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Old Letters / Christoforianika

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History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 07.09.2007

WW2 Letter from Philip Chlentzos to his brother Peter, Feb 12 1944 (p. 1 of 2)

Philip and Peter Chlentzos were two of the four sons of Diamantis Haralambos Chlentzos and Yiannoula Koulentianos who enlisted in WW2. Philip died in combat on July 27, 1944, from injuries sustained during the invasion of Omaha Beach in France.

Philip's letters to his brother have just been rediscovered. I never met my Uncle Phil, but through these letters I have gotten to know him.

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 07.09.2007

Letter from Peter Clentzos regarding honorable discharge for his father

My grandfather Diamantis Chlentzos received an honorable discharge from the United States Navy at the age of 95, shortly before his death. My uncle Peter Clentzos wrote a letter of thanks to the Veterans of Foreign Wars. See also Old Letters: United States Congressman requests honorable discharge, p. 1

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

United States Congressman requests honorable discharge, p. 2

Page two of the letter written by Congressman Roybal regarding the Honorable discharge request for my grandfather, Diamantis Chlentzos.

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

United States Congressman requests honorable discharge, p. 1

This letter was written by a U.S. Congressman to request an honorable discharge for my grandfather Diamantis Chlentzos, from his naval service.

The letter is in two pages

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 Vmail correspondence July 19, 1944

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

This was the last letter written by my uncle Philip Chlentzos. He would die in combat 8 days later, on July 27, 1944.

The text reads:

July 19, 1944
France

Dear Pete,

I received your letter of June 20 a few days ago and was glad to again hear from you. I'm still in excellent shape and hope to continue feeling this way.

I've been on this front for a long time now and have found htings pretty hot at times.
I haven't heard from Angelo for over a week and as strange as it seems it takes a long time for mail to travel from here to England.
Did you know that the date of your wedding anniversary is the same as Alpena's (my gal) birthday anniversary? Strange?
It's most always cloudy here. It doesn't get very cold during the nights though, and that's to good advantage knowing sleeping underground is bad enough.
How is Helen? Oh, I forgot! Congratulations to you and Helen on your 3rd wedding anniversary. It's a bit late, but you know how things are nowadays-- always late.
Well, Pete, gotta end now. Thanks for the swell long letters & keep it up. Write soon.
Your brother, Philip

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 Correspondence to Philip Chlentzos, July 1944

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

This letter was written to my Uncle Philip and was probably one of the last ones received before his death in combat in July, 1944.

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 Vmail correspondence, April 22, 1944

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

These letters were written by my uncle Philip Chlentzos in the months prior to his death in combat in July, 1944

The text reads:

Somewhere in the British Isles

Dear Pete,
I got your long typewritten letter yesterday & was glad to again hear from you.
I'm still in the best of health, find nothing to worry about and having a lot of fun when I get the chance.
I'm glad to learn you again made the highest physical fitness rating for officers on the post. Remember I used to chin myself 33 times? I might be able to surpass that if we trained that way. EVen with a full field pack on my back-- HAW!
I haven't heard a thing about that play writing contest. Seems to me they've forgotten all about it. I have the original here and I might send it to you later on to keep for me. The real McCoy though is lying somewhere near the judges itching to be read but alas--HO HUM!
Please don't think I'm trying to get away frm writing a lot to you by writing V-Mail. I haven't and won't have the usual time to write long letters. However, do continue writing me those long letters cause I enjoy every one from you.
Well, Pete, closing time again. Say hello to Helen for me, and also to her folks when you see them. "Got some gum YANK?" HAW!
Brother Phil

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 Vmail Correspondence from Angelo Chlentzos, April 19, 1944

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

This letter is written by my uncle Angelo Chlentzos.

The text reads:

Dear Pete,
Received your letter today and was very glad to hear from you again. I got to meet Philip a few days ago and we had quite a chat together. He was certainly glad to see me and I was likewise. The weather isn't bad at all here although we've quite some rain at times. I am feeling fine.
Philip also sends his regards. If you get a chance send me some gum or candy, other things I can get here ok. Best regards to you and Helen, also to the folks. Your brother, Angelo

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 Vmail correspondence April 9 1944

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

These letters were written by my uncle Philip Chlentzos in the months before his death in combat in July, 1944.

The text reads:

Northern Ireland

Dear Pete,
I certainly had a surprise on April 7. I saw Angelo for the first time in almost 2 years and that eventful day was our birthday anniversary, and we met in Ireland. That's one for the books (our birthdays are on the same date).
We had a supper in town (spam, beans, toast, and tea). We murdered a little time talking and he showed me a lot of pictures of the family. Jean & the baby that was taken recently. The baby really is cute. He gave me that picture of you & himself. Very good picture too.
We'll be seeing each other regularly from now on now that I know how to get in touch with him.
I am now a correspondent, as some would term it, and every day I interview a few of the fellas in my company and send the information to their home town paper so their friends will know where they are and what they are doing. Think I'll interview myself one of these spring days.
I'm in excellent health, as is Angelo. Hello to Helen. Write soon. Your brother, Philip.

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 Vmail correspondence, March 5 1944

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

These letters were written by my uncle Philip in the months prior to his death in combat in July, 1944.

The text reads:

Dear Pete,
I received your v-mail letter of Feb. 22 esterday, and was again very glad to hear from you.
I was indeed very surprised to hear about Angelo being shipped overseas. I guess that's why I haven't been hearing from him these past few months.
No, I haven't received a picture of Sandra yet, and I surely wish someone would send me a picture of her.
Inquire at the house and find out if anyone has already sent one to me. If not, see if you can send me one, ok?
I haven't been having fun-- only when I'm given the chance. Of course everyone usually exposes his usual gripe, and that undoubtedly keeps the soldier going. I find it humorous listening to the fellas bash, and keeping myself ingood condition leaves me no worries. I, too, gripe at times but why should I be different. HAW! HAW!
While on the Atlantic, one fella slightly scared said, "Suppose a sub happened by and torpedoes us, what would you do?" I said, "What the hell, Joe, we're all on the same boat."
One guy here said he was going to carve out a new career for himself after the war-- he's going to start chiseling.
Well, Pete, It's about all for now. It's always good to hear from you and please keep it up.
Say hello to Helen for me. So long. Your brother, Phil

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 Vmail letter to Pete Clentzos from his brother Philip, Feb. 28 1944

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

These letters were written by my uncle Philip in the months prior to his death in combat in July, 1944

Text:

Northern Ireland

Dear Pete,

I received your vmail letter of Feb. 9 and was very glad to hear from you.
It's very cold here now, and we had a bit of snow. I'm in excellent shape-- always to remain as such.
Conditions here are a bit stiff and one can't expect anything other than that. A lot different than the training in the States.
The only thing I can use is a box of candy. Something like peanut brittle. If it won't inconvenience you could you? After all,one or two candy bars a week have been nourishing us, and a bit more from good old USA will be most inviting!
Well, Pete, I'm rushed for time and later when I have more time I'll write you a lot more. My 28th birthday anniversary is April 7. Write again real real soon.
Your brother, Phil

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 Vmail letter From Philip Chlentzos to Peter Clentzos January 1944

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

These letters were written by my uncle Philip in the months before his death in July, 1944

Text of the letter:

Dear Pete,
I just got back from London England & Boy that's really a place. I had an enjoyable time and saw a great deal of the sights it has to offer. I saw Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, Big Ben, Scotland Yard, Downing St, the world famous Wax Museum, Blitzed areas, London Bridge, Tower Bridge, monuments, etc.
I met a fellow from the Greek Navy and we batted the breeze for awhile. He hasn't been home for four years. I rode in those old taxis and on the seemingly wrong side of the street. Wow! Can they drive!
I saw uniforms from every allied country. Czechs, Greece, Poland, Russia, Belgium, Free French, Norwegians, Canadians, etc. Boy, what color!
I met a canadian who worked at the same place I did in L.A. (the P.E. Freight Depot). Such a small world.
All the buildings are old, and to me it seemed rather strange. Westminster Abbey is certainly enormous. Most of the English officers carry canes. Rather traditional, and rather handy too.
I'll tell you more about London someday, and you'll find my descriptions rather amazing as well as amusing. Say hello to Helen for me. I'm feeling fine. Write soon, Peter.
Brother Phil

History > Old Letters

submitted by Terry Chlentzos on 26.08.2007

WW2 V-mail letter from Philip Chlentzos to his brother Peter

There was no real secret to the v-mail process; in fact it was simple, the soldiers wrote their letters on a form provided and it was then photographed onto microfilm which was simply flown to the USA. A reel of 16mm microfilm could contain 18,000 letters and in terms of bulk and weight the roll of film took up only a fraction of what 18,000 real letters would take. Upon arrival in the USA the letters were printed from the film and then posted onward to the addressee.

These letters were written by my uncle Philip in the months before his death in July, 1944

The letter reads:

Dear Pete,
I received your letter of Oct. 19, and was sure glad to hear from you. It took your free letter about 3 weeks to get here-- but it got here.
Doesn't it seem kinda strange knowing I'm somewhere in Northern Ireland? Oh, it isn't very far from home-- just 1/3 way around the world. Sure a small world.
Although the weather is continually damp & wet, and rain falls every day, I don't seem to mind my stay here. Although it bothers my sinus a bit, it won't let a good man down.
Amazing as it may seem, a fellow and I have written a hilarious 3-act play to be presented in the very near future. The title, "As the Bartender Saw it." Read by many. I'll venture to say that the satisfaction they gained from it forces me to also say it's very good. (Despite my boasting).
Very soon I expect to drop in and see what Belfast has to offer. Ever hear of it? HAW.
The spending of British money was a bit irritating and complicated at first, but time changed everything. Some sure wished they went to school now. The English accent is used very strongly & really do enjoy conversing with some of the people. Well, Pete, I'll end now. Hope you & Helen are in the best of health and tell Helen I said bells-- all the way from Ireland. I'm in excellent health.
Your brother, Phil
p.s. Write soon

History > Old Letters

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 26.01.2007

Konstantin Bernardos letter to Yiannis & Marigo Alfieris in the USA 1951

This letter was written by Konstantin Bernardos to my grandparents Yiannis and Marigo Alfieris, in the USA. They had lost contact for many years after Yiannis and Marigo immigrated to the USA. K. Bernardos somehow finds their address and writes this letter.
Marigo's mother was Efrocene Bernardos from Christoforianika.
Any information on the author or his descendants would be appreciated.

Translated the letter reads:

Konst. E. Bernardos
Athina 8
27 Odos Aiginis, Sinikia Kypselis

in Athens on May 14, 1951

Dear John and Marigo,

As they say, only the mountains cannot get together. After 35 or 38 years, all of a sudden Vasillis, Regoulas husband, came to my house. I did not recognize him right away. He told me that Regoula has a correspondence with you and that you were asking about me. I was so emotional and surprised. Even my eyes were watering – because after the Second World War for about five years the question was going around in my mind; how was Diamandis, John, Marigo and their children doing? Also the child of Panayiotis (I think Panayioitis is Diamandis’ brother that lived in San Francisco). I have an album that has all the pictures that I took when I was with you. I have pictures of John, Marigo and their child, Kostaki they call him, I don’t remember.

How are you? Years and years have gone by. Then I as a young boy and today I am in my 60’s with a family (3 boys). I didn’t have your address to write. When I learned the address of our relatives in Baltimore and New York to learn if you had a correspondence with anybody and if they knew anything about you. Some of the relatives said they didn’t know you, others didn’t answer. Maybe they were afraid that I would ask them for favors or something. Well the point is, after so many years, I have heard from you and I would like you to write back to me. Don’t be lazy! Write for everybody and how they are doing. I am 26 years married and as I mentioned, I have three boys. The first one was in the Army and was just discharged 3 months ago.

God saved my life during the war. Greece these days is going through the Civil War. A lot of damage was done during the war. We didn’t have any water, phones, bridges were destroyed, and people were in misery. Probably you know through the newspapers. I hope we will not have any other wars like this. Things started getting better now. They are working on transportation and factories are open again. Villages in northern Greece have had catastrophic problems.

Write me about our relatives. How is the unfortunate Despina? How is she now that her husband died and they brought him to Tsirigo and then she went back to the USA?

My family sends sincere regards to you and to our relatives. Tell them to write back.

With lots of love,

Kostas

History > Old Letters

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 02.01.2007

Postcard of Myrtidiotisa 1947

This was a post card sent to Maria Alfieris (nee Chlentzos) in Oakland, California, dated 15/12/47.
I beleive it was from her nephew, Manolis Sofios, from Logothetianika, and was taken by him, but I can not be certain.

To see a larger photograph of the monastary
Click here

********************************************************

Dear Thea,

We wish for you a good Christmas and good luck in the New Year.

Manolis
15/12/47