Cafe, in Prince Street. “The cafe had been there for years, it was owned by the McGowan and Johnson families before Mr Andronicus bought it,” says Chris.

‘My father started working part-time with him, then became a partner, and finally bought out the business in the 1950s.”

The elder Hatgis had experi­ence in the restaurant business. In Greece before the war he had run a restaurant, but it specialised in the making of yoghurt and sweets — a far cry from the milk shakes and mixed grills of the Australian country town cafe.

With her husband unable to send her money, and three children to care for, the war years, and those immediately after were hard for Ourania Hatgis.

“She worked on the farms. Food was scarce, it was the same for everyone,” recalls Chris.
“We woulld use rock lime to ‘dynamite’ the fish in the river, and I can remember gladly eating left-over army rations out of an Italian soldier’s Dixie.
“When the Italians and the Ger­mans would come into the village we would all go into the hills and hide in the caves where they could­nt find us.”
Even at the end of the war the fighting did not stop, with Greek communist and government troops engaged in guerrilla war­fare that raged particularly hot around Yanohori, close to the Albanian border. Youngsters in the area were pressed to work for whichever force was in control at the time.

“One day we would be leading horses and mules up the mnoun­tam for the communists, then a few days later, the same thing for the government forces,” he says. “The people who hadn’t been driven out by the Gem-mans and Italians were ordered out by the guerrillas and fled from the civil war, some over the border into communist Albania and othes to other countries,” says Chris.

Eventually the Hatgis family left Yanohori, moving to live with an uncle in southern Greece, then to Castoria, a good-sized centre north of Salonika. where they lived for several years.

Then in 1949, Dad decided to bring me to Australia,” says Chris. From Castoria the 13-year-old travelled to Athens, where he stayed with an uncle. Then it was by air to Cairo, where he joined the passenger limier to Australia. It was a migm-ant ship and there were a number of other young­sters of various nationalities trav­elling to be reunited with family members in Australia. “I wasn’t scared at all,” says Chris. “There were a lot of kids like me. There was an older chap from Crete who would look after us.”

Extended family members were waiting on the wharf at Perth and Melbourne, and Chris spent some time with them before jour­ney’s end in Sydney, where he was reunited with his father. “It was the first time I had seen him since he left Greece, when I was two years old,” says Chris. “I turned 14 just after I got to Grafton.”

He did six months schooling Grafton Primary school, miiainl to improve his English — ‘But learned more English working alongside the girls in the shop’ - then quit school to go into the business.

One of the long-ago studlent who shared his first Australiam lessons was Ian Hamilton, still good friend and companion more than 50 years later.
Chris’ mother and the rest of the Hatgis family finally reached Australia in the early 1950's, and they too, worked in the Waratah, then in its original site on the eastem side of Prince street, near the St George corner.

Later Chris’ widowed grand­mother Manoucia, migrated from Greece, and came to live with the family for some years before her death.

“At that time nearly all the cafes in Grafton were owned by Greek families,” recalls Chris. “It was quite a close commu­nity.” The cafes were Langleys, the Waratah, Peter Theodores, Bernard’s Popular Cafe, Notaras’s Marble Bar and Moulos’s fish shop. Then there was the Simple Simon delicatessen and Harrison’s cake shop, which also did meals. They were all busy from nine in the morning, until late at night.

His father taught him to cook. “I couldn’t boil water when I arrived.” says Chris. Chris loved his years working in and later running the Waratah. “You met a lot of people, the farmers would come in for lunch in the old days and they liked a bit of a chat,” he says. “You found out everything that was going on.”

Chris met his wife Joan (nee Morrissey) at a dance in the Grafton Barn in 1956, and they mar­ried in 1960. Joan, formerly a Telecom telephonist, and Chris have three sons, John, Michael and Paul, all living in the Clarence Valley.

The Waratah moved to new premises on the western side of Prince Street in the early 1960s, then further towards the clock tower in 1987. Chris and Joan final­ly closed the business and retired in early 2002.

Louis Hatgis died in 1973, still actively working in the cafe, and his widow died earlier this year (2003).

Chris was to learn a different kind of cooking when he did national service and trained as an army cook - the only career he might have been willing to swap
for running a restaurant.

Today he golfs regularly, likes to go shooting and still loves fish­ing, notwithstanding the occa­sional tangle with a whale in the anchor chain, or a curious shark that nearly leaped into the five­-metre boat with Chris and two mates. “Its head, when it came up out of the water, was bigger than the boat’s motor,” Chris recalls.

Over the years family members have returned to Greece for vis­its. but Chris is happiest in Aus­tralia. "I’m pleased not to be in Greece.” he says emphatically. “People ask me would I go back. There’s nothing for me there. It was no good when I left. Why would I want to go back now?”

History > Photography

submitted by Clarence River Historical Society on 27.05.2006

Schaeffer House, Grafton. Signpost.

The magnificent Schaeffer House, home of the Clarence River Historical Society.

190 Fitzroy St.
Grafton NSW 2460
Australia

PO Box 396
Grafton NSW 2460

Ph: (02) 6642 5212
Fax:(02) 6642 5212

Email, Clarence River Historical Society
www.nor.com.au/community/museums

Schaeffer House holds many Kytherian photographs, documents, and realia (objects).

History > Photography

submitted by Clarence River Historical Society on 27.05.2006

Schaeffer House, Grafton.

The magnificent Schaeffer House, home of the Clarence River Historical Society.

190 Fitzroy St.
Grafton NSW 2460
Australia

PO Box 396
Grafton NSW 2460

Ph: (02) 6642 5212
Fax:(02) 6642 5212

Email, Clarence River Historical Society
www.nor.com.au/community/museums

Schaeffer House holds many Kytherian photographs, documents, and realia (objects).

History > Photography

submitted by Karen Cominos on 17.05.2006

Lukac Jessica Anne

 

History > Photography

submitted by Karen Cominos on 17.05.2006

Ginocchi Ii Giovanni Antonio