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History > Documents

submitted by George Poulos on 22.11.2005

Ollie Konstandinou (Tzortzo)Poulos.

Record of Death and Order for Internment Certificate.

Number: 02274

Dated: 29th January, 1954

Date of Death: 28th January, 1954

Time of Funeral: 2:00pm, Friday, 29th January

Grave site number: 3142

See also:

Ollie Con(standinou) (Tzortzo)Poulos. Searching for baby Ollie

Old Dubbo Cemetery, Dubbo Municipal Council Cemetery Document, Ollie Poulos

Location Map of the Old Dubbo Cemetery

Old Dubbo Cemetery sign. Looking from Myall Street; the southern end

History > Documents

submitted by Society of Kytherian Studies on 07.11.2005

Parliamentary Luncheon brochure. In honour of Professor Nikos Petrochilos.

Held at New South Wales Parliament House, on Wednesday, 2nd November, 2005, in the Private Dining Room, NSW Parliament House, Macquarie Street, Sydney.

Co-hosted by

The Honourable George Souris MP
Shadow Member for Gaming and Racing
Shadow Minister for Sport and Recreation
Member for Upper Hunter and Member of the Nationals


and

The Honourable James Samios, AM. MBE.

During Professor Petrochilos's triumphant visit to Australia, 17th October, 2005 - 4th November, 2005.

Details and overview of Professor Petrochilos's visit

Biography and Achievements of Professor Nikos Petrochilos

Biography and Achievements of George Souris, MP

Biography and Achievements of The Honourable James Samios, AM. MBE

History > Documents

submitted by Peter Bouras on 01.09.2005

Theodore Simos's Handbook To The University Of Oxford

Date: 1956

Written in Theodore's hand, inside:

His signature, and

Lincoln College, the name of the College he attended.

History > Documents

submitted by Francie Campbell on 11.09.2005

Passenger List of the T.S.S.

Incoming Passenger List of the T.S.S. "Largs Bay" which contains the names of my grandparents Anastasios (Ernest) and Spiridoula (Lily) Combes/Coombes.

On this list Spiridoula, (spelt 'Spyridoula') was listed as 'MW' - meaning "Mother with child", as she was pregnant with her first child, George. George Combes/Coombes, who was born in October, 1924 in Tenterfield, New South Wales. Anastasios (Ernest) Combes/Coombes’ name was listed as ‘Anastassi’.

Anastasios was listed as a waiter, and 25 yrs old. Spiridoula was listed as 24 yrs of age.

The ship arrived on the 18th August, 1924 in Sydney, Australia. On the passenger list they were classed as 'Aliens'.

Note that there are 4 other Greek people listed as well. The other Greek (Kytherian(?)) passengers were:

1. Coroneos, Kyrania - Waiter - Female - 21 yrs - Single
2. Stratigos, Emmanuel - Waiter - Male - 28 yrs - Married
3. Stratigos, Marieta - MW [Mother with child] - Female - 24 yrs - Married
4. Scordillis, Emmanuel - Waiter - Male - 27 or 29 yrs - Single.

According to the log book of this ship, the voyage was not without incident - there were 3 stowaways, 'transhipped' from the T.S.S. "Moreton Bay" on the 1st June, 1924 in the Red Sea to the T.S.S. “Largs Bay”! The 3 stowaways were aiming to get to England. They were listed as: Antonio Cutafar aged 18 yrs - Maltese; Genges? N. Downs aged 31 yrs - Greek; and Basile Phararoo aged 24 yrs - Greek. The stowaways were handed over to the police in Port Said for prosecution! Also, an apprentice on board was also 'paid off' on account of suffering from pleurisy; and a 29 yr old British crew member was found dead on a Sydney wharf - cause of death unknown!

***Note, that a legible copy of the document can be obtained by pressing the enlarge symbol, (right hand corner), and then printing off the enlarged version of the document.

History > Documents

submitted by Francie Campbell on 11.09.2005

Naturalization Certificate of Spiridoula (Lily) Combes/Coombes

This is Spiridoula (Lily) Combes/Coombes' Certificate of Naturalization as an Australian Citizen, issued and granted in August, 1949. (This certificate has Spiridoula's surname spelt a different way as you can see.)


It reads:

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA.

Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948.

CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION AS AN AUSTRALIAN CITIZEN
.

WHEREAS Spiradoula COUMPIS (known as Lily COOMBES)
has applied for a Certificate of Naturalization as an Australian Citizen, alleging with
respect to herself the particulars set out on the reverse side hereof, and has satisfied
me that she has fulfilled the conditions laid down in the Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948 for the grant of such a Certificate:

NOW THEREFORE I, the Minister of State for Immigration, hereby grant, in pursuance of the Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948 this Certificate of Naturalization, whereby, subject to the provisions of the said Act and of any other law affecting the rights of naturalized persons, the said Spiradoula COUMPIS (known as Lily COOMBES)
shall, as from the date upon which he swears allegiance to His Majesty King George VI. his heirs and successors, and swears to observe faithfully the laws of Australia and to fulfil his duties as an Australian citizen, become entitled to all political and other rights, powers and privileges, and become subject to all obligations, duties and liabilities to which an Australian citizen or a British subject is entitled or subject, and have to all intents and purposes the status of an Australian citizen and British subject.

Dated this NINTH................................day
of AUGUST................................... One thousand
nine hundred and FORTY-NINE.

Arthur Caldwell {Signature}

Minister of State for lmmigration.

CERTIFICATE BY JUDGE, MAGISTRATE, OR OTHER JUDICIAL OFFICER.
I EDWARD THOMPSON ORAM..............................do hereby certify
that on the Twenty sixth.....................day of.......August.............1949

the grantee of this Certificate Spiradoula COUMPIS (known as Lily COOMBES)

appeared before me at Central Court of Petty Sessions, Sydney.
swore allegiance to His Majesty King George VI. his heirs and successors, and swore to observe faithfully the laws of Australia and to fulfil his duties as an Australian
citizen. Signature.. E. T. ORAM {Signature}

Title Stipendiary Magistrate

History > Documents

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 29.04.2005

Passenger Incoming Record, Chris Coroneos (Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos.

Ship: Cephee
Port of Embarkation: Port Said
Chris arrived in Australia on: 29th Feb 1924


Chris was born in Karavas, Kythera.

Chris's parents were Anna Kritharis, and Demetrios Melasofaos Koroneos.

Chris Coroneos (Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos married Melba Comino (Melpomeni Kosmas Kominos) in Goulburn, NSW, on the 3rd July, 1924.

Melba's parents were Anna (Kirranni) Tzortzopoulos Douris from Douranika, and Charles Kosma Komino.

A photograph of the wedding party can be viewed at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Weddings and Proxenia. A copy of their wedding certificate can be viewed at History, subsection, Documents. Other documents pertaining to their life can also be found there.

Soon after they moved to the small town of Gunning, in southern NSW.

They bought the Busy Bee Cafe. They worked hard in the Cafe from 1924 to the end of 1951, when they retired to Sydney because of Chris's ill-health.

They had six children, James, Charles, Annie, Matty, George and Peter.

History > Documents

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 29.04.2005

Statutory Declaration (Part 2) by Chris Coroneos (Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos in order to obtain Naturalisation Papers.

[Second page of document, featured in the previous entry].

Dated: 18th December, 1924.

This side attests to his recent marriage.

Chris was born in Karavas, Kythera.

Chris's parents were Anna Kritharis, and Demetrios Melasofaos Koroneos.

Chris Coroneos (Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos married Melba Comino (Melpomeni Kosmas Kominos) in Goulburn, NSW, on the 3rd July, 1924. A photograph of the wedding party can be viewed at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Weddings and Proxenia. A copy of their wedding certificate can be viewed at History, subsection, Documents.

Soon after they moved to the small town of Gunning, in southern NSW.

They bought the Busy Bee Cafe. They worked hard in the Cafe from 1924 to the end of 1951, when they retired to Sydney because of Chris's ill-health.

They had six children, James, Charles, Annie, Matty, George and Peter.

History > Documents

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 29.04.2005

Statutory Declaration (Part 1) by Chris Coroneos (Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos in order to obtain Naturalisation Papers.

Dated: 18th December, 1924.

[The second part of this Declaration is featured as the next document].

Chris was born in Karavas, Kythera.

Chris's parents were Anna Kritharis, and Demetrios Melasofaos Koroneos.

Chris Coroneos (Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos married Melba Comino (Melpomeni Kosmas Kominos) in Goulburn, NSW, on the 3rd July, 1924. A photograph of the wedding party can be viewed at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Weddings and Proxenia. A copy of their wedding certificate can be viewed at History, subsection, Documents.

Soon after they moved to the small town of Gunning, in southern NSW.

They bought the Busy Bee Cafe. They worked hard in the Cafe from 1924 to the end of 1951, when they retired to Sydney because of Chris's ill-health.

They had six children, James, Charles, Annie, Matty, George and Peter.

History > Documents

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 29.04.2005

Naturalisation Certificate of Chris Coroneos (Christiforos Dimitriou Koroneos) and Melba Comino (Melpomeni Kosma Komino). 24th April, 1925.

Both were born in Karavas, Kythera.

Chris's parents were Anna Kritharis, and Demetrios Melasofaos Koroneos.

Melba's parents were Anna (Kirranni) Tzortzopoulos Douris from Douranika, and Charles Kosma Komino.

Chris Coroneos (Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos married Melba Comino (Melpomeni Kosmas Kominos) in Goulburn, NSW, on the 3rd July, 1924. A photograph of the wedding party can be viewed at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Weddings and Proxenia. A copy of their wedding certificate can be viewed at History, subsection, Documents.

Soon after they moved to the small town of Gunning, in southern NSW.

They bought the Busy Bee Cafe. They worked hard in the Cafe from 1924 to the end of 1951, when they retired to Sydney because of Chris's ill-health.

They had six children, James, Charles, Annie, Matty, George and Peter.


Note: in the left hand corner -

By virtue of the grant of this certificate, Melba Coroneos, the wife of the said Christoforos Coroneos, aged 26 years, also becomes naturalised.

[That is no longer the practise of the Australian Government in the 21st century.]

History > Documents

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 29.04.2005

Melba Comino's (Melpomeni Kosmas Kominos) - Birth Certificate

Melba was born in Karavas, Kythera.

Melba's parents were Anna (Kirranni) Tzortzopoulos Douris from Douranika, and Charles Kosma Komino.

Melba married Chris Coroneos (Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos in Goulburn, NSW, on the 3rd July, 1924. A photograph of the wedding party can be viewed at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Weddings and Proxenia. A copy of their wedding certificate can be viewed at History, subsection, Documents.

Soon after they moved to the small town of Gunning, in southern NSW.

They bought the Busy Bee Cafe. They worked hard in the Cafe from 1924 to the end of 1951, when they retired to Sydney because of Chris's ill-health.

Two of their sons carried on the business until 1959 (Charles and George).

They had six children, James, Charles, Annie, Matty, George and Peter..

History > Documents

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 29.04.2005

Chris Coroneos ((Christoforos Dimitriou Coroneos) Melasofaos - Birth Certificate.

Chris was born in Karavas, Kythera.

Chris's parents were Anna Kritharis, and Demetrios Melasofaos Koroneos.

Chris married Melba Comino (Melpomeni Kosmas Kominos) in Goulburn, NSW, on the 3rd July, 1924. A photograph of the wedding party can be viewed at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Weddings and Proxenia. A copy of their wedding certificate can be viewed at History, subsection, Documents.

Soon after they moved to the small town of Gunning, in southern NSW.

They bought the Busy Bee Cafe. They worked hard in the Cafe from 1924 to the end of 1951, when they retired to Sydney because of Chris's ill-health.

Two of their sons carried on the business until 1959 (Charles and George).

They had six children, James, Charles, Annie, Matty, George and Peter..

History > Documents

submitted by Matty Lech (nee, Coroneos) on 29.04.2005

Wedding Certificate of Chris Coroneos (Christiforos Dimitriou Koroneos) and Melba Comino (Melpomeni Kosma Komino). 3rd July, 1924, Goulburn, NSW.

From 1924 to 1951, the couple owned and managed a shop - The Busy Bee in Gunning, in southern New South Wales.

A photograph of the couple, and the wedding party can be perused at Photography Diaspora, subsection, Weddings and Proxenia.

Capitan Mina (Tzortzo)Poulos was the best man.

History > Documents

submitted by George Sophios on 06.03.2005

Medal commemorating the relief of the Ionian Islands, 1800

Artist/maker: unknown
Date made: 1800
Place made: Russia
Materials: silver
Measurements: Overall: 74 mm
Credit: National Maritime Museum, London
Collection: Coins & Commemorative Medals

Description:
Medal commemorating the relief of the Ionian Islands, 1800.

Obverse: Bust of Admiral Ushakov in uniform and orders (right). Legend in Russian (The valiant and pious Russian Admiral Feodor Ushakov, 1800).

Reverse: A bird's-eye view of the citadel of Corfu and Vido Islands; two French ships of the line between, six Russian outside, all at anchor. Legend in Russian (Cephalonia to the saviour of all the Ionian Islands). Presented to the admiral in gold, the officers in silver and to the ships' companies in bronze, by the island of Cephalonia.

History > Documents

submitted by George Sophios on 06.03.2005

Ionian Islands Thirty Lepta, 1852.

Ionian Islands (under British rule) silver thirty lepta dated 1852.

Obverse: Value "30" in oak wreath: "IONIKON KPATOS 1852.”

Reverse: Seated Britannia holding spear and shield: “BRITANNIA”. Plain edge.

Diameter 16mm.

History > Documents

submitted by George Sophios on 06.03.2005

Ionian Islands. Coin. 1819.

Ionian Islands (under British rule) copper obol dated 1819.

Obverse: Winged lion above date: “IONIKON KPATOS 1819.”

Reverse: Seated Britannia holding spear and olive branch with shield resting against her: “BRITANNIA”.

Diameter 34mm.

History > Documents

submitted by Stephen Samios on 06.03.2005

Coat of Arms of the Ionian State?

A colour photocopy from a book provided by the Hon. Jim Samios, former Deputy Liberal leader in the Legislative Council, the Upper House in the Parliament of New South Wales.

It depicts the two flags of the Ionian State. These have been been depicted elswhere on the site, and their history explained in some detail. [See early entries in this Documents section. Alternatively, use the internal search engine to search under Flag].

Of interest here is the Coat of Arms that serves as the base for the two flags.

Is this a piece of artistic license or was a Coat of Arms adopted - with the United Kingdom Arms at the centre - and symbols for each of the 7 Ionian Islands bordering the UK Arms on the periphery?

Two senior members of Heraldry Australia, Stephen Szabo and Richard Num, have suggested another possibility. That the "flag base" is the official Great Seal of the Ionian Parliament(?)

"...for use by the Governor during the period of British rule.

Perhaps the design represents one side of that Great Seal"?

You will note that the symbol for Kythera is Aphrodite arising from the ocean.

History > Documents

submitted by Stephen Samios on 05.04.2005

Jim Samios. Tribute of John Howard, Prime Minister of Australia.

PRIME MINISTER

CANBERRA


A TRIBUTE TO THE HON. JIM SAMIOS, MLC

I regret that I cannot be with you at this special “True Blue Legends” function* to honour the outstanding contribution of Jim Samios.

Over many years Jim has been a standard bearer for the cause of cultural diversity within the Liberal Party and has helped to shape Liberal thinking in this important area of public policy.

As Parliamentary Secretary, Shadow Minister, and Chairman of Government Policy Committees for over a decade Jim has shown leadership and constancy on this issue.

He has brought to his roles strong and relevant experience including through his involvement with migrant settlement and work as a member of the Special Broadcasting Service in the early 1980’s. These qualifies have been complemented by his further work with the Greek Orthodox Church over a great many years and through his efforts with the Ethnic Communities Councils.

To Jim is due our praise for demonstrating the special contribution of our ethnic communities to help make this country what it is today. For many years Jim has shown to us that our shared values have guaranteed a level of social cohesion that is the envy of the world.

As a champion for his cause he has revealed that we join together as Australians strengthened by a diversity of language, experience and cultural background.

Ours is a resilient cornmunty that has extended a generous welcome to people from every corner of the world and so we honour Jim’s long career, his contribution to the Liberal Party in this state and his important message of friendship and shared values.


JOHN HOWARD


*Testimonial Dinner. Held at the Westin Hotel, Sydney.
Monday, 24th June, 2002.

History > Documents

submitted by Stephen Samios on 03.03.2005

Jim Samios. Maiden Speech to the Legislative Council - Upper House of the New South Wales Parliament.

Legislative Council

12/09/1984

GOVERNOR’S SPEECH: ADDRESS IN REPLY

Extract

The Hon. J. M. SAMIOS [4.59]: Mr President, I rise as a newly elected member of this ancient Chamber to congratulate you on your unanimous re-election to your high office of President of the oldest and most venerable House of Parliament in Australia. I offer my sincere congratulations to the Hon. B. J. Unsworth on his election as Leader of the House and the Hon. J. R. Hallam on his appointment as Minister for Agricuuture and Fisheries. I congratulate the Hon. H. B .French on his election as Government Whip. I thank the Hon. Franca Arena for her kind words of welcome to me on my election to this House. It has been my pleasure to have worked for some years with the Hon. Franca Arena and the Hon.J. Kaldis in a bipartisan way on ethnic issues. I look forward to working with them and all the members of his honourable House to the benefit of the people of this State. I wish to thank all those responsible for supporting my endorsement within the Liberal Party and my subsequent election to this honourable House. In so doing I give my assurance that I shall do my utmost to prove worthy of that great honour. Since my election to Parliament, I have received much personal kindness from you Mr President, from members on both sides of the House, the officers of the Parliament, especially Mr L. A. Jeckein, and the staff of the House. To all I would say thank you.

One cannot stand in the hallowed atmosphere of this ancient Chamber without sensing an aura of history when remembering the giants that bestrode it—men who by their conduct and service gave credence to the role of the second chamber as a bastion of freedom, vigilance and above all courage in our democratic society. And was it not Pericles who some 2 500 years ago said, The secret of liberty is courage.

Indeed it is with feeling that I stand here and recall the election of my great, great grandfather, George Panayotopoulos of Kythera, Greece, to another Legislative Council, that of the Ionian Islands in 1863—then a protectorate of the United Kingdom. [See photograph of the members of the Ionian Parliament, in 1863; including George Panayotopoulos, which is the previous entry in this section]. It was, I believe, largely as a result of that historic link between the United Kingdom and the Ionian Islands that the migration of Greeks to Australia commenced last century.

For almost 200 years this timeless land has been the recipient of migrants from many countries. They and their children have been putting down their roots and in that time been battling nature’s hazards; the Great Depression; they have died at Gallipoli, on the Kokoda Trail, in Korea and in Vietnam. Whether in the isolation of the outback, on the turbulent goldfields, in the Snowy Mountains, or in the industrial inner suburbs of our major cities, migrant workers have sweated and toiled relentlessly for a better life and a greater Australia.

When the Commonwealth Government introduced the mass migration policy in1949, Australia had a population of seven and a quarter million but today, after thirty-five years, Australia has more than doubled the population to reach in excess of 15 million. In so doing, we have noticeably changed the racial composition of our country so that, today, it is believed we have more than 100 ethnic groups, we practice a diversity of acknowledged religions and we speak over 100 languages and dialects daily. Today 20 per cent of our population were born overseas and over half of the population are from non-English speaking backgrounds. It is estimated that they and their offspring born here approximate 3 million. Today, in the words of the late President John F. Kennedy,

We stand on the edge of a new frontier. This growth and development in our country has not been without hardship, tears and suffering, but the wonder of it is that so much was achieved within such a short space of time within the framework of a cohesive, multi-cultural Australian society. I pay tribute to the mass migration policy initiated by the Commonwealth Government in 1948 and I further acknowledge the important and beneficial role of successive Liberal Party-Country Party governments that maximized the migration intake. The following figures from Consolidated statistics of the Department of Immigration show that the highest intake of permanent settlers to this country occurred under a Liberal Party-Country Party government. In 1968-69 we received 175 657 permanent settlers; in 1969-70 we received 185 099. That was the year that immigration peaked; nearly 200 000 permanent settlers. In 1970-7 1 the figure dropped back a little to 170 011. I contrast those figures with the figures provided during the Whitlam Labor Government’s term of office of 89 147 and again with the Hawke Government’s intake for 1982-83 totalling 82 900 and for 1983-84, 74 000.

We can take pride in the historic decision of the Liberal Party-Country Party government in 1976 which led to the entry of some 90 000 Indo-Chinese refugees to this country, who are contributing with distinction and energy to Australians development and welfare. The natural resources of this great continent, both agricultural and mineral, as well as its massive territorial expanse, must needs see the present population of 15 million as a most conservative figure. There is ever a need for a breadth of vision in our decision-makers and community leaders as will ensure that this country’s full potential is realized. Whilst there may be coherent and valid reasons for curtailing migration at various stages of our development, we should with tenacity and fierce resolve do our utmost to maintain such maximum levels of migrant intake as we can possibly achieve. The recent CEBA study sponsored by the federal Government over the last three years, initiated when Mr lan McPhee was the Minister for Immigration and financed by the Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs and the Committee of the Economic Development of Australia, concludes, according to the Melbourne Age of 2nd August, 1984, that faster immigration would not increase unemployment and would have the benefit of reducing the relative burden of welfare spending on the aged. The report further quotes Dr Norman, the project’s director and a reader in Economics at Melbourne University, as saying —

Overall immigration continues to exert a generally favourable economic impact in Australia though the magnitude of net economic benefit is probably much less than in the 1950’s when vigorous secondary industry growth, more receptive attitudes and the need to fill a population hole created by low birth rates in the 1930’s each enabled immigration to contribute more tangibly to the Australian economy than it does apparently today.

The research further indicates that migrants create at least as many jobs as they take up. The recent report of the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations, according to Michael Lawrence’s report in the Sydney Morning Herald of the 10th September, 1984, shows apprenticeships in skilled trades in Australia were allowed to run down to such an extent in 1982-83 that a higher intake of skilled migrants might be required in the medium term to compensate. The report further states— Given that a high proportion of recent apprenticeship training effort has been directed to meeting replacement demand requirements rather than any net growth in employment in the trades, it may well be that this reduction in apprenticeship completion levels could lead to supply problems in at least some of the relevant occupational labour markets, making resort to immigration again a necessity.

Indeed, it is generally conceded that there are less than twenty genuine parliamentary democracies in the world today, and we here in the Antipodes are indeed privileged to be a worthy example of one of them—a cultural pluralism within a constitutional monarchial system. And, in this regard, I am mindful of the words of that eminent statement, Edmund Burke, who when speaking 200 years ago on the 16th June, 1784 on the Reform of the Representation of the Commons in Parliament Bill, said:

It is for fear of losing the inestimable treasure we have, that I do not venture to game it out of my hands for the vain hope of improving it. I look with filial reverence on the constitution of my country and never will cut it in pieces and put it into the kettle of any magician in order to boil it, with the puddle of their compounds, into youth and vigour. On the contrary, I will drive away such pretenders; I will nurse its venerable age and with lenient acts extend a parent’s breath.

In an age when the world is shrinking and enlightened men are moving closer together in common dialogue through the United Nations and the European Common Market it is a matter of pride that we here in Australia continue to play an important role in a multiracial Commonwealth of independent sovereign States. I believe that all sober thinking Australians are proud to be members of such a Commonwealth, headed symbolically by a Queen who has dedicated her life to her people and the unity of a multicultural Commonwealth of Nations.

Our law courts here in Australia have roots going back 800 years; our very Parliament in New South Wales, the Mother Parliament of Australia, has its roots in a House of Commons some 800 years old, but the monarchial system of which we are a part is over eleven hundred years old. I believe that the cohesion and tradition and stability provided to Australian society by our constitutional monarchy has in no small way been appreciated by newcomers to this country, be they economic or political migrants or refugees. And, as a descendent of a migrant to this country from southern Europe, I place on record my total and unequivocal support for the monarchy.

As Australians and as the only people on this earth to occupy a continent—the fifth continent—we have a special duty to ensure that we honour the heritage that the founding fathers and settlers to this country since 1788 have bequeathed to us, and to continue to ensure that the opportunities and resources of this continent are maximized to the benefit of all Australians, whether newly arrived or born here, and in this regard we must needs remember that the Australian Aborigine has yet to take his rightful place in our society and that the twin scourges of abominable poverty and high unemployment are still with us.

It is true that today the role of this Chamber and its members continues to be challenged by sections of the community. In an age of instant media, it is important therefore that the sterling efforts of members of this Chamber and this House be made known to the public. In this regard, I am persuaded that support should be given to the selective televising of proceedings in the upper House as well as the lower House. Initiatives taken in the Canadian House of Commons in the late 1970’s in this regard have indicated very positive results indeed, particularly in relation to the daily question period, which is carried live to major Canadian cities, and the weekly synopsis of parliamentary highlights every Sunday. People ask how it is possible for this State’s prime forum of debate to maintain its rightful importance when it is denied access to the nation’s prime medium for mass communication. In concluding may we be reminded of the words of a distinguished political architect of the Australian Constitution, Alfred Deakin, who, when speaking in Adelaide in 1898, said:

Awed as I feel by the fact that we come from, that we speak to, and that we act for a great constituency, I am awed by the thought of the constituency which is not visible, but which awaits the results of our labours —we are the trustees for posterity for the unborn millions, unknown and unnumbered—whose aspirations we may help them to fulfil and whose destinies we may assist to determine.

As I look around at members of this House today, who are prominent and senior figures in the professions, commerce, the primary industries, in the trade union movement, and in vital community organizations, I am encouraged to believe in the continued historic and vital role of this Chamber, as trustees of that posterity.

History > Documents

submitted by Stephen Samios on 01.03.2005

Ionian Parliament Meeting on Reunification with Greece, 23rd September, 1863.

From a photograph (under glass) supplied by the Hon. Jim Samios, former Deputy Liberal leader in the Legislative Council, the Upper House in the Parliament of New South Wales.

When making his inaugural speech in the Legislative Council, Jim stated that:

"One cannot stand in the hallowed atmosphere of this ancient Chamber without sensing an aura of history when remembering the giants that bestrode it—men who by their conduct and service gave credence to the role of the second chamber as a bastion of freedom, vigilance and above all courage in our democratic society. And was it not Pericles who some 2 500 years ago said, The secret of liberty is courage.

Indeed it is with feeling that I stand here and recall the election of my great, great grandfather, George Panayotopoulos of Kythera, Greece, to another Legislative Council, that of the Ioanian Islands in 1863—then a protectorate of the United Kingdom. It was, I believe, largely as a result of that historic link between the United Kingdom and the Ioanian Islands that the migration of Greeks to Australia commenced last century".

George Panayotopoulos, is in the back row - 4th from the right. (He is the man with the beard, whose head is "framed" by the two pillars).

History > Documents

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 15.02.2005

Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney. COAT OF ARMS.

Designed by Lindsey Katharos Critha, graphic designer, who resides in Berry, in New South Wales, Australia.

The design on the shield has evolved from Lindsey's original Karavas donkey Karavitiko Symposium logo, of the 1970's.

The donkey is laconic - unperturbed by the gradual de-population of Karavas, and the immigration of Karavas's inhabitants to Smyrna, Egypt, Pireaus, Australia, the USA, and other parts of the world.
In a sense the donkey is "looking away from ...the future...unconcerned".

The "attitude" also conveys the sublime sense of peace and quiet that attaches to the town of Karavas, Kythera.

The crest, or honour point of the Coat of Arms is the Cross of Ayios Haralambos, which also features on the Karavitiko Symposium Flag. This establishes the Church of Ayios Haralambos as the spiritual centre of Karavas.

The torse (originally the neck scarf which adorned a knight's helmet) - which lies beneath the Cross - carries the official colours - blue and gold.

The white border around the shield reflects the white lines on the field of both the official Greek National Flag, and the Karavitiko Symposium Flag.